Even though we ARE Nikon lovers,we are NOT affiliated with Nikon Corp. in any way.

English German French

Sign up Login
Home Forums Articles Galleries Recent Photos Contest Help Search News Workshops Shop Upgrade Membership Recommended
members
All members Wiki Contests Vouchers Apps Newsletter THE NIKONIAN™ Magazines Podcasts Fundraising

What should I consider in a D800 with lens?

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author
leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Thu 10-Jan-13 09:27 PM | edited Thu 10-Jan-13 09:57 PM by leonardevens

I have a Nikon D90 with Nikon 18-200 and a Sigma 10-20 mm lenses.

This is more than adequate for my routine needs.

But I also do 4 x 5 photography with a view camera using film and scanning it on an Epson V700 scanner. I am now 79 years old, so it gets increasingly difficult to use my view camera, which I really enjoy, because of all the gear I have to carry around. So I am considering alternatives. I am willing to spend a lot because, at my age, my savings don't need to last as long, so I can afford to splurge.

I posted a question in a large format forum about getting a 6 x 9 view camera with a digital back, and several people suggested that I could do as well or better as I do now with a Nikon full frame camera such as the D600 or D800, at least as far as image quality is concerned.

So my questions about the D800 are as follows. Which lens or lenses should I consider getting? Also, I really enjoy what I can get with movements in a view camera. Because there is so much more depth of field in a smaller format, movements are not as necessary, but assuming I want a tilt shift lens, which lens should I consider?

I don't need to make wall sized prints, but I would like to make 16 x 20 prints which from several feet away seem to have view camera quality. But, keep in mind that I may need to do considerable cropping to mimic the rise/fall and swing capabilities of a view camera.

Finally, should I consider the D800E? Or will it require too much fiddling to avoid moire? And will I be satisfied enough with the resolution of the D800?

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3559 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#1. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 0

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Thu 10-Jan-13 09:37 PM

Hello Leonard, The image quality of the D800 might pleasantly surprise you with its DR and color depth and fine resolution. But you will be restricted to a few Perspective Control lenses that Nikon(3 fl's) makes or a limited number of 3rd party brands such as Samyang which makes a 24mm tilt and shift for a reasonable price..
The most common landscape PC lens by Nikon is the 24mm f/3.5 that is a bit over $2000.
If you want more control but a larger less portable rig there is the various rail systems with billows by companies like Horseman.
You likely know more about those offerings than just about anyone on this forum since you have been using these capabilities with your view camera.
I think you would find no problem associated with the D800e not having an AA filter, it is rarely seen to be a problem but the additional sharpness would likely be appreciated coming from a view camera.
The D800e would be the only SLR that would give the larger format cameras a run for it, yet has the added advantage of good low light, high ISO performance.
If you are really curious and not able to try out the D800 with local photographers, you could rent one, and a 24 PC-E lenses for a weekend to see it is really fits your needs.
Good luck with your choice.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

M_Jackson

Jackson, US
747 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#2. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 1

M_Jackson Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005
Thu 10-Jan-13 11:00 PM | edited Fri 11-Jan-13 02:43 AM by M_Jackson

Leonard,
I believe both of your lenses are DX lenses. I have a Sigma 10-20 and it is definitely a DX lens. B&H lists the 18-200 as a DX lens, too.

If you put either of them on a D800, you will only be shooting at DX image size. You'd likely need to invest in FX lenses to get the full power of the D800.

14-24 and 24-70 are great FX lenses.

Best of luck,
M. Jackson

M. Jackson
Jackson Hole, WY

Blog: www.bestofthetetons.com
Web Site: www.tetonimages.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

GiantTristan

Stamford, US
2670 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#3. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 0

GiantTristan Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jan 2006
Fri 11-Jan-13 12:21 AM

If you want to consider lenses that cover the focal length range of you Sigma 10-20, you might want to have a look at the Nikon 14-24/2.8 or consider one of the excellent Zeiss zf prime lenses lenses, 15/2.8, 21/2.8 or 25/2. These lenses are all of very high optical quality which I believe you will need to fully realize the potential of the D800.

Tristan

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

RSchussel

Vallejo, US
424 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#4. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 3

RSchussel Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Nov 2008
Fri 11-Jan-13 02:01 AM

Leonard
If ultimate sharpness is not an issue consider a D600 and use the $1000 towards some FX lens. Some of the newer F4 zooms nikon is coming out with may meet your needs,

Bob

HBB

Phoenix, US
8773 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#5. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 0

HBB Moderator Hal is an expert in several areas, including CLS Awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Resources. Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Charter Member
Fri 11-Jan-13 07:34 PM

Leonard:

Thanks for stopping in. I hope your time with Nikonians is rewarding.

If you haven't already done so, go here, for an ongoing discussion about the D800E resolution and moire issues.

Regards,

HBB in Phoenix, Arizona
Nikonian Team Member

Photography is a journey with no conceivable destination.

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#6. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 0

leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Fri 11-Jan-13 11:04 PM

Thanks for all the useful information.

If I can screw up the courage to spend so much, I think I will get the Nikon d800 and the Nikon 24-70 mm lens. That should get me started. I will also consider getting the 14-24 mm lens or a similar wide angle zoom. I was told that the 14-24 mm lens would not accomodate filters, but I don't usually use filters. I would also like a long lens, and a tilt shift lens, but of course, that will get deeper into my savings. I have to be a bit careful because I could easily live another 15 years and mt wife could easily live 20 or more.

So which long lenses should I consider, and, will the 24 mm tilt shift lens work with the d800?

Finally, anything else I should keep in mind?

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

RSchussel

Vallejo, US
424 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#7. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 6

RSchussel Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Nov 2008
Fri 11-Jan-13 11:21 PM

Leonard
The 24-70 is a great place to start.
If you are doing landscapes the 14-24 F2.8 may be a better choice than the 70-200 F2.8. You might consider renting them to see if they meet your shooting style. If you dont need a very fast len their may be some prime lens that would suit your needs.

Until a few days afo I was using a D7000. Even on a D7000 the 14-24 is very wide (equivalent to a 21-35mm).

Bob

km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3559 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#8. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 6

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Sat 12-Jan-13 05:07 AM

Yes, the 24 PC-E works but due to the overhang of the large pentaprism doghouse, the lens needs to be tilted to attach and then adjusted to how you wish to use is normally..
I answered your initial question focusing on the T/S lenses and only knew about your landscape interests. For a general purpose mid zoom, the 24-70 2.8 is the standard by which others are judged. It is one of the most commonly owned Fx lenses for good reason, optically it is very good, is built well and has a very useful range. If your longer lens interests are limited to 200 and less, the standard that every pro owns and uses a lot is the excellent 70-200 VRII f/2.8. It is my most often used lens, primarily for portraiture or candids, events etc.
For general purpose wide angle lenses the 14-24 is unique in zooms, a zoom that beats all other zooms in optical performance and all primes except possibly the 21mm Zeiss, which is either tied or slightly better.
It is the lens introduced when the D3 was introduced that was responsible for selling an awful lot of D3s, just to get full use out of that lens. One characteristic that some photographers do not like is the bulbous front element makes use of standard screw on filters impossible. The filter issue can be solved with filter holder frames for such as the Lee Filters SW-150 Filter Holder or one of the screw on adapters for 145mm filters such as the Fotodiox. The Lee filters are more useful in that a GND filter can be slid up and down to fit the need of the scene rather than needing to put the horizon at the center of the frame as with normal circular screw on filters. If you ever wanted filters, that would be the most useful style on any serious landscape rig. The only draw backs to the Lee system is the CPL are not possible.

If your shooting favors faster primes, there are a number of standouts, such as the 85 f/1.4G, the 24 f/1.4 105 DC or 135 DC and 200 f/2.0. But these add up to more than a couple of quality zooms.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

venusian

US
186 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#9. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 8

venusian Registered since 17th Dec 2008
Sun 13-Jan-13 05:41 PM

Hi Leonard,

If resolution concerns you, then I would opt for the D800E (as I have) to squeeze as much resolution of the sensor as possible. In the real world, there is not much difference between the two models.

I've seen virtually no issues with moiré using the 800E. It does not have an anti aliasing filter and I suspect your field camera does not as well.

Regarding prime lenses, I have the 85mm 1.8G which is considerable cheaper and likely lighter than the 1.4 G and it is outstanding re resolution on the 800E. I also have the Zeiss 50mm zf.2 makro-planar and the 70-200mm Nikon VR II (the latter is heavy). Both are excellent on the 800E.

Ming Thein says he has experienced different levels of quality for the D800 to D800E when using different lenses. You can read more here... http://blog.mingthein.com/2012/06/30/recommended-lenses-for-the-nikon-d800e/ There are other related articles in his website.

Lastly, should you purchase the 800 or 800E, make sure you buy it from a dealer that will take it back within 30 days without penalty (e.g. B&H). There have been some left focus issues with versions of these cameras were made during early production runs, but current versions seem OK. Check this forum for more information. Should you get an 800 or 800E, make sure to test for any left focus issues early on before the 30-day grace period expires. Sending defective versions of these cameras in for repair have not been very successful.

Good luck with your choices!

Nick (Roxbury, Connecticut Nikonian)

ericbowles

Atlanta, US
10530 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#10. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 0

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Sun 13-Jan-13 08:19 PM

I've had the D800E for about 8 months. Images quality is very good with a wide range of subjects and shooting conditions. Moire is very rare with natural subjects and even for events I have not seen moire.

The classic set of lenses would be:
Nikon 14-24
Nikon 24-70
Nikon 70-200 VR II (not the earlier VR version)

There are alternative lenses depending on your needs, but these are top of the line in terms of professional quality zoom lenses.

You should have plenty of image quality for 16x20 prints and the low noise and high resolution means images hold up well with cropping to large prints.

Given that you are comparing the camera to images from a View camera, I would maximize image quality with the D800E rather than the D800 or D600 (which are probably perfectly fine).


Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Workshops

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#11. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 9

leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Sun 13-Jan-13 10:49 PM

>Hi Leonard,
>
>If resolution concerns you, then I would opt for the D800E (as
>I have) to squeeze as much resolution of the sensor as
>possible. In the real world, there is not much difference
>between the two models.
>
>I've seen virtually no issues with moiré using the 800E. It
>does not have an anti aliasing filter and I suspect your field
>camera does not as well.
>
>Regarding prime lenses, I have the 85mm 1.8G which is
>considerable cheaper and likely lighter than the 1.4 G and it
>is outstanding re resolution on the 800E. I also have the
>Zeiss 50mm zf.2 makro-planar and the 70-200mm Nikon VR II (the
>latter is heavy). Both are excellent on the 800E.
>
>Ming Thein says he has experienced different levels of quality
>for the D800 to D800E when using different lenses. You can
>read more here...
>http://blog.mingthein.com/2012/06/30/recommended-lenses-for-the-nikon-d800e/
>There are other related articles in his website.
>
>Lastly, should you purchase the 800 or 800E, make sure you buy
>it from a dealer that will take it back within 30 days without
>penalty (e.g. B&H). There have been some left focus issues
>with versions of these cameras were made during early
>production runs, but current versions seem OK. Check this
>forum for more information. Should you get an 800 or 800E,
>make sure to test for any left focus issues early on before
>the 30-day grace period expires. Sending defective versions of
>these cameras in for repair have not been very successful.
>
>Good luck with your choices!
>

If there is not much difference between the two models, I think I will opt for the d800 in order to save some money. I doubt if I am up to takeing advantage of minor differences in resolution between the 800 and 800e

Also, in architectural photography, I suspect moire may on occasion be a problem.

My view camera is not a digital camera so the optics is entirely different. It is true that I may see moire on rare occasions when I scan my negatives, so if the 800 avoids it slightly better that will be an advantage over what I now have.

But perhaps I don't really understand the issues?

Although I have purchased equipment from B&H and been satisfied, I plan to buy the equipment from Calumet Photo in Chicago. I have had good luck with them in the past about returning equipment which was defective. Also, they are very helpful when I have questions about how to use equipment.

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#13. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 9

leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Sun 13-Jan-13 11:04 PM

>Hi Leonard,
>
>If resolution concerns you, then I would opt for the D800E (as
>I have) to squeeze as much resolution of the sensor as
>possible. In the real world, there is not much difference
>between the two models.
>
>I've seen virtually no issues with moiré using the 800E. It
>does not have an anti aliasing filter and I suspect your field
>camera does not as well.
>
>Regarding prime lenses, I have the 85mm 1.8G which is
>considerable cheaper and likely lighter than the 1.4 G and it
>is outstanding re resolution on the 800E. I also have the
>Zeiss 50mm zf.2 makro-planar and the 70-200mm Nikon VR II (the
>latter is heavy). Both are excellent on the 800E.
>
>Ming Thein says he has experienced different levels of quality
>for the D800 to D800E when using different lenses. You can
>read more here...
>http://blog.mingthein.com/2012/06/30/recommended-lenses-for-the-nikon-d800e/
>There are other related articles in his website.
>
>Lastly, should you purchase the 800 or 800E, make sure you buy
>it from a dealer that will take it back within 30 days without
>penalty (e.g. B&H). There have been some left focus issues
>with versions of these cameras were made during early
>production runs, but current versions seem OK. Check this
>forum for more information. Should you get an 800 or 800E,
>make sure to test for any left focus issues early on before
>the 30-day grace period expires. Sending defective versions of
>these cameras in for repair have not been very successful.
>
>Good luck with your choices!
>

If there is not much difference between the two models, I think I will opt for the d800 in order to save some money. I doubt if I am up to takeing advantage of minor differences in resolution between the 800 and 800e

Also, in architectural photography, I suspect moire may on occasion be a problem.

My view camera is not a digital camera so the optics is entirely different. It is true that I may see moire on rare occasions when I scan my negatives, so if the 800 avoids it slightly better that will be an advantage over what I now have.

But perhaps I don't really understand the issues?

Although I have purchased equipment from B&H and been satisfied, I plan to buy the equipment from Calumet Photo in Chicago. I have had good luck with them in the past about returning equipment which was defective. Also, they are very helpful when I have questions about how to use equipment.

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#14. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 9

leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Mon 14-Jan-13 09:32 AM

>Hi Leonard,
>
>If resolution concerns you, then I would opt for the D800E (as
>I have) to squeeze as much resolution of the sensor as
>possible. In the real world, there is not much difference
>between the two models.
>
>I've seen virtually no issues with moiré using the 800E. It
>does not have an anti aliasing filter and I suspect your field
>camera does not as well.
>
>Regarding prime lenses, I have the 85mm 1.8G which is
>considerable cheaper and likely lighter than the 1.4 G and it
>is outstanding re resolution on the 800E. I also have the
>Zeiss 50mm zf.2 makro-planar and the 70-200mm Nikon VR II (the
>latter is heavy). Both are excellent on the 800E.
>
>Ming Thein says he has experienced different levels of quality
>for the D800 to D800E when using different lenses. You can
>read more here...
>http://blog.mingthein.com/2012/06/30/recommended-lenses-for-the-nikon-d800e/
>There are other related articles in his website.
>
>Lastly, should you purchase the 800 or 800E, make sure you buy
>it from a dealer that will take it back within 30 days without
>penalty (e.g. B&H). There have been some left focus issues
>with versions of these cameras were made during early
>production runs, but current versions seem OK. Check this
>forum for more information. Should you get an 800 or 800E,
>make sure to test for any left focus issues early on before
>the 30-day grace period expires. Sending defective versions of
>these cameras in for repair have not been very successful.
>
>Good luck with your choices!
>

If there is not much difference between the two models, I think I will opt for the d800 in order to save some money. I doubt if I am up to takeing advantage of minor differences in resolution between the 800 and 800e

Also, in architectural photography, I suspect moire may on occasion be a problem.

My view camera is not a digital camera so the optics is entirely different. It is true that I may see moire on rare occasions when I scan my negatives, so if the 800 avoids it slightly better that will be an advantage over what I now have.

But perhaps I don't really understand the issues?

Although I have purchased equipment from B&H and been satisfied, I plan to buy the equipment from Calumet Photo in Chicago. I have had good luck with them in the past about returning equipment which was defective. Also, they are very helpful when I have questions about how to use equipment.

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

Henry64

DK
142 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#15. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 10

Henry64 Silver Member Nikonian since 13th Jan 2008
Mon 14-Jan-13 01:25 PM | edited Mon 14-Jan-13 01:28 PM by Henry64

Well as an alternative to the king trinity you should also have a look the F4's (as also suggested in this thread).

16-35/F4 VR 77mm thread
24-120/F4 VR 77mm thread
70-200/F2.8 VRII 77mm thread - due the the overlap this might not be very interesting, but if you need 140-400mm you could add a TC2xIII, at "little" cost and little weight.

They are very sharp, they will give you the same or shallower DOF as you are used to if you have a F2.8 DX.

In your age I would assume less (weight) is more So there you go, don't we just make it easy on you. Decisions, Decisions, Decisions

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#16. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 15

leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Mon 14-Jan-13 06:05 PM

>Well as an alternative to the king trinity you should also
>have a look the F4's (as also suggested in this thread).
>
>16-35/F4 VR 77mm thread
>24-120/F4 VR 77mm thread
>70-200/F2.8 VRII 77mm thread - due the the overlap this might
>not be very interesting, but if you need 140-400mm you could
>add a TC2xIII, at "little" cost and little weight.
>
>They are very sharp, they will give you the same or shallower
>DOF as you are used to if you have a F2.8 DX.
>
>In your age I would assume less (weight) is more So there
>you go, don't we just make it easy on you. Decisions,
>Decisions, Decisions


I see that there are choices for lenses that cost half as much as the best lenses. Can anyone tell me how much difference I am likely to see on a d800? Will I be able to see a difference in a 16 x 20 print? Also, will I be able to see a difference if I crop moderately.

I should explain what I mean by "crop". I routinely reduce the 35 mm format to 4:5 aspect ratio, so I lop off the ends. Also, in order to mimic the effect of view camera rise, I may cut off the bottom quarter in landscape orientation. Under those circumstances should I see a difference?

My inclination at present is to get the best 24-70 and 14-24 Nikon lenses and then consider a less expensive Nikon for a long zoom.

Finally, how good are third party choices, and which should I consider?

If I go ahead, I will start off with the d800 and the Nikon 24-70 mm lens, and add to the kit later. But anything I expect I will be stu ck with because of the cost, so I want to make as informed choices as I can.

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

ericbowles

Atlanta, US
10530 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#17. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 16

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Mon 14-Jan-13 07:02 PM

The f/4 lenses are good lenses and represent a good value. There might be situations where you can tell the difference, but it depends on subject and style.

The ultra wide choice between the 14-24 f/2.8 and 16-35 f/4 VR is a good example. The 14-24 image quality is superb - even in corners. The lens does a great job controlling aberration and flare. But the 16-35 has filter threads supporting easier use of Grad filters circular polarizers, and ND filters. It also is much lighter, less expensive, and VR allows better use handheld with lower light levels. I chose the 16-35 since I do a lot of stream photography in the Smokies. For architectural work, the 14-24 or a tilt shift lens would make sense.

The 24-70 is a solid choice and tough to beat. While the 24-120 has good image quality, I find the 24-70 is my bread and butter lens and place a lot of value on both f/2.8 and the image quality.

The 70-200 f/2.8 is very sharp at f/3.2 to f/3.5. It's an excellent lens - my favorite. The new 70-200 f/4 is a very good alternative if you don't need f/2.8. The new 70-200 f/4 does not ship with a tripod foot, so it is a relatively expensive alternative.

I'm a little uncomfortable suggesting where you need to draw the line on quality, cropping and other tradeoffs. In relative terms, the differences are very small. My guess is other factors - weight, cost, filters, etc. - may end up being as important or more so than image quality.

Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Workshops

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#18. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 17

leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Mon 14-Jan-13 09:31 PM

I am getting closer to making my decision.

Which if any of the accessories for my Nikon D90 are likely to work with a d800?

In particular, I have a Nikon MC-DC2 cable release and a Opteka right angle viewer. I expect I will be using a cable release with the d800 fairly often, and those listed for it at the NikonUSA site are all pretty expensive. Of course, the prices are small compared to the investment in a camera and lens, so I will pay what I have to, if necessary. It just goes against the grain to spend so much on a cable release.

I do occasionally use the right angle viewer with my Nikon D90, but it may not actually be necessary for what I would do with the d800. Using the rear screen with a loupe may suffice.

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

ericbowles

Atlanta, US
10530 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#19. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 18

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Tue 15-Jan-13 12:47 AM

I don't recall what the D90 cable release is like. The D7000 uses a mini USB connector while the D800 uses the 10 pin connector. The right angle viewer for the D800 is for a round eyepiece - not the same as the rectangular eyepiece of most DX cameras.

I can sympathize - I have a right angle viewer and multiple cable releases that do not fit the D800.

The specs are online at Nikon USA.
http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Digital-SLR-Cameras/25480/D800.html

And unfortunately, Nikon has a new battery in the new cameras so that is not compatible either. There was a regulatory issue in Japan driving that one.

Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Workshops

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#20. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 19

leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Tue 15-Jan-13 01:52 AM

>I don't recall what the D90 cable release is like. The D7000
>uses a mini USB connector while the D800 uses the 10 pin
>connector. The right angle viewer for the D800 is for a round
>eyepiece - not the same as the rectangular eyepiece of most DX
>cameras.
>
>I can sympathize - I have a right angle viewer and multiple
>cable releases that do not fit the D800.
>
>The specs are online at Nikon USA.
>http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Digital-SLR-Cameras/25480/D800.html
>
>And unfortunately, Nikon has a new battery in the new cameras
>so that is not compatible either. There was a regulatory
>issue in Japan driving that one.
>
>Eric Bowles
>Nikonians Team
>My Gallery
>Workshops
>
>Nikonians membership — my most important photographic
>investment, after the camera


Will cable releases that worked with the Nikon d700 also work with the nikon d800. There are qire a few such releases at reasonable prices.

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

Henry64

DK
142 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#21. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 20

Henry64 Silver Member Nikonian since 13th Jan 2008
Tue 15-Jan-13 06:04 AM

Yes, D700 and D800 shares accessories with round 10pin plugs.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

ericbowles

Atlanta, US
10530 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#22. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 20

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Tue 15-Jan-13 09:24 AM

The 10 pin cable release is very common. There are a number of different versions from Nikon and third parties.

The third party cable release is probably a good option. It's not as well made as the Nikon release, but is a fraction of the price. I have one and have worn it out.

I also have a Nikon cable release. It's well made and there are no issues.

There are also cable releases that let you control camera settings on the release. This type of release is a good bit more expensive but useful for some types of photography.

Precision Photo is a good source of Nikon accessories and third party alternatives. I keep spare lens and body caps in my camera bag.
http://www.bocaphoto.com/products/new/nikon/nikonacc.htm

Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Workshops

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

leonardevens

US
182 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#23. "RE: What should I consider in a D800 with lens?" | In response to Reply # 22

leonardevens Gold Member Nikonian since 22nd May 2011
Thu 17-Jan-13 04:57 AM

I decided to go ahead. I want to get my D800 from Calumet Photo because I've had good experience with them in the past. Also, if I encounter any problems, I can just stop by their store in Chicago.

Meanwhile I am reading Thom Hogan's D800 guide.

I think I can make do with the camera, the 24 - 70 mm lens, an extra battery, a 64 Gb compact flash card, a card reader, and a cable release, Since I expect to crop to 4:5 aspect ratio, I figure a factor of four is right for comparing FX focal lengths with 4 x 5 focal lengths. So 24 - 70 comes close to encompassing my view camera with 90 mm, 150 mm, and 300 mm lenses. It might make sense at a future date to get the 14-24 mm lens, and eventually perhaps the 70 - 200 mm lens,

Can anyone think of anything else I might need now?

Unfortunately Calumet doesn't have the 24-70 mm lens in stock now, so I will have to wait.

Leonard Evens
Professor Emeritus, Department of Mathematics, Northwestern University

G