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Lens Reviews Accessories Reviews

FTZ & TC compatibility for Nikon, Kenko, Sigma, Tamron & Tokina

Brian Tilley (briantilley)


Keywords: teleconverter, charts, nikkor, nikon, tamron, sigma, kenko, compatibility, ftz

Will my teleconverter work with this lens?

Some of the more common questions regarding Nikon cameras and lenses are "Will my lens work with teleconverter?" or "Which lens can I use with the FTZ mount adapter?"

To give you answer to such questions, the Nikonians Team has create this TC compatibility chart (downloadable as PDF).

In addition, we have compiled a section on using the FTZ mount adapter with various lenses on your Nikon Z-series camera.

Nikon Teleconverters - Image courtesy of Nikon Corp.

Nikon Teleconverters. Image courtesy Nikon Corporation.

Tele converter usage

Teleconverters (“converters” or “TC’s”) are a relatively inexpensive way of extending the focal length, and hence the range, of an existing lens. However, their usage comes at a price in performance terms. Typically, AF speed may be reduced, and any tendency of the lens to “hunt” may increase. Image quality (resolution and contrast) is likely to be degraded somewhat. Lastly, an inevitable result of using any converter is a lessening of light transmission, and hence a darker viewfinder:

  • a 1.4x converter will lose 1 EV (1 stop) of light; an f/2.8 lens becomes an f/4 combination
  • a 1.7x converter will lose 1.5 stops of light; an f/2.8 lens becomes an f/4.7 combination
  • a 2x converter will lose 2 stops of light; an f/2.8 lens becomes an f/5.6 combination
  • a 3x converter will lose 3 stops of light; an f/2.8 lens becomes an f/8 combination.

Teleconverters with long lenses

We have an article where we are trying out some long lenses with a couple of different TC's.  TC's and long lenses - How well does that work?

Michelle Valberg, Nikon Canada Ambassador that we had as a guest in our webinar is using long lenses with TC's on her Nikon Z6 and Nikon Z7. Might be interesting to watch.

 

Question about teleconverters

You are most welcome to ask any question regarding your specific lens-teleconverter combination you may have in our Lens Accessories forum. Enjoy!

 

More on converters

Converters are designed to be used on longer focal length lenses. Prime lenses under about 100mm, zooms shorter than about 70-200mm, and “superzooms” like an 18-200mm, tend to give poorer results with converters.

The Nikon MF converters have limitations as to which focal lengths they can be used on. The TC-14A, TC-200 and TC-201 are intended for lenses of 200mm and less; the TC-14B, TC-300 and TC-301 are intended for lenses of 300mm and more.

Not all lenses will physically fit all converters. If the converter has a protruding front element, and/or the lens has a non-recessed rear element, attempting to mount the converter could damage both it and the lens. The Nikon TC-300 and TC-301 are good examples. Nikonians cannot be held responsible for any damage caused by mounting any converter on any lens.

Converters transmit various signals between the lens and camera using electrical contacts. 10 contacts are currently required for full operation, including autofocus and VR/OS/VC functions where the lens has them, with Nikon AF cameras. Autofocus is transmitted using the electrical contacts for AF-S, AF-I, HSM and USD lenses, or through a mechanical clutch known colloquially as “screwdriver” for other AF lenses. Nikon’s TC-xxE, TC-xxE II and TC-xxE III converters, as well as newer Sigma EX DG TC’s, do not have the “screwdriver” clutch. Some older 3rd Party converters such as the Kenko Teleplus MC4 and MC7 lack the contacts for AF-S/AF-I/HSM/USD lenses. Stopping down of the lens diaphragm is achieved via a mechanical linkage (which often rattles!).

If a VR/OS/VC lens will autofocus with a particular converter and camera combination, then in general VR/OS/VC will also work. If a lens will meter with a particular camera, then in general metering will also work with a converter attached.

Nikon’s TC-xxE, -II and -III converters have a tab on the front mounting ring that prevents them being mounted on anything but the longer “pro” Nikkor AF-S and AF-I lenses. It is possible to remove the tab with a grinding tool, but Nikonians cannot be held responsible for any damage caused by doing so.

Tamron SP Pro converters are functionally the same as the equivalent Kenko Pro 300 converters; any differences are cosmetic only. The Nikon TC-xxE and TC-xxE II converters have only cosmetic differences, but TC-xxE III converters have a new optical formula.

Nikon USA has a page on how to use your Nikon Teleconverters.

 

Common teleconverter combinations

There are many common teleconverter combinations. We often see Kenko converters being used with Nikkor, Tamron or Sigma lenses on Nikon cameras. For many of us, Nikon TC's are reference and are then used with Nikkor glass. If you have found that a certain combinations works well, or poorly, please report that in our Lens Accessories forum as we are updating the chart from time to time.

 

Using the FTZ on your Nikon Z-series camera

Many of us using the Z series cameras also use the FTZ adapter to be able to utilize our great F-mount Nikkor glass. Doing that and we get the silent shooting and in-camera image stabilization (IBIScapability of the Z-series. 

To start using the FTZ adapter, first make sure you have the latest firmware in your camera. You need to use firmware V1.10 or later for your Nikon Z7ii or Z6ii. 

After that, update the firmware in the FTZ mount adapter. As a third step, ensure you have the latest firmware - if any available - for your lens.

 

FTZ Nikkor F mount compatibility

According to Nikon the following Nikkor F-mount lens types are compatible with Nikon Z7, Z7ii, Z6, Z6ii, Z5 and Z50 using the FTZ mount adapter. Currently over 90 Nikkor lenses are fully compatible with the Z series using the FTZ. And, in case you wondered, no, you cannot use the FTZ on your Nikon 1 camera, nor 1 Nikkor glass with it. The FTZ adapter is for the Z-series cameras only, making it possible to use F-mount Nikkors.

Type of lens Focus Mode Shooting Mode
AF MF
(With electronic rangefinder)
MF AUTO, P, S A, M
Auto Focus (AF) With CPU AF-S Type G, E, and D
AF-P Type G and E
AF-I Type D
YES YES YES YES YES
AF Type G and D NO YES YES YES YES
Other AF Lenses NO NO YES YES YES
Manual Focus (MF) With CPU PC-E NIKKOR Series,
PC NIKKOR 19mm f/4E ED
NO NO YES YES YES
PC Micro 85mm f/2.8D NO NO YES NO YES*
AI-P Lenses NO NO YES YES YES
Non CPU AI- , AI-Modified
NIKKOR or Nikon Series
E Lenses
NO NO YES NO YES

* = Only Manual "M" Mode

Exposure metering is available for all lens types listed.

 

FTZ and Tamron lenses

The FTZ adapter is also compatible with many non-Nikon lenses such as the following lenses from Tamron (as per November 2020). Make sure you have updated your Tamron lens with the Tamron software TAP-in Console prior of using the FTZ.

  • SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A041): Serial number 004219 or higher or firmware 2.0 or higher
  • SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A032): From serial number 040912 resp. firmware 2.0
  • SP 70-200mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A025): Serial number 059178 or higher or firmware 2.0 or higher
  • SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD G2 (Model A022): From serial number 035591 or firmware 2.0
  • 17-35mm F/2.8-4 Di OSD (Model A037): From serial number 006446 or firmware 2.0
  • 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (Model B028): From serial number 052673 or firmware 2.0
  • 35-150mm F/2.8-4 Di VC OSD (Model A043): All serial numbers compatible
  • SP 35mm F/1.4 Di USD (Model F045): All serial numbers are compatible.
  • SP 35mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F012): Firmware 3.0 and higher
  • 70-210mm F/4 Di VC USD (Model A034): Firmware 2.0 and higher
  • SP 85mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F016): Firmware 4.0 and higher
  • 100-400mm F/4.5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A035): Firmware 3.0 and higher
  • SP 15-30mm F/2.8 Di VC USD (Model A012): update only via Tamron Service
  • 10-24mm F/3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD (Model B023): Firmware 2.0 and higher
  • SP 45mm F/1.8 Di VC USD (Model F013): Firmware 2.0 and higher
  • SP 90mm F/2.8 Di MACRO 1:1 VC USD (Model F004): update only via Tamron Service
  • SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD (Model A011): update only via Tamron Service MF only

 

FTZ and Sigma lenses

Make sure you have the latest firmware available for your Sigma lens. Use the Sigma Optimization Pro software (ensure you are using the latest version) to update the firmware in your lens via the Sigma USB Dock or the mount converter.

According to Sigma, this is the current compatibility list where autofocus and exposure works as expected:

  • SIGMA 12-24mm F4 DG HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 14-24mm F2.8 DG HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports
  • SIGMA APO 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
  • SIGMA APO 70-300mm F4-5.6 DG MACRO
  • SIGMA 70-300mm F4-5.6 DG MACRO
  • SIGMA 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary
  • SIGMA 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM | Sports
  • SIGMA 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary
  • SIGMA 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Sports
  • SIGMA APO 200-500mm F2.8 / 400-1000mm F5.6 EX DG
  • SIGMA APO 300-800mm F5.6 EX DG HSM
  • SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 20mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 24mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 105mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 500mm F4 DG OS HSM | Sports
  • SIGMA MACRO 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
  • SIGMA APO MACRO 150mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
  • SIGMA APO MACRO 180mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
 
Sigma DC lenses with FTZ
  • SIGMA 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC HSM
  • SIGMA 10-20mm F3.5 EX DC HSM
  • SIGMA 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM
  • SIGMA 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
  • SIGMA 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
  • SIGMA 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM
  • SIGMA 18-300mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
  • SIGMA 50-100mm F1.8 DC HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 4.5mm F2.8 EX DC CIRCULAR FISHEYE HSM
  • SIGMA 10mm F2.8 EX DC FISHEYE HSM
  • SIGMA 30mm F1.4 DC HSM | Art

 

Furthermore, the following Sigma lenses can be used with the FTZ adapter, but without the possibility to turn off(!) the in-camera stabilization and the auto power-off function can not be used. You need to manually turn the power off after shooting.

  • SIGMA 17-50mm F2.8 EX DC OS HSM
  • SIGMA 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
  • SIGMA 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM | Contemporary
  • SIGMA 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC MACRO OS HSM
  • SIGMA 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM | Art
  • SIGMA 17-70mm 2.8-4 DC MACRO OS HSM
  • SIGMA 18-50mm F2.8-4.5 DC OS HSM
  • SIGMA 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM
  • SIGMA 18-250mm F3.5-6.3 DC OS HSM
  • SIGMA 50-200mm F4-5.6 DC OS HSM
  • SIGMA 70-300mm F4-5.6 DG OS

 

Tokina lenses and the FTZ adapter

These current Tokina lenses can be used on the Nikon Z series of cameras with the FTZ adapter (tested by Tokina with the Z7, Z6 and the Z50)

  • Tokina opera 50mm F1.4 FF - Potential issue: AF might be slower than normal
  • Tokina AT-X 70-200 F4 FX VCM-S (70-200mm f/4) - Issue: Shows AF error warning and can only be used in manual focus (MF) mode
  • Tokina atx-i 100mm F2.8 FF MACRO - Only MF
  • Tokina AT-X M100 PRO D Macro (100mm f/2.8) - Only MF
  • Tokina AT-X 107 f/3.5-4.5 DX NH Fisheye (10-17mm) - Only MF
  • Tokina AT-X 107 f/3.5-4.5 DX Fisheye (10-17mm) - Only MF

 

According to Tokina the following lenses can be used with AF with the FTZ:

  • AT-X16-28 F2.8 PRO FX
  • AT-X17-35 F4 PRO FX
  • AT-X24-70 F2.8 PRO FX
  • opera 16-28mm F2.8 FF
  • AT-X124 F4 PRO DX Ⅱ
  • AT-X116 F2.8 PRO DX Ⅱ 
  • AT-X116 F2.8 PRO DX V
  • atx-i11-16mmF2.8 CF
  • AT-X12-28 F4 PRO DX
  • AT-X11-20 F2.8 PRO DX
  • atx-i11-20mm F2,8 CF
  • AT-X14-20 F2 PRO DX
 
 
These Tokina lenses can be used with the FTZ, but only with MF:
  • AT-X70-200 F4 PRO FX
  • AT-XM100 F2.8 PRO D
  • AT-X840D F4.5-5.6 PRO
  • atx-i 100mmF2.8 Macro FF
  • AT-X107 F3.5-4.5 DX Fish Eye NH
  • opera 50mm F1.4 (no aperture control via camera)

 

Using Zeiss and FTZ adapter

Using your manual focus Zeiss lenses with CPU (ZF.2 line), such as the Milvus or Otus series should work fine and older Zeiss as well, but these non-cpu lenses have limited functionality (e.g. no aperture indication in camera and no aperture control on the camera). To our knowledge, Zeiss have no plans to provide native Z series mount lenses as is.

 

Using the FTZ with a TC

Some members have reported they are using a Nikon TC 1.4 or Kenko TC 1.4, e.g. the Kenko 1.4x DG 300 together with the FTZ and that it works with for example a Nikkor 200-500mm or a Nikkor 300 f/4E PF. "Works" in this case does not equal to "no issues whatsoever" and potentially you will experience degraded AF speed and corner quality may suffer.

 

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Not what you were looking for?

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(17 Votes )

Originally written on April 22, 2014

Last updated on January 24, 2021

Brian Tilley Brian Tilley (briantilley)

Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014

Paignton, United Kingdom
Basic, 30235 posts

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23 comments

Robin Hancock (robBiker54) on May 12, 2020

A useful article as the conversion guide is very handy. I only use a Sigma TC-1401 1.4x teleconverter with the Sigma 105mm F2.8 and 100-400mm F5-6.3 lenses only as that was made as a Sigma lens specific teleconverter. I did have a Kenko Pro 300 1.4x teleconverter but with mixed results with a Nikon 70-300mm and Tamron 70-300mm lenses. Picture quality was not that great though there was a focus hunting issue at the longer zoom ends!

Michael Hurder (MKHurder) on March 18, 2019

correction: The Tamron 150-600mm G2 will have effective changes of: from f/5 to 6.3 @150mm and f/6.3 to 8.0 @600mm. My Monday Morning Math leaves much to be desired.

Michael Hurder (MKHurder) on March 18, 2019

I can't find a more recent article to research this subject. If I may, I have a Tamron 150-600 G2. I understand it is compatible with Nikon extenders, but I wonder if it's worth it for the light loss on a non-fixed aperture telephoto that starts at f/5 (effectively 5.6 with extender)? I'd love to extend my reach with the 1.4x extender to near 900mm but at an effective f/7.1 is it worth it? I already notice this glass has trouble autofocusing in low-light conditions. How about the next step up to 1.7x or 2.0x? Thanks for the rehash...

John Hernlund (Tokyo_John) on August 6, 2018

This chart seems to be missing the TC-16A (and modified versions thereof)...one of the hottest used items these days.

James Pauley (Doughboy603) on June 27, 2018

I am trying to find the teleconverter compatability chart written about by Bo Stahlbrandt (bgs)on April 29, 2014 Any help on locating it? Thanks, JP

Tomas Turnbull (N6014me) on January 14, 2018

Brian, Thanks for this article. I will start putting pennies in the jar so that I can afford that longer lens I think I need. Tom.

Lynn Watkins (LE49Wat) on April 3, 2016

I haven't used a teleconverter in a while. However, in reading this article, if I understand the article correctly, it would not be possible to mount the same converted on both an 80-200mm AF lens and the 70-300mm G lens. Interesting. I was thinking of getting one to use occasionally in landscapes, but it seems like I would have to choose a teleconverter for one lens or the other.

User on July 15, 2015

Will a TC-14A fit on Nikon 24-120 lens to extend its focal length?

Julian Aude (Oportuno) on April 30, 2015

Very useful! There is a general lack of information about tele-converters and this chart is very illustrative! Thank you very much...

Ray V Scrafield (socaltoolguy) on December 5, 2014

Please excuse my ignorance but I am new to this forum. I have a Nikon D40. I also have a Vivitar 100-300 macro zoom lense that I used on my Canon A-1. An adapter was required. I want to use this lens on my Nikon DSLR. I was told that I would need to find a Vivitar TX to Nikon T-mount adapter. Is this correct? Will the two be compatible? You might save me a lot of time and money if you can answer that question. Thanks, Ray Scrafield

dom albi (domalbi) on August 7, 2014

I have an old Nikon TC 16A what can you tell me about it?

Chris Malacarne (chris_mal) on July 25, 2014

Good day fellow Nikonians! This chart is great! Thanks to all who put forth the effort! Please chime in if you have or know of someone who has had this issue. I have a Tamron 2x n-af bbar mc7 that was working perfect on my D3 and (older 80-200 2.8). Then all of a sudden when I attach it the focus jumps from front to back...never capturing a focus point. It moves very quickly and sharp. It is like it is not even searching for focus and has gone hay wire! Has any one had this happen? I have tried other lenses...same thing. Other bodies (D90)...same thing. I am 99% sure the tamron 2x mc7 has crapped out on me I am just looking to confirm this and the next question is where to get it fixed? Thanks

Dale Maas (marnigirl) on June 3, 2014

Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Ribbon awarded for his generous contribution to the 2017-2018 fundraising campaign

Disregard my query submitted on 2 June. According to Nikon's website the TC-17E II is NOT compatible with a Nikon 70-300mm lens AF-S lens. Dale

Raj Milan (s3191384) on June 3, 2014

A handy piece of information for first time buyers!

Dale Maas (marnigirl) on June 2, 2014

Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Ribbon awarded for his generous contribution to the 2017-2018 fundraising campaign

Ref: Lynn comment dated 9 May 2014 I also have a 70-300 AF-S. I cannot mount it to my TC-17EII. Unless I have misunderstood something, according to the chart they should be compatible. Any feedback appreciated. Dale aka Marnigirl

Lynn Gemeinhart (absaroka1) on May 9, 2014

Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Ribbon awarded for his very generous contribution to the 2017 fundraising campaign. Ribbon awarded for her generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2017

I love this chart. I have wanted a teleconverter to help reach the long shots. According to the chart, an AF-S lens should be compatable with the TC-20E II. I have an AF-S Nikkor 70-300. I cannot get the lens to mount onto the teleconverter. I am using a D600. Am I misreading the chart? I don't wish to damage either one by forcing them.

User on May 6, 2014

Great chart. very helpful indeed.

Bo Stahlbrandt (bgs) on April 29, 2014

One of the two c-founders, expert in several areas Awarded for his valuable Nikon product reviews at the Resources

The downloadable chart has now been updated with the latest models.

Bo Stahlbrandt (bgs) on April 24, 2014

One of the two c-founders, expert in several areas Awarded for his valuable Nikon product reviews at the Resources

David; Will ping the team on this and ask for update re TC-20E III.

David B Arkin (sazerac_the_dog) on April 23, 2014

I notice that in your chart you list the : Nikon TC-20E Nikon TC-20E II but do not the latest TC-20E III. I would have hoped you included the better III in comparisons. Is this omission on purpose or a "typing" error. Thanks for the information. David

KENT M. WHITNEY (KMWHITNEY) on April 23, 2014

Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015

Thank You, I discovered some years back (1964) if I wanted maximum compatibility, performance and quality, I married only Nikon to Nikkor and solved all the issues with one exception, "Cost"! If one wants the best product, engineered to work at the best Nikon engineered performance, bite the bullet and stay Nikon throughout! Thank you for the review, well worth the read and refresher, short and to the point! V/R The PhotogDog (Kent)

Zita Kemeny (zkemeny) on April 23, 2014

Good to know this. Thanks :-)

Russ Kitchen (kayakers11) on April 22, 2014

Wonderful! I was looking for a chart like this & the usage info is a plus...thanks so much!

G