Even though we ARE Nikon lovers,we are NOT affiliated with Nikon Corp. in any way.

The new Nikon Z50 has been announced. More info

X


Sign up Login
Home Forums Articles Galleries Members Galleries Master Your Vision Galleries 5Contest Categories 5Winners Galleries 5ANPAT Galleries 5 The Winners Editor's Choice Portfolios Recent Photos Search Contest Info Help News Newsletter Join us Renew Membership About us Retrieve password Contact us Contests Vouchers Wiki Apps THE NIKONIAN™ For the press Fundraising Search Help!
More5

Camera Reviews Videos

Nikon D750 Review - More Than an Update

Joseph Gamble (JCGamble)


Keywords: d750, comparison

Making its US trade show debut at Photo Plus Expo in New York, Nikon’s newest full frame DSLR, the D750, wasn’t named the D710 for an obvious reason. It’s not an update to the D700 but a new, robust 24.3-megapixel camera with a variety of integrated technologies that slightly improve upon the specifications of its little brother — the Nikon D610.

 

Ergonomics

Let’s start with the feel of the camera. Closer in size to the D610 but 100 grams lighter, the camera is solidly balanced on a 600-series chassis but the  major tangible physical difference is the articulating LCD screen. Flexible, although restricted to tilting upward or downward on one axis, the 3.2 inch, 1.299k LCD is ideal for Hail Mary overhead shots, waist-level street shooting or high-end video production. Once only the province of the prosumer cameras, this style of articulating LCD, when used in tandem with LiveView or situations when the camera is mounted on a steadicam or track, is a worthy, functional stylistic design.  

(Left to Right) Nikon D810, D750 and D610

Audio/Video

If you are working with motion, the D750 is equipped with powered aperture during live view and video mode. This feature, alongside with the camera’s ability to capture 1920x1080 resolution at customizable frame rates of 60/30/28 frames per second (fps), places the 750 squarely in the same professional class as the Nikon D810 or Nikon D4s

The D750's innovative new articulating LCD

During video capture, you can now expect a better audio track than in the D610, as the camera features a stereo microphone and headphone jack similar to the D810. Features like “Frequency Response” and “Wind Noise Reduction” in the Movie Shooting Menu are a boon to mitigating invasive audio and wind hissing when harvesting audio tracks.

When working with video, an on screen histogram, zebra lines and Auto-ISO help to insure a well-balanced exposure with usable highlight details. If you are planning to handle your color grading in a linear editing tool like Adobe Premiere or Apple’s Final Cut, you can select “Flat” in the picture control and minimize in-capture color processing.

 

 

Everything “I” Want

A new navigation innovation that is highly useful in real shooting conditions is the “I” button, which appears at the bottom left side on the camera back. It’s a quick entry into a menu system that is both logical and efficient. Truly, it seems to provide fingertip access to everything you need on the fly — image area, frame rate, video dimensions, wind noise reduction, headphone volume.

The "I" button at the lower left of the camera back

WIFI Integration

One of my personal misgivings with regard to my D810 is the frames per second (fps) when hammering on the shutter button. Thought not quite in the range of the high fps of action cameras, the 6.5 fps of the D750 is respectable but barely an upgrade to the 6 fps of the 610’s speed performance with continuous shooting.

The D750 with the new 20mm/1.8 Nikkor lens

While Nikon’s WU-1b was not a major cosmetic hindrance to incorporating Wi-Fi into the D610, the D750’s WIFI nicely integrates into the camera directly. An option that required secondary accessories in predecessors like the D4s, WIFI integration is a hallmark of the 750. Working in tandem with Nikon Wireless Mobile Utility on a phone or tablet, you can easily trigger the shutter remotely and then share images electronically.  

 

Time Lapse

When shooting intervalometer in the service of time-lapse photography, you now have Exposure Smoothing in camera and it makes a huge difference. Difficulties often associated with flickering in your transitions when combining these timed images are minimized as a result of Exposure Smoothing.

Time lapse of Mt. Sopris, Colorado captured and processed in camera with the D750 (by Seth Andersen)

 

Bottom Lining It

The tendency is always there to make bold, swaggering statements about a camera being a “game-changer” and radically altering the digital camera landscape. It can be argued that Nikon’s D750 doesn’t rise to the level of “game-changer” in the way that the D3 pushed the low-light envelope or the D800 pushed the megapixel count. But it is, nonetheless, a terrific camera.

Overhead view of the D750 with the new 20mm/1.8 Nikkor lens

If you’re a committed still photographer and uninterested in using a DSLR’s motion capabilities, then the D750 qualifies as a slight upgrade relative to the D610. There are marked improvements for still shooters — longer battery life with the EN-EL15, a half-frame faster per second as the camera boasts the same Expeed 4 processor that appears in the D810 and D4s. A few other comparative notables include an expandable High ISO range that pushes it to 51,200, USB3.0 connectivity, a true improvement in the Autofocus (AF) system, especially in low-light, built-in WIFI and, of course, the articulating LCD.

These photographic enhancements alone may not be enough to compel you to sell your D610. If, however, you are a hybrid shooter looking to ramp up your video production with a compact DSLR capable of professional audio/video, then the D750 is a compelling storytelling tool that belongs in your camera kit.

 

Further details and discussions

We are discussing the Nikon D750 in our dedicated forum.

 

(28 Votes )

Originally written on October 29, 2014

Last updated on February 23, 2016

Joseph Gamble Joseph Gamble (JCGamble)

Glenwood Springs, USA
Basic, 18 posts

14 comments

John D. Roach (jdroach) on June 13, 2015

Fellow Ribbon awarded. John exhibits true Nikonian spirit by frequently posting images and requesting comments and critique, which he graciously accepts. He is an inspiration to all of us through constant improvement in his own work, keen observations and excellent commentary on images posted by others. Donor Ribbon. Awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his most generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2017 Ribbon awarded for his generous contribution to the 2019 Fundraising campaign

I can't agree with the less then favorable accounts regarding the D750. It is a fine, and let me say it seems robust camera without a lot of heft and weight. I am delighted with mine and I appreciate this article. I know I was at first less then enthusiastic about the D750 not being like the D700 for I liked the controls of the D700, but I have a D800 and can still experience those types of controls. I had a D7000 and D600 which have similar controls to the D750 (before trading them in with the D700 to get the D750. Both the D750 and D800 are fine ways to experience photography. I am now a strong advocate for the D750.

Daniel Ryan (Dan Ryan) on November 15, 2014

Very good, to-the-point, review. You didn't mention the lack of separate AF-ON button. It's my main focus method and too bad Nikon couldn't have kept it in this camera.

Dr. Patrick Buick (profpb) on November 12, 2014

This is the information and candid evaluation I was looking for. I wanted something lighter weight than my D800e but giving up the pixel count is not a good trade off. I wanted the WiFi built-in but this is minor, so I'll just go on with my current gem. ~Doc

Zita Kemeny (zkemeny) on November 11, 2014

Nice review with relevant details.

Ronald J. Sacco (Priest) on November 9, 2014

Definite eye opener. Thank you. Ron

Andrew Fishkin (asiafish) on November 8, 2014

Less is more for me with regard to camera weight. I do mostly travel photography and if a camera or lens is too big or heavy, it stays home. D750 looks like a great body. I shoot a Df myself, but could see getting one of these if I ever needed a more robust AF system.

Joseph Gamble (JCGamble) on November 6, 2014

Thanks everyone for the kind words on the article. Lots of interesting comments on the body style of the camera. Given the trend with high resolution mirrorless cameras and the buzz about them being a "DSLR killer," I'm unsurprised by Nikon's decision to try and keep the cameras with a smaller body style. That is purely speculation on my part.

Cheryl Tadin (ctadin) on November 5, 2014

Joseph, Thanks for the great and informative article on the D750. I also am in the camp where I would have preferred a much larger body type, something similar to the D700.

Darrell Young (DigitalDarrell) on November 5, 2014

Founding Member of the Nikonians writer Guild. Author of most of the NikoniansPress books. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Darrell offers expert advice as the author of several Nikonians Press Books.

Interesting article Joseph. I like your writing style. Very informative and easy to read. Welcome to the Nikonians Writer's Guild.

Joseph De Marco (oldpro) on November 4, 2014

When I heard about the introduction of the D750 I was very happy to hear they had updated it until I actually saw the camera. I expected to see that well built larger type of body with improvements. I've heard the Nikon rep say that this is what photographers want. Well most of my friends want a larger more heavy duty body to handle and not these compact bodies that it seems Nikon wants to turn out. This camera should have been named a D650.

Kent Lewis (nkcllewis) on November 3, 2014

Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2017

Joe, thank you for a great review. My only comment is to express more than slight disappointment that the D750 did not come with the same body style of the D700/D800. I'm all for the nimble photographer considerations, that smaller and lighter is better, but not for pro-level DSLRs where weight and heft can actually facilitate stabilization of the camera when taking handheld images. So I was surprised that Nikon downgraded their D750 body from the D700/800 style to the smaller, less robust D7000/D610 body style. The ergonomics, less weight, and that the body is less robust, are the main reason that I'm not considering an upgrade from the D610 to the D750. What was Nikon thinking? Kent in VA

Richard Luse (DaddySS) on October 31, 2014

Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Ribbon awarded for  his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2017 Ribbon awarded for his generous contribution to the 2019 Fundraising campaign

Thanks, very informative and balanced.

Andrew Fishkin (asiafish) on October 30, 2014

Great review. With any luck, this camera will push D610 prices down.

John D. Roach (jdroach) on October 29, 2014

Fellow Ribbon awarded. John exhibits true Nikonian spirit by frequently posting images and requesting comments and critique, which he graciously accepts. He is an inspiration to all of us through constant improvement in his own work, keen observations and excellent commentary on images posted by others. Donor Ribbon. Awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his most generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2017 Ribbon awarded for his generous contribution to the 2019 Fundraising campaign

Nicely well balanced review.

G