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D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds

Jim Mohundro

Seattle, US
450 posts

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Jim Mohundro Silver Member Nikonian since 23rd Jul 2008
Wed 06-Nov-13 07:09 AM

I'm getting how the best glass is a serious requirement for use of the D800 (in my contemplated move from my D700, I've posted on this forum that I would keep and continue to shoot with my 24-120 f/4 VR and 28mm f/1.8G, but perhaps unload my much older AI-s lenses, the 105 f/2.5 and 135 f/2.8). At least one poster here has supported the notion that these older AI-s lenses can still produce quality work on a D800, but given the substantial weight and majority opinion here about what appears to be an absolute necessity that top-end glass must be used, I suspect my appropriate move is to sell the AI-s lenses (perhaps to a new Df owner) and replace those lenses when I can afford to do so.

That was just the background intro to my quandry about how one must work much more carefully with the D800 to secure quality images. Thete is frequent mention of tripod use (whenever possible, it appears, for example. With the D700 and previous camera bodies, both digital and film I've always tried to be one step more conservative with shutter speed, so at, with a 50mm lens, I'd use a shutter speed of 1/125 or faster, ISO and aperture permitting (i.e., 1 divided by the product of the lens focal length and 2). using the D800, would I need to use an additional faster increment of shutter speed, say 1/250 insyead of 1/125 in the example above? Or even 1/500 to be safe? Especially with the D800e?



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GBaylis

Oakford, Devon, UK
616 posts

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#1. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

GBaylis Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Awarded for his generous and continuous sharing of his high level skills with the Nikonians community Writer Ribbon awarded for his contributions to the Nikonians Articles. Nikonian since 12th Sep 2012
Wed 06-Nov-13 07:18 AM

Jim,

Faster will always be better, but whatever speed you're going to use it's worth taking a look (or getting someone else to take a look) at your holding/stance when taking shots to ensure that you've got the steadiest release and the best technique.

I try to keep the speed above 1/125 whenever possible, especially with the superb 24-70 f2.8 as this doesn't have VR.

You'll find that the higher ISO levels on the D800 are so good that you rarely need to let the speed drop down below 1/125 though I've had plenty of very good shots at much slower speeds too.

You'll see the biggest impact of slow speeds on very complex subjects, like trees, but you'll be amazed at the resolution that the D800 gives you.

I wouldn't hold back from getting the D800 for fear of shaky shots if they are clear enough with the D700. Just spend a day experimenting to see what works best for you and what you consider to be your lowest speed. You could, if you wished, set the Auto-ISO setting to keep a high minimum speed, though keeping the ISO itself within an acceptable bracket.

Good shooting, Geoff

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Wingman

Kimberley, CA
1759 posts

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#2. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 1

Wingman Silver Member Awarded for sharing his excellent work and continued contribution to the forums, most notably at the Aviation forum. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2002
Wed 06-Nov-13 02:03 PM

Much depends on the final usage of the photograph you are shooting. I use a D3, D700 and D800. I regularly use all of the F4 trinity (16-35, 24-120, and 70-200) as well as the 24-70. I try to use a tripod most of the time, but that is obviously not always possible. Viewing at 1:1 the D800 certainly shows the effect of camera movement (and lens weaknesses!) more than the other bodies, and I'm often irritated by the weaknesses of technique this camera reveals. I find, however, that when I print letter size prints, or view full frame screen sized images, these sharpness differences disappear. Poor technique or poor conditions effect any image from any camera, but for general usage I find the D800 not particularly more demanding than the D3 for sharpness, while still giving tangible improvements in dynamic range, and shadow detail.

For big prints, or heavy cropping, or any really demanding uses I try always to use a tripod to maximise the very real improvements the D800 brings...

Neal Nurmi

---Wingman Photo---

JPJ

Toronto, CA
1327 posts

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#3. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 2

JPJ Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Aug 2009
Wed 06-Nov-13 05:51 PM

Agree, the D800 is no more prone to camera shake issues, etc. What it is capable of is displying these issues larger and therefore clearer at 100% than other DSLRs. Viewing at 100% on your monitor is very close to viewing your image as a 2 meter wide print.

Even when sharpening I only ever zoom to 50%. Further, where possible I down sample images that have any visible noise or defects and this minimally greatly improves the appearance and often masks any issues altogether.

When the D800(e) was released, as a D700 shooter I thought it meant I would have to change how I shoot to my potential detriment (thought I would need to shoot at higher shutter speeds), and the reality is I have not had to. The biggest change is that I allow myself to be more spontaneous as having all those MPs makes it easy to crop, even heavily and thus be able to produce shots you just couldn't before because you didn't have time to properly compose before taking the shot.

Jason
Jason

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mklass

Tacoma, US
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#4. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 3

mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006
Wed 06-Nov-13 10:21 PM

I will disagree with the last 2 posts. I do think the D800 demands faster shutter speeds when hand holding, unless your hands are as steady as a tripod. However, I think the OP's existing conservative method of selecting shutter speed should be sufficient.

Those 36mp were put in the camera to enable large prints or display. Much like the D3x before it, the D800 trades off that pixel count for speed, noise control and forgiveness of shooting technique.

To me, downsampling images to a smaller size, or only printing them at 8x10 or so is a waste of the camera's capabilities.

If I only owned one camera (instead of what I do own) I doubt it would be a D800. But, when you need its capabilities, it is marvelous.

Mick
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jamesvoortman

Durban, ZA
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#5. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

jamesvoortman Silver Member Nikonian since 06th Sep 2004
Fri 08-Nov-13 03:28 AM | edited Fri 08-Nov-13 03:48 AM by jamesvoortman

Two issues that prompt the use of higher shutter speeds :
1) the high resolution makes camera movements that occur during exposure more visible
2) D800 has a heavy mirror assembly - mirror slap is a definite issue. I can feel the camera move when I shoot handheld.

For handholding I use the auto ISO feature in some of my settings banks to keep my shutter speed at about 1/(2 x focal length) i.e 1/200 sec for a 100mm lens in my handheld shooting modes. This allows one to zoom in and out without constantly checking shutter speed before each shot.

I also take care to brace against solid objects or if not available, I pull my elbows in against my ribcage and extend one or both thumbs (depending size of lens) to brace against my forehead when shooting (I am a left-eye shooter - if you use right eye this might not work so well). These techniques help to stabilise the camera to my body when not using tripod. Kneeling/sitting can also help.

Finally, my settings banks are adjusted to give fast and slow tripod modes (for long lens/wildlife and wide lens/landscape respectively) as well as handholding modes for bright and poor lighting conditions.

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Wingman

Kimberley, CA
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#6. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 5

Wingman Silver Member Awarded for sharing his excellent work and continued contribution to the forums, most notably at the Aviation forum. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2002
Fri 08-Nov-13 04:02 AM

I disagree with Mick (rather hesitantly, as I very much admire his thinking and his posts). I don't handhold very much -- don't have to for a lot of the work I do -- but when appropriate I find handholding the D800 no more demanding than handholding my D700 or D3. I'm very careful to use good technique, and I do a lot of bracing when any sort of support is available, but I do all that with any camera. I also generally take duplicate exposures (often several) when forced to handhold to ensure some critically sharp shots.

I also can see a difference between a letter sized print from my D800 and one from my 12 Mp cameras. It is very subtle, and certainly not always visible, but it is there in many shots that have a lot of fine detail -- especially in the shadows. I think if I had to choose one camera from my present collection I might very well choose the D800, as much as I dearly love my D3...

As an aside, the 70-200mm F4 has remarkable VR. This lens has been pretty much married to my D800 this summer. I have no qualms whatsoever about using this combination handheld -- even at 200mm -- down to 1/125 of a second. My percentage of critically sharp shots with this combination has amazed me.

Neal Nurmi

---Wingman Photo---

Kidkett

Campo, US
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#7. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

Kidkett Silver Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 09th Apr 2010
Fri 08-Nov-13 10:56 AM

Hi Jim,

I have to agree that using a higher shutter speed will lead to better quality pictures and I try to keep it up as high as I can. Although I wouldn’t be paranoid about it as you can get pictures at lower speeds. Here is one that I took walking along the beach in North China at just about dark when the lights came on and made this picture a great opportunity. I didn’t have a tripod with me but took a few shot anyway. With a little luck, I took this with a Nikon 80-200mm f2.8 lens at f2.8, 125mm at 1/20 second and no VR on this lens. Would it been better on a tripod? Yes but you can still take pictures that can be used when in a pinch, as I much rather have used a tripod or a much faster shutter speed. All the shots I took came out about the same as this one on that evening, even with a shutter speed that should have only been used on a tripod to start with. So don’t be overly gun shy with it.

About your AI-S Lenses I would try them first and see what you think of them before replacing them as some are maybe better than you think. As for using prime lenses you are right on the mark, they really make this camera stand out. This camera also makes every lens I have ever used on it, a better lens on this camera.

Enjoy,
Bill



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ajdooley

Waterloo, US
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#8. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

ajdooley Gold Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006
Fri 08-Nov-13 12:50 PM | edited Fri 08-Nov-13 12:53 PM by ajdooley

Jim -

Obviously for sharpness, faster IS better. But I think many people look for reasons (a)to be critical of cameras they don't own and (b)for excuses for their own issues. Before anyone goes viral on me, please allow me to explain.

I held off getting a D800 because of the left focus issue, then the matter of hand holding. I had top shelf glass from my D700 days, so that was not an issue for me.

In these internet days when the world is full of comments that sound reasonable and accurate, it is easy to be critical of equipment. That's why when someone says a lens or camera is inferior, I check their equipment list first. I am not interested in regurgitation of opinions of "authorities" whose motives I not infrequently question. So before I'll take a comment on anything too seriously, I want to know a little more about the person commenting -- their equipment and maybe examples of their work, especially if they illustrate the point they are making.

Second -- let's face it. Some people can hand hold a camera at lower shutter speeds than others. I am blessed with a very steady left hand -- the one that supports the camera-lens weight. I am not claiming that everything I shoot is tack sharp. I shoot multiple frames when I am in the 1/15th - 1/60th range, especially with the non-VR 24-70. Could the images be sharper on a tripod? Perhaps. But I have some very large prints and tight crops that are very, very sharp.

So as one Nikonian advised -- try the AI-S lenses first. Consider your technique. If you are a rifle or pistol shooter, employ those techniques. Take a breath, let it part way out, squeeeeeeze the shutter. The weight of the camera-lens combination will actually steady the combination -- inertia -- up to the point at which a camera and lens are simply too heavy to hand hold. You might try comparing some hand held test shots with identical shots (shutter/f-stop) on a tripod. Unlike the film days, electrons are free. It's only your time that is being used and the return will be your being a whole LOT smarter than a lot of other people who are just repeating what they think they know.

In the end, I agree that the D800 family will produce the best images you have seen from a DSLR-lens combination, that you've ever seen. Another thread on this site opines that the D800 is not a "sports camera." I posted examples there that contradict that notion. Opinions that are isolated to cameras and lenses, without taking into consideration the photographer's technique and skill, are only opinions.

Don't let uncertainty make you sell what may be superb lenses. Try them. You may more than like them. You may LOVE them -- and they are already paid for and will not bring a great return at sale. If they perform well on a tripod -- keep them for that. Good shooting!

Alan
Waterloo, IL, USA
www.proimagingmidamerica.com

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LAMILLER

Moncks Corner, US
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#9. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 8

LAMILLER Registered since 13th Jun 2013
Fri 08-Nov-13 01:18 PM

Back in the days of film, remember film? The rule of thumb for hand held shooting was don't use a shutter speed slower than the ISO (ASA in thoes days) of the film you are using. My opinion is thast the same rule would apply to digital. A lot of camera shake in my opinion is the result of bad holding technique. On my trip to Europe this past july I say many folks taking photos with their elbow spread out like wings and their focusing hand on top of the lens. I keep my elbos tucked to my side and my focusing hand on the bottom of the lens. Additional support is always a help. The reference to shooting techniqie is also a good recommendation. Just my thoughts.

ajdooley

Waterloo, US
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#10. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

ajdooley Gold Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006
Fri 08-Nov-13 05:22 PM

And please understand all -- I'm not critical of people reporting on their own experiences with any camera, lens or combination thereof. But it seems too often, people just repeat what someone else says. Maybe some of the "authorities" are a lot smarter than me. Probably.

But this is why I ask questions of Nikonians -- they are not being paid or given gear to report their opinions.

Alan
Waterloo, IL, USA
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ajdooley

Waterloo, US
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#11. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 9

ajdooley Gold Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006
Fri 08-Nov-13 05:24 PM | edited Fri 08-Nov-13 05:26 PM by ajdooley

Larry - Remember film? Yup -- Kodachrome with an ASA of 10! And now, my spell checker doesn't even recognize the word, "Kodachrome!" I think I must be aging...

Alan
Waterloo, IL, USA
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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3573 posts

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#12. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 10

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Fri 08-Nov-13 07:07 PM

The problem and benefit of most critical reviews or rules of thumb is that they are right.....a little bit at least, sometimes very little bit.
"Only top glass should be used on a D800", well yes, to get the optimum the combination is capable of, which is actually far beyond human perception at normal viewing sizes and distances. Yes, you can see a difference between good and excellent lenses but only if you rig the test such as at 100% pixel peeping, which does not relate much to photography at all. But what about using less than stellar lenses, is the D800 going to suddenly explode into flames or the shutter refuse to trigger with inferior light patterns passing through it? Of course those people claiming only top glass will do, forget to mention that ANY lens you have will work the best it ever has when used on these new high res cameras. Take you worst lens and shoot a subject with your older D70 or 80 and then a shot with it on the D800. Viewed at the same image size, no matter how much you zoom in, the D800 is going to have finer detail, better color and a whole lot more dynamic range.
But viewed at normal distances on a screen, those advantages so easily seen when at 100%, lose significance at normal human scales such that the 6-10mpx camera that is much worse on paper keeps up with the high end cameras very well.
Hand holding is possible at the same speed that was acceptable to you on lower res cameras, provided you look at the images at the same distance and image size. The option to zoom in so far in ridiculous degrees of magnification with the D800 files, allows pixel peepers to spot motion blur down to 6 microns in radius! All completely invisible in any print or screen or at any magnification that allows the whole image to be seen at once. So the rumors are correct, in a way, but not with real images, at actual viewing scales.

I learned to increase shutter speed the first hour I got my D7000 when it came out so never had a rude awakening when getting the D800. Sure, my hand held portraits get a higher shutter speed than I used to with film but I never used a loupe that had 6 micron resolution either. If I am not going to pixel peep, I am happy with 1/60th with a 85 1.4 but if I am printing large or using a high degree of magnification, I move it up to 1/250.


Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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FineArtSnaps

Leesburg, US
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#13. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 12

FineArtSnaps Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Jun 2012
Sat 09-Nov-13 12:26 AM

Stan's right. It always amazes me when I realize how many people buy the D800, and especially the D800e, so they can test it instead of shoot photographs with it. It's just a camera, guys. An amazing one, true, but still, just a camera. What matters is photographs, not any camera's specs.

Russ Lewis
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ericbowles

Atlanta, US
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#14. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Sun 10-Nov-13 12:30 PM

My experience is similar to the consensus here. Faster shutter speeds are better to account for subject motion and photographer motion. I try to use a rule of thumb of 1 / 2x focal length but that does not always work. I've gotten very sharp images at much slower shutter speeds. With VR lenses I've gotten some really nice blurs at 1/50 sec and lower on 200-400mm focal lengths.

I'm quite reluctant to push ISO too high. I find the lower light situations where I need higher ISO levels are low contrast situations. Higher ISO carries lower contrast and dynamic range, so I need to be very careful about the tradeoffs. Yes - a sharp image is better than a soft image, but a low contrast image that lacks pop is not any good either.

I find that DOF selection is very important with FX compared to DX. And even more when you have the high resolution of the D800 because it provides the resolution to see slightly out of focus areas. For example, DOF tables do not seem to be quite as accurate on the high resolution of the D800. I find the margins can be unacceptably soft and I need more DOF. Of course, this complicates the ISO and shutter speed issues.

Last weekend I was using a circular polarizer to make the fall color pop with my 70-200. That was a mistake - I had far too many soft images due to inadequate shutter speed - especially images with subject motion or tracking images with an unattractive background blur. You need to commit to the shutter speed required - either fast enough to stop action or slow enough to make blur look intentional. In between with a little blur was the worst outcome.

Eric Bowles
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Clint S

Chula Vista, US
460 posts

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#15. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

Clint S Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jan 2011
Sat 30-Nov-13 06:10 AM | edited Sat 30-Nov-13 06:17 AM by Clint S

The stability of the camera when the shutter is pressed has always been an issue since photography began. The D800 is no different. If your holding technique is sloppy it will show up in the photo. So if your images show some camera movement when the photo was snapped, just work on improving your technique. No tripods required unless you would typically use one.

As for the lenses - the D800 will make your older lenses amazing to what you are used to seeing from them. The latest and greatest lenses are not required. I have a couple of photos with some crops to demonstrate. You can see larger images inthe gallery at
https://images.nikonians.org/galleries/showgallery.php/cat/22762

Both of the images were taken from moving objects, one from a carnival ride and the other from a racing yacht at sea - definitely not solid platforms.

The exposure settings for either were not ideal. But when you look at the crops from the photos, it is really amazing.

Click on image to view larger version


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The photo of the ship taken using a 2006 80-400mm AF-D lens at 230mm and 1/250th of second from a rocking and moving yacht. BTW - this lens that did not even show up on DXO Marks suggested telephoto lenses for the D800 as its reported IQ was below the 15 they did recommend.

Now look at the crop of the sails and mast - despite the situation the chain that is used to hold and move the 2nd from the main deck sail on the middle mast is quite easy to identify. Each one of those chain links is something like 8 x 11 pixels and yet are clear enough to show up in the photo despite not using optimum gear or camera settings.

The Kettle Corn sign (Maybe 3 feet x 5 feet and about center of the photo on the main drag) in the crop of the carnival ride was something like 1/8 of a mile from where the ride I was on.

Not bad for hand holding in moving environments. Shoot what you got!

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ajdooley

Waterloo, US
3377 posts

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#16. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 15

ajdooley Gold Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006
Sat 30-Nov-13 10:42 AM

Clint -- Excellent examples! You also are illustrating what I say constantly in response to questions like this and others about resolution, sharpness, etc. The D800/E family of bodies are the cutting edge of capability at this time. As you said, they will add those capabilities to ANY lens you put on your D800/E. People need to stop obsessing over test reports, stop shooting brick walls and test targets and... SHOT PHOTOGRAPHS!!!

I know... I'm screaming there. Shoot more. Develop better technique. Enjoy these incredibly capable cameras. The D800/E family of cameras has exceeded the capability of any film we ever had, so get out there and record the wonderful world you are blessed to live in with the cameras you are so fortunate to have.

Alan
Waterloo, IL, USA
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FineArtSnaps

Leesburg, US
401 posts

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#17. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 16

FineArtSnaps Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Jun 2012
Sat 30-Nov-13 01:05 PM

"I am constantly amused by the notion that some people have about photographic technique – a notion which reveals itself in an insatiable craving for sharpness of images. Is this the passion of an obsession? Or do these people hope, by this trompe l’oeil technique, to get to closer grips with reality? In either case, they are just as far away from the real problem as those of that other generation which used to endow all its photographic anecdotes with an intentional unsharpness such as was deemed to be 'artistic.'"

Henri Cartier-Bresson: from The Decisive Moment

Russ Lewis
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www.FineArtSnaps.com

mklass

Tacoma, US
7437 posts

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#18. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 17

mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006
Sat 30-Nov-13 01:46 PM

>"I am constantly amused by the notion that some people
>have about photographic technique – a notion which reveals
>itself in an insatiable craving for sharpness of images. Is
>this the passion of an obsession? Or do these people hope, by
>this trompe l’oeil technique, to get to closer grips with
>reality? In either case, they are just as far away from the
>real problem as those of that other generation which used to
>endow all its photographic anecdotes with an intentional
>unsharpness such as was deemed to be 'artistic.'"
>
>Henri Cartier-Bresson: from The Decisive Moment

That does it, I'm not sharpening any of my shots anymore. Anyone know where I can get a camera and software with no sharpening options?

But seriously, sharpness can be overemphasized. But outright blur is not necessarily good unless for a artistic reason, and only in limited circumstances. It won't do for a portrait, for example, while a little softness might be OK.


Mick
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or
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FineArtSnaps

Leesburg, US
401 posts

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#19. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 18

FineArtSnaps Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Jun 2012
Sat 30-Nov-13 03:53 PM

Right, Mick. HCB was talking about photography as art. If you're shooting portraits, weddings, etc., in other words, commercial stuff, it has to be technically excellent -- which nowadays isn't at all hard to bring off. But in art, emotional impact is everything. Nice if it's sharp too, of course.

Russ Lewis
www.russ-lewis.com
www.FineArtSnaps.com

Ineluki

Nuremberg, DE
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#20. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 18

Ineluki Gold Member Nikonian since 03rd Aug 2011
Sat 30-Nov-13 04:23 PM

Hi Mick,

it`s good to have sharp lenses but there is no need to make a picture sharper as it is.
Egbert

Egbert

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https://images.nikonians.org/galleries/showgallery.php/ppuser/401509/cat/500/

avisys

Placitas, US
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#21. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

avisys Basic Member
Sat 30-Nov-13 10:08 PM | edited Sat 30-Nov-13 10:22 PM by avisys

Oh, when you boil it all down (and I mean BOIL), the question is: Are you planning to use all those 36 megapixels?

If you (really) are, then I'd recommend 3x shutter speed. And, if not hand-held, a very well equipped Gitzo with your arm/wrist (carefully) draped across the lens if possible --- and if not possible, that means the lens is short enough that it doesn't matter.

If you are not really planning to use all those 36 megapixels, then things are absolutely no different than they were with your 12 megapixel D2x.

Which begs the question . . .

(Oh, at f8, all lenses are pretty much alike.)

(Oh, yes again, as a competitive pistol shooter, I can tell you that your index finger can ruin everything. Work on that. Every shutter release should be a surprise.)

AviSys

mklass

Tacoma, US
7437 posts

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#22. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 20

mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006
Sat 30-Nov-13 10:28 PM

>Hi Mick,
>
>it`s good to have sharp lenses but there is no need to make a
>picture sharper as it is.
>Egbert

That's true, sharpening with the D800 and D7100 is usually lees intensive, if needed at all.

Mick
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Martin Turner

Bidford on Avon, UK
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#23. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

Martin Turner Moderator Expert professional PJ & PR photographer Nikonian since 19th Jun 2006
Sat 30-Nov-13 11:16 PM

I only really make sense of the D800's full resolution when shooting with studio strobes, which completely freeze the action, at 1/2500 of a second, or when mounted on a stable tripod, in which case, for a stationery object, you can shoot at 30 seconds.

Everything else is a trade-off.

_However_

The requirements for sharpness should be based on the reproduction requirement, not on satisfying the technical capabilities of the camera. I got the D800 to shoot advertising. If I'm shooting pictures of kids in a pie-eating contest, it's unlikely I'll want to reproduce these on a 96 sheet billboard. Most of my pictures never appear larger than A3 size in a layout. For that, the requirements are the same as with any other camera capable of reproduction at that size.


M A R T I N • T U R N E R
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mklass

Tacoma, US
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#24. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 23

mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006
Sat 30-Nov-13 11:23 PM

That's true, Martin. If you resize a D800 image to 12-16MB, the sharpness issues disappear like magic.

Mick
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jjmirenzi

Dupont, US
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#25. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 24

jjmirenzi Registered since 31st May 2012
Thu 19-Dec-13 07:13 PM

I am a wedding/portrait photographer, I use the D700/D300 for weddings and the D800 for landscapes and portrait and always on a tripod.

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ericbowles

Atlanta, US
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#26. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 0

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Thu 19-Dec-13 07:35 PM

Given that this post has been active for nearly 6 weeks, I've had a chance to look a little closer and my range of shutter speeds.

Invariably, with long lenses I find I am shooting wide open at high ISO's. While I typically use a tripod, that's not always the case. Shutter speed is a matter of compromises.

I was photographing gorillas at the Atlanta Zoo on an overcast day. That was great as it eliminated the harsh shadows. The gorillas move relatively slowly, but I was using a 600mm lens. Most images were between 1/200 sec and 1/400 sec. They look great as large prints even after cropping.

I was in Cades Cove last week. I had a 600mm lens in the trunk and a 200-400 on the seat next to me at dusk. While in the car, I spotted a wonderful owl on a fencepost. I stopped the car so I could photgraph the owl with out spooking it - the car served as a blind. My images were handheld shooting out the passenger window - the door used for support. I had VR ON and ISO 1600. My shutter speed was 1/100 sec and I had about 10 sharp frames - 50% of the shutter releases.

I would not go looking for these situations. But if your subject is still, a little support goes a long way and permits handheld images well below conventional wisdom.


Eric Bowles
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nikonus

Southern California, US
503 posts

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#27. "RE: D800 Handholding Shutter Speeds" | In response to Reply # 26

nikonus Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 04th Feb 2007
Sun 22-Dec-13 02:31 AM | edited Sun 22-Dec-13 11:01 AM by nikonus

I have used older cheaper lenses and high end current nikon glass on the D800 .
For me they are all good when you find the weak areas and avoid them . Used an old Tamron from the 80s 28 - 70 mm manual lens you see them on ebay for $40 , really sharp at 100% on LR 4 or PS . Even at below the mm VS shutter standard (250 mm at 1/250 ). That still works , some of the longer lenses need 3 images to get a good focus lock near wide open .

With all the post processing and noise reduction , rarely do I about worry about ISO issue . Running RAW just chokes most software when post processing . While you can crop a nice image out of the 36MP sensor . Now storage issues appear as we get too lazy to delete 40 bird , flower , sunsets files.

People who have Rifle / pistol /archery target shooting skills seem to work through the hold steady issues .
They have much in common , breath holding and a steady brace , Lean or stance .

Hans K.

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