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Ferguson

Cape Coral, US
5701 posts

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"RE: D800 weatherproofing"

Ferguson Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for the generous sharing of his high level expertise in the spirit of Nikonians Nikonian since 19th Aug 2004
Sun 21-Apr-13 09:15 PM | edited Sun 21-Apr-13 09:17 PM by Ferguson

>One could shoot in the rain without a rain cover thousands of
>times and never have a problem. On the other hand, the camera
>could malfunction the first time a drop of water hits it. It
>is the luck of the draw.
>As long as a drop of water doesn't get to the wrong place at
>the wrong time, you won't have a problem. If the drop of
>water get to the electronics, the damage could be extensive.

Remember, I'm not recommending people forgo rain protection. I'm not recommending anything, just offering a data point to provide a bit of balance to the OP's.

But I will note that rain water is close to distilled in conductivity, and is darn close to not conductive. It is about 50,000 times less conductive than sea water, and probably 100 times less conductive than average tap water.

The impact of clean, non-salt water on electric circuits is generally much less than people think it is. We've been educated by decades of horror and sci-fi films that a bit of water and sparks fly (kind of like the fact that if you give a computer too hard of a problem it explodes in a similar shower of sparks ).

I'd speculate that the danger from moisture to optics and LCD's (both direct from distortion and indirect from mildew/mold) is far higher than the danger of a bit of fresh water to the electronics.

Not that it belongs inside in either case of course.

But just an idle question for consideration - ever wear a plastic poncho for a while in a hot summer day's rain? Didn't you feel like it was a sauna, and soon were as damp inside as if you had been rained on? I wonder if that zoom lens pumping the hot humid air through your camera is actually benefiting from the rain gear. I'd offer the speculation that if you really want to protect the camera from rain -- stay inside.

Linwood

Comments welcomed on pictures: Http://captivephotons.com

This is a hot, active topic! D800 weatherproofing [View all] , Phototherapy , Thu 18-Apr-13 04:02 AM
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