Even though we ARE Nikon lovers,we are NOT affiliated with Nikon Corp. in any way.

 As a Platinum or Gold member you can have your best work being showcased at Nikonians at high resolution to make it look great under an easy to remember Internet address with contact possibility.
 There is no limit to the number of images you can store in your portfolio, but we recommend that you include your very best work only. Your portfolio cover image is also included on the Nikonians homepage, gallery homepage and the portfolio index page.   >>> Learn how to set up your own portfolio

X

Sign up Login
Home Forums Articles Galleries Members Galleries Master Your Vision Galleries 5Contest Categories 5Winners Galleries 5ANPAT Galleries 5 The Winners Editor's Choice Portfolios Recent Photos Search Contest Info Help News Newsletter Join us Renew membership About us Retrieve password Contact us Contests Vouchers Wiki Apps THE NIKONIAN™ For the press Fundraising Search Help!
More5

How-to's

Digital Infrared Photography – A Brief Introduction

Dan Wiedbrauk (domer2760)


Keywords: infrared, filter, digital, camera, conversion, photography, lenses, nikkor, nikon, wratten, hoya, heliopan, lifepixel

Infrared or ‘IR’ photography is a small but growing photographic niche that allows photographers of all abilities and budgets to expand their skills, augment their artistic vision, and create unexpected and exciting images that cannot be captured in other ways.  For the landscape photographer, IR photographs capture surreal images hallmarked by white foliage and dark skies – images that are at once familiar and unfamiliar.  With a few manipulations, the sky can be blue and the foliage can be golden, lavender, or red.  Black and white IR landscapes are striking even when the trees are bare. 

image_01

Backyard
Nikon D90 IR-converted (850nm Deep Infrared conversion)
20mm f/2.8 AF-D Nikkor, f/5.6, 1/200 sec, +1 EV, ISO 200
Click for a larger image.

 

To read the rest of the article, please log in. This article is available to all Silver, Gold and Platinum Nikonians members. If you are not registered yet, please do so. To discover the world of Nikonians and the advantages of being a registered member, take our short discovery tour.

More articles by Dan Wiedbrauk

More... More...

9 comments

Dr. Patrick Buick (profpb) on November 8, 2015

My D70 is a great body. After the D7000, then D800e and D750, it was not being used and had little resale value. The Hoya filter was sold to offset the conversion cost. My kit lens (AF-S Nikkor 18-70mm G ED) is automatically calibrated to this camera and did not have to be send in to LifePixel for modification. I selected the Super Color Filter because I can always convert to B&W in Photoshop as well as choosing any further color modifications in the post-processing software. I always shoot RAW to choose the best WB after the shot. With my D70-IR body and the dedicated lens, focus and composition is not an concern, and the tripod and remote are optional -- not absolutely required. Do I sound satisfied?

Gary Robertson (Gary Robertson) on October 31, 2015

What company do you recommend to convert the camera?

Dan Wiedbrauk (domer2760) on October 23, 2015

Fellow Ribbon awarded for his frequent assistance to other members by sharing his perspective, skills and expertise, especially with infrared and macro photography. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Awarded for his expertise in IR & Macro photography Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015

LiveView may not work when using screw-on IR filters. It works great for IR-converted cameras.

Dan Wiedbrauk (domer2760) on October 23, 2015

Fellow Ribbon awarded for his frequent assistance to other members by sharing his perspective, skills and expertise, especially with infrared and macro photography. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Awarded for his expertise in IR & Macro photography Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015

Yes, there can be focusing issues. However any reputable conversion company will be able to correct for the differences in refraction, at least at focal distances near the calibration point. To your point, yes, LiveView is able to focus even when using uncorrected cameras and lenses. This is because the LiveView autofocus engine uses a contrast detection AF system that interrogates the image on the sensor rather than basing the focus point on the information from the (visible light) phase detection AF sensor. This can be a lifesaver. LiveView allows you to autofocus or manually focus the lens. The downside to LiveView focusing is that the focusing is much slower than autofocus with the normal phase detection engine. The upside is that you can zoom in with LiveView and get a really sharp image at any focal length. It's a huge help when doing macro IR photography.

John Hernlund (Tokyo_John) on October 22, 2015

One issue is that lens elements do not refract IR light the same as visible light, and there might be some issues to contend with in focusing. Probably some lenses are better than others. I am thinking about converting a D90, same as you did, and I am wondering if you have been able to use LiveView focusing at all, or is focusing simply not an option given the small luminance of IR?

Philip Coleman (philcoleman) on October 21, 2015

You can convert an old body to one with no internal filters. Then with an IR passing filter on the lens, you are taking IR photos. With a visible only filter (like the Tiffen 812) on the lens, you can take visible light photos as with the unmodified camera.

John D. Roach (jdroach) on October 20, 2015

Fellow Ribbon awarded. John exhibits true Nikonian spirit by frequently posting images and requesting comments and critique, which he graciously accepts. He is an inspiration to all of us through constant improvement in his own work, keen observations and excellent commentary on images posted by others. Donor Ribbon. Awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his most generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2017

Nice introduction, Dan

User on October 19, 2015

Great article, thank you. I have recently been using a Hoya IR72 on both my Nikon D800E and Fuji X-T 1. It works very well on both cameras, but I think the Fuji sensor is more sensitive than Nikon as a successful exposure takes around 10-25 seconds on the Fuji, whereas it takes up to 50 secs on the Nikon. Following your article I can see lots of folks having fun with IR. Thanks for posting. Richard

Kathy Cavallaro (Cavy2) on October 19, 2015

Awarded for her continuing willingness to keep on learning and to share her knowledge with others in the Nikonians spirit

Well written Dan! How about some information on processing the images?

G