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How-to's

So, What is Flash Value Lock?

Russ MacDonald (Arkayem)


Keywords: nikon, speedlights, lighting, flash

I've written in previous articles about the fact that the flash metering system measures only the center of the frame. This means that if the subject is not in the center of the frame, the brightness of the subject will likely be wrong.

 

20130701_092822_4.so-what-is-flash-value-lock_picture-1.jpg

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13 comments

Eric Beal (ISO200) on July 18, 2013

Hi Russ Thank you for your awesome tips and for the amount of time and energy you put into explaining them. You have made me a better photographer. Eric Beal

Michel Raguin (raguin) on July 17, 2013

Very useful article. Now I understand why some of pictures using the flash were too dark or too light

Traugott Bartels (tangobravo) on July 17, 2013

Thanks a lot for this usefull tip.

Allen Henderson (AAHNikon) on July 5, 2013

Nice article Russ. Thank you!

Charles Strong (cwstrong) on July 3, 2013

I found this on the web. Focus Value lock button needs to be setup. The answer to Morton’s question is to use the FV Lock function built into your Nikon dSLR. Everyone needs to know that using Nikon flashes in TTL or TTL BL or even Manual will always result in pre flashes if you are operating in the Nikon CLS. What I mean is that if you have an SB-800 Commander (or a camera’s pop-up Commander like the D90, D300, D700) communicating with the remote flashes in channels/groups, then the preflashes are used to communicate between Commander/Remotes and can’t be turned off. However, there is a great workaround solution that is called FV Lock. You can program one of your camera’s buttons to activate the FV Lock function so that when you press the button, it causes all the flashes in the system to do the preflash at that moment. Then, the camera remembers the Flash Value (FV) and allows you to take the real shot without the preflashes. I do this when photographing pets or kids with fast reflexes who are prone to blinking. To program the FV-Lock capability into your camera, you’ll need to go to your Custom Settings Menu (the pencil icon) and find the FV Lock menu item. On some Nikon models like the D70/D80/D90 you can program the AE-L/AF-L button to activate FV Lock. On other Nikon models like the D300/D700/D3/D90, you can program the Func button or the AE-L/AF-L button to activate FV Lock.

Charles Strong (cwstrong) on July 3, 2013

I found this on the web: The answer to Morton’s question is to use the FV Lock function built into your Nikon dSLR. Everyone needs to know that using Nikon flashes in TTL or TTL BL or even Manual will always result in pre flashes if you are operating in the Nikon CLS. What I mean is that if you have an SB-800 Commander (or a camera’s pop-up Commander like the D90, D300, D700) communicating with the remote flashes in channels/groups, then the preflashes are used to communicate between Commander/Remotes and can’t be turned off. However, there is a great workaround solution that is called FV Lock. You can program one of your camera’s buttons to activate the FV Lock function so that when you press the button, it causes all the flashes in the system to do the preflash at that moment. Then, the camera remembers the Flash Value (FV) and allows you to take the real shot without the preflashes. I do this when photographing pets or kids with fast reflexes who are prone to blinking. To program the FV-Lock capability into your camera, you’ll need to go to your Custom Settings Menu (the pencil icon) and find the FV Lock menu item. On some Nikon models like the D70/D80/D90 you can program the AE-L/AF-L button to activate FV Lock. On other Nikon models like the D300/D700/D3/D90, you can program the Func button or the AE-L/AF-L button to activate FV Lock.

Alan Dooley (ajdooley) on July 3, 2013

Awarded for his frequent encouraging comments, sharing his knowledge in the Nikonians spirit. Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2017 Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the 2017-2018 fundraising campaign

My impression was that the button shown in the graphic is the Fn button and can be assigned a number of functions. Do we have to "assign" this Focus Value Lock to it? This look like a wonderful use for it!

Gustaf Risling (nussika) on July 3, 2013

Absolutely news to me - thanks - I'll try it soon!

Jackie Donaldson (bhpr) on July 3, 2013

I never knew this. I will have to try it now :) Thanks!

Bill McGrath (wfmcgrath3) on July 2, 2013

It might be a good idea to explain how to access the FV lock feature using one of the buttons configured in the menus. I realize it differs a little bit from camera to camera, but it would provide a starting point to people who have never used it.

Tom Feazel (tfeazel) on July 1, 2013

Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014

I use a Metz SCA 3000 system flash. Does this flash work in a similar manner?

Keith Blott (kblott) on July 1, 2013

Thank you! :)

Zita Kemeny (zkemeny) on July 1, 2013

Good tips. Thanks.

G