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Hi, New to film A few tips please.

LarryHG

Honolulu, US
48 posts

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"RE: Hi, New to film A few tips please. "

LarryHG Silver Member Nikonian since 16th Jan 2009
Fri 25-May-12 07:17 AM

Hi, Derek!

I looked at the "General" and "Equipment" information in your profile, and you seem to have some experience already in photography, not to mention a pretty nice digital SLR (the D7000)and some lenses that cover the range from moderate to telephoto focal lengths.

For Landscapes, tho', your current best lens is the 35-70mm, f/2.8 Nikkor. You might want something a little wider than that, tho', and I highly recommend a clean, used 17-35mm, f/2.8 Pro-grade wide angle. It will work well on both your F4 and the D7000, as well as any other DX- or FX-body Nikon you might upgrade to in the future.

For film reviews and recommendations, start right here in Nikonians: go to the "Film & Film Processing" Forum. You can also do a search on any film or camera or photography topic that's been discussed in the forums right here, in the window located in the upper left of your Nikonians screen.

Your first search here and online should be on the keywords "Nikon F4 reviews". Print out the better ones...there are several. You can also look for used Nikon F4 "User Guides" to purchase, but you may also find printable downloadable Guides. Look for books on the F4...some are better than others.

In addition to the Nikonians' searches, you can find a whole world of information online by doing targeted searches in Google, or maybe use a multiple-search engine like www.dogpile.com. Try various keywords or phrases (enclosed in quotes) such as: "film photography", "film reviews", or "landscape photography"..., whatever. You will be overwhelmed by all the information you can find online!

Any decent library should have some old books on Photography, and there are some very good ones out there! The basics are still the same, that is: Composition, Lighting and Exposure ("f/8 and BE THERE!"), and Processing.

If you don't want to deal with all the fuss and fumes in a darkroom, you can have the film images digitized by the Processor, or find a good dedicated film and slide scanner (NOT a flat bed scanner..., get something like the Nikon Coolscan series).

If you live too far from a place that does competent film processing, then just buy a few A&I film processing mailers from B&H (online, go to: www.BandH.com). See their ads in Popular Photography magazine.

If you want to concentrate on landscape photography, use your sharpest wide-angle lens, with the F4 mounted on a good tripod, or braced if hand held, and try Fujifilm Velvia 100 until you have shot a few rolls, then try the fabulous Velvia 50 when you feel confident that you won't be wasting the slow film on poorly exposed images.

I have two hand-held lightmeters, and one spotmeter to help in getting the exposures right when I use my older cameras, like the FM2n. But the F5 and the D2X 3D Color Matrix metering do a pretty good job without any help, so I only use the lightmeters in tricky or challenging lighting conditions. The F4 probably could use a little help, so a good light meter might be worth having.

Being located in such beautiful 'landscape' country like Utah (Bryce Canyon, etc.!), you might have a problem with slide film because of the harsh, contrasty lighting conditions. The color negative film has a better ability to capture the wider Dynamic Range of your typical outdoor lighting. If any stores in your area who do processing or printing use a Fuji Frontier 370 machine, it is capable of producing really great prints! Just make sure SOMEBODY who works there knows how to use the machine!

Have fun with your F4! It's still a great camera, especially if you have any old AI or AIS manual focus lenses. It will teach you a lot!

Let us see your film images when you get some good ones digitized!

Aloha from Hawaii!

LarryHG

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

This is a hot, active topic! Hi, New to film A few tips please. [View all] , DerekTV85 , Thu 24-May-12 11:58 PM
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