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D600 sensor resolution

briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

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"RE: D600 sensor resolution"

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Mon 17-Sep-12 04:22 PM

>>>I think FX files are generally of higher quality as
>they
>Ultimately you're magnifying your output less from an FX sensor...

Perhaps we should define what we mean by "enlargement" before we go any further...

Once a digital image is stored, it has no real physical dimensions (length, height) - only pixel dimensions. The traditional view on enlargement was the ratio of negative size to print size - both had physical dimensions, so it was easy to say that a 35mm negative (approximately 1.5 x 1 inch) printed at 6 x 4 inches involved a linear enlargement of 4x, or 16x in area.

Now in the digital age, the thing that matters most for resolution (the original question here) is pixels per inch. A digital file of 3000 x 2000 pixels (6 MP) can be printed to 10 x 6.7 inches at 300 ppi - and that is true whether the original sensor was DX or FX.

>...so forget about the idea that larger photosites are what
>made D700 better.

What makes the D800 equal to or better than the D700 in image quality is the newer technology of the sensor and firmware. If you're comparing the same generation of sensor and firmware, larger photosites do help. The D700 outperformed the D300 (both 12MP) in low light chiefly because of its larger photosites.

>Shoot the same subject with the same lens on an FX camera, and
>now you need to crop deeper to get the same framing.

You have to crop more of the scene away, yes, but which will turn out better depends on the pixel density. Comparing a D800 and D7000 in your scenario, for example, you'll have roughly the same amount of pixels on the subject - or the same "resolution". Both could be printed the same size and show about the same level of detail.

This is all very complex, and there are many ways to look at the issue...

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

This is a hot, active topic! D600 sensor resolution [View all] , PRW Silver Member , Mon 17-Sep-12 06:39 AM
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