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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3577 posts

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"RE: what to do"

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Mon 17-Dec-12 05:53 AM

We have a few things in common. I started with digital after years of inactivity, and having used a A1 for decades. You have a distinct advantage over most who get their first DSLR, namely, knowing about the fundamentals of all photography; light, time and color which were learned from using manual focus film cameras. Most newcomers to DSLR modern cameras are trying to work out what is exposure is or what DOF is and why is it important. So you will progress very quickly, having that head start.
But the D7000 is a complex camera, there are many user adjustable parameters, any one of them can cause unexpected results. There are some terms that will be unfamiliar but all the basics are just as you would expect from using the A1. There is only one disadvantage moving from film to the D7000, manual focus is much less accurate using the viewfinder because digital cameras do not have the microprism or split screen focusing screens. MF on good film cameras was a joy, fast and accurate. The D7000 however has an answer, the LiveView that allows the rear monitor to zoom in on details for manual focus. It is used most effectively on a tripod instead of handheld.


What to do in the winter? Get gloves and scarf? Actually, indoor shooting will be more effective than you are used to with ASA 100 and 400 film. You have decent dynamic range at an equivalent ASA 6400!
But as with film, low ISO is where the camera really shines. The manual is probably enough to get you up and running. Experiment with some of the features one at a time.
The camera will become productive for you almost immediately but the second half of photography with digital is that you have to post process your files , something that most people left to developing labs in the color film days. Learning post processing can be a steep learning curve, particularly is you choose to use very comprehensive programs like Adobe PhotoShop CS6. It is as complex and powerful as you make it. Luckily there are probably 50 good books and video courses on learning to use it.
If you run into some problem that is not explained in the manual, just as on the forum. There is a lot of accumulated knowledge about the D7000 on this forum.

Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

A topic tagged as having a question what to do [View all] , littleaddictsl , Sun 16-Dec-12 02:47 AM
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