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Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image

jmiguez

Lafayette, US
534 posts

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jmiguez Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2010
Mon 18-Mar-13 09:54 PM

Ok friends, I have a question that I can't figure out, but I am sure one of you can. I just purchased a D800 and took it out in place of my D7000 for bird shooting out of my kayak this weekend. Here is what I am trying to figure out.

If I shoot the same bird with the D800 and the D7000 using the same lens and then crop each image so the bird fills the same size image from both cameras, which camera will put more pixels in the image?

In case I just confused you, let me restate my question. After shooting the same bird with each camera using the same 500 mm lens, I view the two images on the computer. I then crop each image so the bird looks the same size on the screen and subsequent print. Which camera's image will give me more pixels?

Did I express my question in an understandable way?

Thanks,

John

My Pictures may be seen here: http://jmiguez.smugmug.com/

briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

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#1. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 0

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Mon 18-Mar-13 09:18 PM

The DX Crop area of the D800 sensor has about 15.5 MP and the D7000 sensor has 16.1 MP. So the D7000 will have slightly more pixels covering your bird when shot with the same lens from the same distance.

But... the difference will be small - if the bird is (say) 1000 pixels across on the D7000 shot, it will be about 975 pixels across on the D800, or 2.5% fewer.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

jmiguez

Lafayette, US
534 posts

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#2. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 1

jmiguez Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2010
Tue 19-Mar-13 11:39 AM

Thanks Brian,

So, other than improved ISO there doesn't seem to be a real advantage to using the D800 for bird photography over the D7000. In fact, the D7100 might have a larger advantage over it's older sibling?

John

My Pictures may be seen here: http://jmiguez.smugmug.com/

walk43

Pennsylvania, US
719 posts

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#3. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 2

walk43 Registered since 07th Feb 2012
Tue 19-Mar-13 02:05 PM | edited Tue 19-Mar-13 02:08 PM by walk43

Also the improved DR on the D800 yielding better shadow recovery. But since you have the 500mm.... I would like to see your results with your V1/FT1 using the 500mm. (A V2 would be even better perhaps since it has more MPs).

Your 7000 with the 500mm gives you 750mm FOV on a 16mp sensor and the V2 with the 500mm gives you a 1350mm FOV on a 14MP sensor. Not quite the same MPs but real close ....and you would be at 1350mm vs 750mm.

I have found that stationary birds shot with my V1/FT1 using my 300 f/4 turn out better for me on my V1 with good sunshine. My opinion.... being 'closer' returns better feather detail than cropping.

Dan
(Nikon D800,V2,Sony HX400V,Lumix ZS40)
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jmiguez

Lafayette, US
534 posts

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#4. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 3

jmiguez Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2010
Tue 19-Mar-13 11:27 PM

Dan, I have the V1. So, I only have about 10 mp to work with there. Also, the 500 mm lens is the sigma 50-500mm. It won't work with the V1. I use the 70-300 lens on the V1 for wildlife. I get about 810 effective reach with the combo.

I didn't buy the D800 for bird photography. I bought it for landscape, macro, etc. I have read so much about it being as good as a DX camera and though I would try it out as such.

John

My Pictures may be seen here: http://jmiguez.smugmug.com/

jamesvoortman

Durban, ZA
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#5. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 4

jamesvoortman Silver Member Nikonian since 06th Sep 2004
Tue 19-Mar-13 11:53 PM

D7000 puts a few more pixels on target but the D800 has better hgih ISO capability, a more powerful AF module, AF fine tuning ( not sure if D7000 has this). Difficult to say which would give better results overall in the case mentioned.

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Clint S

Chula Vista, US
460 posts

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#6. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 0

Clint S Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jan 2011
Wed 20-Mar-13 01:25 AM

I believe the image is slightly better from the D800 than the D7000. What is more obvious is that I get a higher percentage of keepers with the D800 than the D7000.

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jmiguez

Lafayette, US
534 posts

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#7. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 6

jmiguez Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2010
Wed 20-Mar-13 08:54 AM

Clint, Why do you think you get more keepers from the D800? Also, do you shoot it in DX or FF and then crop?

I have never tried shooting it in DX. I only set it to the different formats and then looked through the viewfinder. I like that the D7000 give me a bigger image through the viewfinder.

I didn't notice any real difference in autofocus between the two. The D800 and Sigma lens did the same hunt the focus when it locked on to a branch in front of the subject. I just twisted the lens manually to bring it back.

It may have handled the different lighting conditions better? Next time, I think I will try both cameras together on the same subjects and compare. The Great Egrets have already laid eggs and are sitting on the nest. They would make good comparison subjects.

John

My Pictures may be seen here: http://jmiguez.smugmug.com/

walk43

Pennsylvania, US
719 posts

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#8. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 7

walk43 Registered since 07th Feb 2012
Wed 20-Mar-13 10:06 AM | edited Wed 20-Mar-13 10:38 AM by walk43

>>I have never tried shooting it in DX. I only set it to the different formats and then looked through the viewfinder. I like that the D7000 give me a bigger image through the viewfinder.<<

John,

When you set the D800 to AUTO DX ON in the menu(image area), the camera will set the VF to automatically accommodate a DX lens in the viewfinder with a rectangle indicating the typical DX (1.5 crop)format FOV.

If you set the Auto DX option to OFF and use a DX lens you will have the full FX view (with some vignetting in the corners) without the DX in camera crop. (DX OFF on a 300mm DX lens gives you 300mm FOV vs the 450mm cropped factor). You can do the same thing in the format option of the D800 'image area'. If you set the camera to DX format (or other format) the camera will place a rectangle for that format in the VF and apply a crop factor to the recorded image.

Most of us see no need to set the D800 to a specific format unless you need the added 'reach' for manual focus, composition or some other reason. See more in the instruction manual it will be simpler than trying to explain it here.

Bottom line is that with the D800 you have the advantage of keeping the 'full VF' to look through... and especially for BIF ... giving you some area to play with when leading the BIF's...etc.

The D800 takes a little getting used to with technique etc.....but you will get there!!

Dan
(Nikon D800,V2,Sony HX400V,Lumix ZS40)
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Clint S

Chula Vista, US
460 posts

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#9. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 7

Clint S Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jan 2011
Thu 21-Mar-13 01:59 AM

John,
When first using the D800 I did not think the focusing system was necessarily better. But the more I shot and compared the number of keepers to the same events the year before, I am just getting more photos that I keep due to sharpness. This is true for events inside as well as outside.

I did use just the D7000 for a couple of events and the keeper percentage was comparative to the same events the previous year. My skill level has not changed and I've been using the same lenses, so I attribute the difference to the D800.

When I bought the D800 I thought I could use it as a dual mode camera, FX and DX. One of the first things I did was to make sure the DX auto mode was off and I set up a button to quickly access the crop modes.

But my habit of filling the frame with my subject seems to overcome the obvious crop lines or darkened area in the D800 view finder (turn on and off the Autofocus point illumination (#A5) to see the difference). I have quit trying to use any of the crop modes, I just can't seem to stay within the virtual boundaries.

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jmiguez

Lafayette, US
534 posts

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#10. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 9

jmiguez Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2010
Thu 21-Mar-13 08:54 AM

Thanks for the inputs, guys. Hopefully, I will get an opportunity this weekend to compare the different cameras at the lake. However, my wife is making me mow and clean up the yard this weekend.

I tried to tell her letting the lawn go natural would be good for attracting wildlife photo opportunities. When that didn't fly, I reminded her of the carbon footprint the lawnmower makes and how taller grass and weeds would add more oxygen to the atmosphere and counter global warming.

.....I will be mowing and trimming this weekend.

John

My Pictures may be seen here: http://jmiguez.smugmug.com/

ericbowles

Atlanta, US
10633 posts

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#11. "RE: Cropped D800 image vs. Cropped D7000 image" | In response to Reply # 10

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Thu 21-Mar-13 06:58 PM

John

My experience is the same as Clint reported - the D800 produces more keepers even cropped. I was at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm a few weeks ago and used both cameras. The D800E was much better under demanding conditions such as a small heron flying and picking up food.

For static subjects or easy to follow subjects such as my dog photography, the D7000 is just fine and has a very high success rate.

The comparison Daniel Cox ran on the D4, D800, and D600 probably applies to the D7000 as well. The D600 did well, but not as well as the higher end cameras.
http://www.naturalexposures.com/corkboard/testing-the-nikon-d4-d800-d600-in-predictive-auto-focus/


Eric Bowles
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