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Macro Photography Tips and Tricks

OldCodger

Sawbridgeworth Hertfordshire, UK
679 posts

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"RE: Macro Photography Tips and Tricks "

OldCodger Registered since 15th Oct 2011
Sun 06-Nov-11 09:32 AM

I recently bought a D7000, not quite the same as your camera. I had a PB4 bellow bought some time ago, (30 plus years ago?)for use with film Nikons. I also had a 105mm bellows F4 Nikor which was bought at the same time as the bellows. Both have been sealed up and stored away for well over 25 years or so having been in the Middle East, the Far East and now in the UK.
Anyway I dug them out and after rotating the camera mount to allow clearance of the camera body bulge I coupled the camera to the bellows and shot a few insurance pictures, with available light and then with multi-flash. I was pleased with these initial results. The camera took care of the stop down metering with ambient light. However, my old flashguns required the 'suck it and see approach' to exposure. At least the SB16 would fire off at the correct time and allow remote triggering of other flashes with a flash slave. (The inbuilt flash sends out its pre-flashes and resulted in missed flashes from the remotely triggered guns.) I ended up with the lens fully stopped down (F32) with the combined effects of an SB16 and a Vivitar 365 potato masher bounced round a light tent.
In part this was an experiment to see if old kit still had any life left in it.
If you go down this route, watch out for flash trigger voltages on old guns! You may have seen the warning and know all about the issue, but others may still be unaware.
Experiments were brought to a crashing stop by a problem with my leg, (I still do not know what caused/causes it and neither does anyone else). But I hope to be able to try again soon.
I realise the this is probably not what you were after, you probably have auto lenses and AF. In my 'box of unexplored bits' I do have a mounting ring that appears to operate, (memory is having a fade out moment or two) the stop down mechanism of auto-diaphragm lenses. Was that what you were referring to?
As far as I am aware there is no way to connect a modern camera to the lens through the bellows unit, but others are welcome to correct me.

Pinned topic Macro Photography Tips and Tricks [View all] , dm1dave Administrator Awarded for high level knowledge and skills in various areas, most notably in Wildlife and Landscape Writer Ribbon awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Nikonians community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 , Tue 13-Sep-11 06:35 PM
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