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OliverR

Green Bay, US
27 posts

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OliverR Registered since 16th Oct 2011
Wed 08-May-13 06:08 PM | edited Wed 08-May-13 06:14 PM by Asgard

Hello fellow Nikonians;
I'm planning to upgrade my camera. I do have a D-40X and I'm thinking about the D-800 or D-800E.
Could someone give an expert advice regarding the pros and cons between this two models?
Any comment will be greatly appreciated.
O.R.
Green Bay, WI.

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GiantTristan

Stamford, US
2688 posts

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#1. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

GiantTristan Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jan 2006
Wed 08-May-13 06:15 PM

There are no entries in your profile and it is not clear what kind of lenses you currently own. The pictures in your gallery were taken with a 18-200 DX lens. While this is a good lens for a DX camera like the D40X, you might want to consider acquiring one or several FX lenses which are a lot more suitable for a high resolution FX camera like the D800/e. Nikon has published a list with recommended lenses for the D800/e.

Tristan

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Rob_ZN

Durban, ZA
108 posts

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#2. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

Rob_ZN Registered since 23rd Dec 2012
Wed 08-May-13 06:22 PM

Hi.

I'm no expert and don't really have advice, but I will point you to have a look at http://photographylife.com/nikon-d800-vs-d800e for a short article on the differences between the two.

Hope that helps.

Rob

JPJ

Toronto, CA
1327 posts

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#3. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

JPJ Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Aug 2009
Wed 08-May-13 07:23 PM

The posted link explains well the difference between the 2 cameras. I recently had to decide between them and choose the 'e'. My reasoning was the price difference locally wasn't that great and the retailer was throwing in some freebees that made the price even closer.

The 'e' will resolve ever slightly more detail, but more important to me is the cancelling out of the low pass filter means you start with an image that does not need capture sharpening. This can really be beneficial shooting at higher ISO where additional sharpening can aggravate noise.

Jason

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avisys

Placitas, US
482 posts

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#4. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 3

avisys Basic Member
Wed 08-May-13 08:48 PM

I chose the D800 because I shoot a lot of small birds. Feathers, because of their fine repeating patterns, tend to be subject to moire'.

That said, late reviews of the cameras tend to discount the moire' problem at such a high resolution --- maybe the D800e would have been a better choice???

OTOH, the resolution is so high anyway, maybe it doesn't really make a difference.

But, yes, you need some lenses. A D800/e with DX lenses is like a Lamborghini with wooden tires.

AviSys

lukaswerth

Lahore, PK
576 posts

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#5. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

lukaswerth Registered since 24th May 2012
Thu 09-May-13 12:03 AM

The answer depends on your preferences and your finances, I would say. If you care a lot for getting the tiniest detail in your images, the d800e might give you, if nothing else, just a better feeling in your guts. But then, when I bought my camera, the difference between e and non-e was - in Germany - about 300€. Now it is 700 or so, and if I would have to buy a camera today, I might reconsider. But this is also a question of how deep your pockets are.

Lukas

Trying to be a keeper of the light

ericbowles

Atlanta, US
10631 posts

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#6. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Thu 09-May-13 08:48 AM

The D800E provides the ultimate level of resolution on an FX body. The D800 provides excellent resolution - with a difference that is hard to observe, but a benefit when it comes to video.

The D600 should be part of your mix. It also is a full frame body, and provides similar resolution to the D800 in a smaller form factor and lower price.

Without high quality FX lenses, you'd be hard pressed to get a benefit from the D800E. The D800/E have some benefits in terms of AF, controls, etc, but the D600 is still a good camera.


Eric Bowles
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briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

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#7. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Thu 09-May-13 09:40 AM

Hi, Oliver.

It's relatively simple to describe the differences between the D800 and D800E - the link above is a good read on that subject

It's difficult to give any more general advice about which camera to choose without knowing something about what you expect to gain, and what sort of things you like to shoot.

As Eric says, going for the D800/E is going to ask more from your lenses and from your own skills, so you may not (at least at first) see as much improvement as you would like. Unless you have a specific requirement which only the D800/E can satisfy, I would advise you to also consider the D600 and D7100.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

jsphotonc

Durham, US
15 posts

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#8. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

jsphotonc Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Nov 2009
Thu 09-May-13 10:33 AM

Oliver: One thing that I think has not been mentioned yet is the learning curve. The D40X is a relative simple DSLR, while the D800/E is a very complex camera. It took me a long time (several years) to become reasonably comfortable with Nikon's higher end systems. If you upgrade you should be prepared to invest a good bit of time - and shooting - to become proficient with the D800/E.

Don't get me wrong. For me that investment was well worth it. But that may not be true for everyone. And I acknowledge that perhaps my learning curve was longer than ... well, longer. My previous experience was with an ancient film SLR, and there were only four basic decisions to make with those simple beasts to get a properly exposed image.

-JS

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jhearl

Milford, VA, US
465 posts

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#9. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 8

jhearl Registered since 16th Apr 2007
Thu 09-May-13 11:05 AM

I too have to mention the learning curve. I went from a D40X to a D300 some years ago and it was a major leap even though I had lots of experience with digital and film cameras. Not one that I regret for an instant, but it took a long time (maybe a year or more) before I was really comfortable with the D300. When I went to the D800E, it was a very simple transition because it was functionally so similar to the D300 although I'm still learning how to get the best out of it and I've had it for nearly a year now.

There's also a major cost factor in going from DX to FX. I decided to buy a 24-70 lens for my D800E and we're talking about $5K for the camera and just one general-purpose lens. Again, a very big leap from a D40X.

I might suggest you take a look at the D7100 instead. You could use your existing DX lenses and it is considerably less expensive than the D800. Had it been available when I bought my D800E, I might well have gone that way myself. Of course, your needs will vary and you may be independently wealthy, in which case the D800E with about $6K to $10K worth of lenses, a new tripod, and a few other odds and ends may be exactly what you want. But be prepared for a big investment in time to get the best out of it.

Cheers -
John

My Flickr page: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dancingtuna

LMMiller9

Potomac, US
1169 posts

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#10. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

LMMiller9 Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2005
Thu 09-May-13 07:17 PM

The difference in image quality is very slight and you won't be able to see it unless you are a very advanced photographer with the absolute best lenses. If you are moving up from a D-40x I suspect you are going to need to spend a lot of money on lenses, much more than on the camera. You would be better off getting the D800 and using the difference to invest in high quality lenses.

Larry Miller, Potomac, MD
DF/D810
http://lmmillerphotography.smugmug.com/

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geoffc

San Pedro, US
132 posts

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#11. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 10

geoffc Registered since 21st Apr 2008
Thu 09-May-13 07:43 PM

Unless you have the quality lenses to match either 800 model, I'd just buy a D700 used for very cheap and get into full frame that way. Or the D600 if you insist on new.

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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3571 posts

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#12. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Thu 09-May-13 09:40 PM

Too many unknowns to give advice, as Brian said. Why FX and why just these two models?
What do you shoot and in what conditions? How do you display the images, screen, large format printer, home ink jet A4 printer, web publication etc?
The D800 is a great camera but few people really need it or can use it for best advantage. Any of the modern DSLRs Nikon produces, even the the D3200 are capable of low noise, high resolution, accurate color, and metering and hard to tell the results between them except in extreme cases.
Unless you have a compelling reason to invest the amount needed to optimize the lenses in your bag, a D7100 would be pretty hard to leave off your list. It is the best bang for the buck now in Nikon.

What specific problems with your current camera and lenses that some features of newer cameras would resolve? Is budget a prime consideration when selecting a new camera?
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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jamesvoortman

Durban, ZA
1478 posts

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#13. "RE: ADVICE" | In response to Reply # 0

jamesvoortman Silver Member Nikonian since 06th Sep 2004
Fri 10-May-13 05:53 PM

Compared to the jump from D40x the differences between the D800 and D800E is minimal. D800e offers a little extra resolution that will only be visible when it is used with the recommended lenses under optimal conditions.

Although you can use DX lenses with D800/E the viewfinder image will be smaller and more difficult to work with than if you upgraded to another DX camera (BTDT). If you do not plan to invest in FX lenses then seriously consider one of the new generation DX cameras (D3200, D5200 and D7100). They are now several generations ahead of the D40X. The biggest differences you will notice are increased resolution, much better high ISO capability and improved AF systems. They all have a lot of new features that were not present on the D40x.

As others have said this switch only makes sense if you are prepared to invest in the recommended FX lenses for D800/E, otherwise D600 or the newer DX models will serve you better. In addition to lenses, the D800 files are huge and modern software/hardware is also recommended. IIRC the D40x uses CF cards. D800/E has one CF card slot but it performs best with large capacity high speed CF and SD cards that were not available when the D40x was on the market. so include the cost of new cards if yours are not suitable. D800 RAW files vary from 45 Mb to 70Mb depending on settings. Jpeg files are large too. Any card smaller than 4 Gb fills up very fast.

There is quite a significant difference in the menu system and controls between the D40x and the D800/E which will take some time to get used to. If you rely on the scene modes, these are completely absent on all the Dx00 models and you will have to take much more manual control of your settings. However, if you are already normally using the P,A,S,M modes on D40x instead of the built-in scene modes then the learning curve will be a lot less daunting and the upgrade will make a lot of advanced features available to you.

Be aware that the D800/E is a much larger heavier camera than D40x (approximately double) and so too are the appropriate lenses.

finally, accessories like infra red and cable remote releases that you may have for the D40X will not work on D800/E and you should factor in for new ones if you use these.

Good luck with the decision.

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