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Nikonians Articles

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Showing all articles with keyword(s): studio
Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image: Post-processing
How-to's

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image: Post-processing

Martin Turner (Martin Turner)

What we’re going to look at in this part goes against the grain of what most photographers think. Most Photoshop warriors believe that they can improve the shot in post-processing. Actually, this is impossible. Read more...

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Shooting
How-to's

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Shooting

Martin Turner (Martin Turner)

Remember our scale at the beginning? 0-64 points for concept, 0-32 for working with people, 0-16 for planning, 0-8 for composition, 0-4 for lighting, 0-2 for shooting, 0-1 for post-processing? Multiply them all together, and the result ranges from 0 to 2 million. The way you shoot the shot can make an otherwise perfect image $2 million, $1million or $0. Read more...

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Lighting
How-to's

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Lighting

Martin Turner (Martin Turner)

Let’s recap where we started. To achieve the maximum effect, give yourself from 0-1 points for post-processing, 0-2 for shooting, 0-4 for lighting, 0-8 for composition, 0-16 for planning, 0-32 for working with people, and 0-64 for concept. Multiply these together. You will get a result between 0 and about 2 million. Read more...

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Composition
How-to's

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Composition

Martin Turner (Martin Turner)

The human eye interprets images in the following order: movement, colour, shape, content. If you wish to create images that sell products, change social behaviour, win election campaigns or merely persuade people to invest their evenings in watching a particular TV show, then you need to construct the image with these in mind. Read more...

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Planning
How-to's

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Planning

Martin Turner (Martin Turner)

Most photographers are not natural planners. If you come from a landscape background, you expect to be inspired by what you find. Photojournalists look for the decisive moment. Press photographers were always told ‘f8 and be there’. But even the most spontaneous photographer needs at least the basic planning of having their equipment ready when the moment happens. Read more...

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Human factor
How-to's

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Human factor

Martin Turner (Martin Turner)

The factor which can disrupt whole shoots or, equally, turn dross into gold, is what we call in the trade ‘the human factor’. Read more...

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Concept
How-to's

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image - Concept

Martin Turner (Martin Turner)

Concept beats everything else in studio photography. I want to share with you an image shot outdoors, in the dark, with no lights, no photographic equipment apart from a camera and a tripod, but which epitomises the studio method. Read more...

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image
How-to's

Studio Photography: Shooting the $2million image

Martin Turner (Martin Turner)

This is the first in an eight part series that looks at studio photography. I’m going to look at Concept, Working With People, Planning, Composition, Lighting, Shooting and Post-processing. Read more...

7 Things I Learnt Photographing 500 People
How-to's

7 Things I Learnt Photographing 500 People

Mike Hagen (Mike_Hagen)

Whether you will be photographing a single person or group or many, you will benefit from this article where Mike Hagen tells us the seven most important things he has learned, after doing it more than a few times. Read more...

The Window Light: Use natural light to shoot appealing portraits
How-to's

The Window Light: Use natural light to shoot appealing portraits

Jan Stimel (photocyan)

Many photographers use costly lighting equipment to create a pleasing look of their images. In this article our Nikonians author, Jan Stimel, explores the power of the window light and how it can be creatively used. Read more...

The home studio: Inspirational objects in your own home
How-to's

The home studio: Inspirational objects in your own home

Jan Stimel (photocyan)

There are some things in our world, unseen, small, unnoticed and unique, all waiting to be explored, captured and shared. We would like to invite you to a journey to discover such things, surprisingly - in your own home. Read more...

Personal Projects
How-to's

Personal Projects

User

Doesn't matter if you've just began with photography, or if you are more serious, defining a project in your mind before even picking up the camera will help you focus on what to shoot. In this article, Josh Larkin talks about how to choose and plan your own personal project and even lists five of the most common project themes. Read more...

Self Portraits
How-to's

Self Portraits

User

For years I've had a standard response to the question "Can I take your photo." It's essentially, "Nope, I'm a photographer so I like to stay on the side of the lens that I like better!" And while I do still try my best to stay out of other people's photographs, I've recently come to appreciate the self portrait. The thing of it is, making self portraits is a great exercise in creativity that offers us, as photographers, lots of learning opportunities. Read more...

Shooting at Twilight
How-to's

Shooting at Twilight

User

Your eyes can still see perfectly, but your camera can't keep up with you. Shooting at twilight can be challenging, but if done properly, you will be rewarded with beautiful sky colors in the background. How to work with lighting to get the right exposure for your photographs? Read more...

Balancing Ambient Light with Flash
How-to's

Balancing Ambient Light with Flash

User

I've got an understanding of apparent light size. I know what happens when I change the distance between my light source, my subject and my background. And I've moved through diffuse and direct reflections. Now it's time to get into some of the practical aspects of flash photography, and there's no place better to start than balancing ambient light with flash. Read more...

Specular Highlight Control
How-to's

Specular Highlight Control

User

In my last post I started looking more closely at diffuse and direct reflections and how both reveal the form and surface texture of a subject in a photograph. Through my exercises, I was able to exert better control over the placement and look of direct reflections, or specular highlights, and now I want to apply that knowledge to a subject where this has a dramatic impact on the end result: metal. Read more...

Neutral Density & Color Graduated Filters
Accessories Reviews

Neutral Density & Color Graduated Filters

J. Ramon Palacios (jrp)

Quite often the correct exposure for a background in a scene is not the best one for the foreground or viceversa. The most common problem is that the bright sky is reproduced perfectly while the landscape is underexposed; in fact pitch black most of the times. These are the occasions where the color and neutral density (ND) graduated (grad) filters can make the difference between a bad image, a good image and a better one. Read more...

Reflections
How-to's

Reflections

User

In my quest to better my own lighting techniques by going back and working through lessons in various books and on websites, I've looked at apparent light size and the inverse square law. Both of these topics and exercises gave me a better handle on the three aspects of light as it relates to a subject: the lit portion, the shadow portion and the transition areas that fall in between. Read more...

Lightsphere Flash Diffusers
How-to's Accessories Reviews

Lightsphere Flash Diffusers

J. Ramon Palacios (jrp)

We are often faced with complex lighting situations when we want to balance the light coming in from several sources into a scene and our subjects. Weddings and social events at noon time in large rooms, or churches, with large windows can become a nightmare with its mix of harsh light and strong shadows. After using for long a white card with a rubber, various solutions came to market and I have successively used most of them. Read more...

Control Over Your Lights With Distance
How-to's

Control Over Your Lights With Distance

User

In my article on Apparent Light Size, we saw the differences in light produced by large and small light sources. I demonstrated this by starting with a flash in a small softbox set up very close to a small object, therefore making a large light source. I then moved the light farther and farther away, thereby simulating a smaller light source. Read more...

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