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Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera

KHR

LaSalle, CA
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KHR Gold Member Nikonian since 04th Jan 2009
Mon 24-Dec-12 02:36 AM

I have used the D300 for the past few years and found that I was finally getteing confident with my photography and my camera. So I made the jump to the D800. My first full frame. I have always read that once you go to full frame your photography and the images will improve. But what I have found was that I felt like I was starting photography over again. Using my flashes is different, I have a hard time getting tack sharp images, my depth of field seems to be very shallow even at f11. Is depth f field different on full frame? I just find myself grabbing my D300 when I have to shoot something important because I can't trust that I'm going to be able to get sharp, usable images at the same settings on both cameras. I need clarity on what should I have expected jumping to the full frame D800?

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walkerr

Colorado Springs, US
16903 posts

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#1. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Master Ribbon awarded as a member who has gone beyond technical knowledge to show mastery of the art and science of photography   Donor Ribbon awarded for his most generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 05th May 2002
Mon 24-Dec-12 02:46 AM

You shouldn't anything magical to happen with a full frame camera. Depth of field is about a stop less than you get with a DX equivalent body and lens, but you're probably looking at your images a heck of a lot closer than you did before. The higher magnification you use to examine a given scene, the more you'll notice small changes in focus. That doesn't mean it will show up in similarly sized prints, and large prints from both formats will magnify differences in focus. I'm not sure why you're having trouble with your flashes - they work pretty much the same way they did with your D300.

My personal experience switching from a DX DSLR to an FX DSLR was that it was like returning back to the 35 SLR days in terms of lens options (which I liked), and I appreciated the greater flexibility in working with images in post-processing. I quickly stopped using my D300 for normal photography and eventually converted it to infrared, which I like quite a bit.

Rick Walker

My photos:

GeoVista Photography

Escaladieu

Artiguemy, FR
943 posts

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#2. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

Escaladieu Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Apr 2010
Mon 24-Dec-12 05:40 AM | edited Mon 24-Dec-12 05:41 AM by Escaladieu

>I have used the D300 for the past few years and found that I
>was finally getteing confident with my photography and my
>camera. So I made the jump to the D800. My first full frame. I
>have always read that once you go to full frame your
>photography and the images will improve. But what I have found
>was that I felt like I was starting photography over again.
>Using my flashes is different, I have a hard time getting tack
>sharp images, my depth of field seems to be very shallow even
>at f11. Is depth f field different on full frame? I just find
>myself grabbing my D300 when I have to shoot something
>important because I can't trust that I'm going to be able to
>get sharp, usable images at the same settings on both cameras.
>I need clarity on what should I have expected jumping to the
>full frame D800?
>





What you shoud have expected is the following
More dynamic range
Better high ISO performance
Better AF system
More Resolution
Reduced DOF

To get these benefits you need to learn the camera - the high resolution is intolerant of user error

I could not get sharp images either when I started with the D800 - now I can -

To get sharp images
1) check if your each of your lenses needs AF fine tune - to make a quick check use flash - Manual mode - Auto ISO off SS 1/250 sec widest aperture. Make sure there's enough ambient light for the autofocus to work properly. The images should be sharp using flash - if not you need to verify if the lens need AF fine tune - use focal or a focus chart. I had to tune ALL my lenses.

2) Once the camera is tuned for the lenses determine the min shutter speed for your current shooting technique -

Mount a 50mm prime & set the camera to manual mode with auto ISO set on, the shutter speed to 1/650 sec & aperture to say, 5.6.

Shoot the same target & decrease the shutter speed 1 stop at a time until you reach 1/50. Examine the images & find the min shooting speed that yields sharp images. You can reduce the shutter speed that gives sharp images by improving your technique.

Yesterday I tested myself & the D800 by walking the dog on a leash and shooting a load of test shots one handed. With 50mm mounted & shutter speed 1/500 - all sharp - no exception. Shooting with proper technique I can get sharp images at 1/100 (50mm) reliably. It's just a matter of being methodical.


Enjoy the D800, its great !

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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3559 posts

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#3. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Mon 24-Dec-12 09:21 AM | edited Mon 24-Dec-12 09:23 AM by km6xz

I found that my minimum hand held shutter speed needed to be higher with the D800 than the D7000 even though they have about the same pixel density. The D7000 requires faster shutter than the D90 which has similar pixel density as your D300. Once you get it dialed in, you will find that every imaginable IQ criteria is better with the D800, from AF to metering to noise at any ISO etc.
The DOF is the same as DX if you move to the same point that results in the same VF subject size. F/11 is well into Diffraction so any more stopped down and you will be losing ultimate sharpness....but even if greatly defraction limited, the images will still be sharper than a D300. When you get used to it, and used to the higher shutter and higher resulting ISO needed to get it, you will be very happy with it.
Here is a shot I would have just passed on with either the D90 or D300s due to extremely low light. Shot in pub with no interior lights on for some strange reason, the only light in the room was back-lit evening windows during a rain storm 90 minutes after sundown. That meant the 85 1.4G was wide open, 1/100, and ISO 12,600! I was focusing on the camera right eye, which I could not see at all, just black so the spec of -2EV for AF is an understatement. No NR, no post except a little tweaking of WB since the image had a blue cast and pushing exposure +1 ev in LR.
This was taken Friday used a lens kindly loaned to my by a fellow Nikonian, Peter, in San Jose since I was traveling light with only 2 lenses(24-70 and 70-200). It might not be great but it would have been impossible with any DX camera.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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jamesvoortman

Durban, ZA
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#4. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

jamesvoortman Silver Member Nikonian since 06th Sep 2004
Mon 24-Dec-12 09:45 AM | edited Mon 24-Dec-12 09:54 AM by jamesvoortman

Great pic Stan - as usual!

This forum is full of posts asking the same thing in different ways. I also come from years of D300 experience (D200, D70 before that) and have had to make some adjustments.

The D800 has the highest pixel resolution currently available in 35mm format. This means you can look deeper into the images when viewing on your computer - and you are thus more likely to see imperfections that would not appear in a print of normal size, or when viewed normally on a monitor. Try downsizing your D800 images to 12 Mp and compare them with images shot on your D300. I'm betting the differences will be less apparent but you will see a lot less noise and better shadow detail with the D800 pics.


Depth of field : Using the same lens and same aperture on D300 and D800 you will find the actual depth field is the same in that the in-focus region starts and ends at the same distances from the camera but since the D300 shoots a DX crop its images will appear to have relatively MORE depth of field because of the narrower field of view.

Putting it another way : Shoot an image at about 80mm with your D800. When using your D300, you'll need a 50mm focal length to give about the same field of view. Shot with same settings in the same light, the D300 image will have relatively more depth of field.

Adjsutments you can make :
1) Shoot your D800 in DX crop mode - the viewfinder image may appear smaller but the results should be better than your D300 because of the superior sensor in D800.
2) Be prepared to go smaller than f11. People over-rate the diffraction issue. It is better to have your focus (theoretically) slightly degraded by diffraction at small f-stops than to have large portions of a landscape photo in soft focus because you wanted to avoid diffraction issues! I had my first good mountain scenery session with my D800 recently and in spite of the new 24-120VR being vastly better than my old 18-200, I was caught by the aperture thing in the same way. I used mostly f10 to f13 which would have been good enough with the D300 - but my shots show me that I should have used f16 to f22

Focus/Sharpness issue : The D300, like all DX cameras, takes the sweet-spot out of FX lenses so you can expect better corner to corner focus but you need wider lenses with more distortion to get the same field of view. The smaller pixel pitch of D800 also means that a small amount of camera movement during exposure will be more visible. I have also noticed that I can feel the movement of the relatively bigger (heavier) mirror when activating the shutter.
Adjustments you can make :
1) use higher shutter speed when handholding. Typically I am finding that I need to use shutter speeds of 2x 1/focal length. e.g. 1/125 with a 50mm lens and 1/250 with a 105mm
2) brace the camera more securely when shooting by using your body, knees, face to stiffen the hold. Use VR if available on your lenses.
3) use Mup release mode or set a mirror/shutter delay time in custom settings when using the camera on a tripod. This helps to reduce mirror induced vibration
4) read the D800 technical guide Here (select your D800 with the "Select Product" button and then select "User Manuals").


I am getting some wickedly sharp and extraordinarily detailed images from my D800 - so when it does not deliver I know that the reason was poor technique on my part.

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KHR

LaSalle, CA
234 posts

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#5. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 4

KHR Gold Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2009
Mon 24-Dec-12 03:42 PM | edited Mon 24-Dec-12 04:10 PM by KHR

Thank you everyone for your reponses. I'll go through everything that you've all suggested trying. I had a feeling that it was either bad camera our technique. I could just be looking too closely at my images. I'm my toughest critic. I always look for perfection and always try to achieve it. I'll also try fine tuning my lenses. Anyone have any good ways to do this? Thanks again and hope everyone has wonderful and safe holidays with beautiful images.

Kelly

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briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

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#6. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 5

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Mon 24-Dec-12 03:59 PM

>I'll also try fine tuning my lenses.

I wouldn't recommend this procedure until you've eliminated the other possibilities that have been mentioned.AF Fine Tune can be a useful feature, but it needs to be applied with care. If you do want to try it, there have been many discussions on the methodology in this Forum over the past few months

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

Ferguson

Cape Coral, US
5696 posts

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#7. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 6

Ferguson Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for the generous sharing of his high level expertise in the spirit of Nikonians Nikonian since 19th Aug 2004
Mon 24-Dec-12 05:31 PM | edited Mon 24-Dec-12 05:33 PM by Ferguson

>>I'll also try fine tuning my lenses.
>
>I wouldn't recommend this procedure until you've eliminated
>the other possibilities that have been mentioned.AF Fine Tune
>can be a useful feature, but it needs to be applied with care.
> If you do want to try it, there have been many discussions on
>the methodology in this Forum over the past few months

I absolutely agree with the "with care", but I think given the higher expectations people have with the camera, that it does benefit one to do the fine tune pro-actively. My D800 went through a repair and calibration by Nikon, and it still has adjustments ranging from 0 to 12, and that 12 really does show a lot of difference versus 0 (example focus shown, enlarged).

I do agree if one is happy stay happy. But if you start feeling you are not getting what you expect, I would suggest read up carefully on both technique and pros and cons of how you test, realize it is VERY easy to screw it up, realize someone will TELL You that you screwed it up no matter what you try. But I think it is worthwhile if you have questions.


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Incidentally I put up the D4 results so this doesn't turn into a "The D800 is bad" discussion. I just think as we all get more into "high scrutiny" photography, this is a real component of it.

Linwood

Comments welcomed on pictures: Http://captivephotons.com



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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
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#8. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Tue 25-Dec-12 06:35 AM

I am with Brian on this one, don't do anything regarding fine tuning untl you have a solid diagnosis on what is causing your problem. Please post some images that demonstrate the problem you are concerned about, that would help a lot in moving the discussion from the random speculation realm to an effective diagnostic realm.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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AZBlue

US
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#9. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

AZBlue Registered since 09th Jun 2012
Tue 25-Dec-12 05:25 PM

>I have always read that once you go to full frame your
>photography and the images will improve. But what I have found
>was that I felt like I was starting photography over again.

Your first mistake was thinking that buying bigger, more expensive equipment was somehow going to make you a better photographer

AZBlue

US
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#10. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 3

AZBlue Registered since 09th Jun 2012
Tue 25-Dec-12 05:27 PM

Would it have killed you to use some fill flash?

ajdooley

Waterloo, US
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#11. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 9

ajdooley Gold Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006
Wed 26-Dec-12 08:37 PM | edited Wed 26-Dec-12 11:06 PM by ajdooley

AZ - I'm going to weigh in here with what has no doubt gone through the minds of some of the other Nikonians here. You need to look at your remarks. Stan is a superb photographer, who was simply illustrating to Kelly a few points about the added care the full frame format at much higher resolutions requires to get the results he desires. Kelly in turn, is trying to see where he needs to turn to realize his expectations. Neither asked for the critical remarks you made. This group is different than many forums. It features a sense of civility and friendship. It is a place where people can ask any question -- there are no dumb ones (people or questions) -- and usually get a very good, quick and accurate answer from other members who are happy to share their knowledge, experience and encouragement. Join us and help your fellow members instead of criticizing them. And please fill out your profile so we can get to know you better.

Alan
Waterloo, IL, USA
www.proimagingmidamerica.com

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dm1dave

Lowden, US
13618 posts

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#12. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 9

dm1dave Administrator Awarded for high level knowledge and skills in various areas, most notably in Wildlife and Landscape Writer Ribbon awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Nikonians community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 12th Sep 2006
Thu 27-Dec-12 12:30 AM | edited Thu 27-Dec-12 12:32 AM by dm1dave

Sonny,

As a Nikonians Moderator, I fully agree with Alan’s remarks above.

We are here to help each other to learn and grow as photographers. Your comments in this thread are not helpful; they are demeaning and could be taken as personal insults.

Please take some time to reacquaint yourself with our Terms of Use.

Particularly...

2.1. We believe everyone has something to contribute to the community, no matter the level of expertise. No questions are stupid; they force us to re-think on issues and the answers. In other words, don't hesitate to post. The more you post, the more you read, the more you read the more you and all of us learn.

2.2. We believe that each member is basically honest and is capable of showing respect towards other community members and be friendly.

Dave Summers
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JohnInsa

Bedfordview, ZA
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#13. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

JohnInsa Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jun 2009
Thu 27-Dec-12 04:08 PM

Hey Kelly

Like yourself, I have been using a D300 and a D300S for the last three years and have enjoyed immensely the results I was getting, and again, like yourself, having only then gone from film to a DSLR and having achieved decent results there, I thought it was time to step up the game a tad lolol

Enter a Nikon D800 and a very nervous photographer!!! As all have said here before me, the additional resolution is not anything like as forgiving as the D300 and this is highlighted even further as one moves up the focal length scale. I have found that by going back to basic techniques of shooting, like taking a deep breath at shot time, tucking in the elbows etc has helped me hugely. I am not for one minute suggesting you don't have these techniques, but I am sort of saying that for me, the D300 allowed me to go backwards into bad shooting habits because of its forgiving nature, this sadly is not the case with the D800.

I have no doubt you will find the D800 a fantastic camera and whilst it might take a little more initial work, it wont take long to fine tune and get astounding pictures again.

Good luck and please let us know how you get on.

BTW I agree wholeheartedly with the comments posted about criticism, that to me was the beauty of joining Nikonians in the first place, nothing was too simple to ask and everyone (or almost everyone) has always been extremely helpful and long may that be the case.

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danshep

Olympia, US
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#14. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 13

danshep Gold Member Charter Member
Thu 27-Dec-12 07:17 PM


With your skills improving on the D800, your photos with the D300 will likely improve, too.




"Today is the tomorrow that yesterday you spent money like there was no"

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geoffc

San Pedro, US
132 posts

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#15. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

geoffc Registered since 21st Apr 2008
Fri 28-Dec-12 08:50 PM

Reduce your D800 images back down to 12mp, and you'll see they will look the same as the D300 images, most likely better.

What sort of images are you trying to shoot?
If you're shooting landscapes or detailed images f8 and narrower, you'd want to be shooting on a tripod anyway. DOF should not be an issue at f/11, I'd be very curious to see a sample image.

If you're shooting portraits or sports, you'll generally be at 5.6 or wider, which then comes down to a matter of nailing focus for sharpness. Also crank up the ISO a bit so your shutter speed stays fast to avoid blur. ISO quality was the biggest jump I saw when going from a D300 to D700, you should feel free to indulge without loss of quality.

Bottom line, unless you are locking down on a tripod, using live view focus to nail a detailed shot, a 1:1 view of a hand held 36mp D800 image is most likely going to look less sharp than a similar 1:1 view of a D300 image.

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walkerr

Colorado Springs, US
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#16. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 15

walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Master Ribbon awarded as a member who has gone beyond technical knowledge to show mastery of the art and science of photography   Donor Ribbon awarded for his most generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 05th May 2002
Fri 28-Dec-12 09:21 PM


>
>Bottom line, unless you are locking down on a tripod, using
>live view focus to nail a detailed shot, a 1:1 view of a hand
>held 36mp D800 image is most likely going to look less sharp
>than a similar 1:1 view of a D300 image.

I read that a lot, but it's not my experience. I don't handhold the camera at ridiculously low shutter speeds, and I take advantage of VR when I can. Those two things give me sharp handheld images with my D800e and D800, just like they did with my D700.

Rick Walker

My photos:

GeoVista Photography

KHR

LaSalle, CA
234 posts

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#17. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 15

KHR Gold Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2009
Sun 30-Dec-12 01:23 AM

>Reduce your D800 images back down to 12mp, and you'll see
>they will look the same as the D300 images, most likely
>better.
>
>What sort of images are you trying to shoot?
>If you're shooting landscapes or detailed images f8 and
>narrower, you'd want to be shooting on a tripod anyway. DOF
>should not be an issue at f/11, I'd be very curious to see a
>sample image.
>
>If you're shooting portraits or sports, you'll generally be at
>5.6 or wider, which then comes down to a matter of nailing
>focus for sharpness. Also crank up the ISO a bit so your
>shutter speed stays fast to avoid blur. ISO quality was the
>biggest jump I saw when going from a D300 to D700, you should
>feel free to indulge without loss of quality.
>
>Bottom line, unless you are locking down on a tripod, using
>live view focus to nail a detailed shot, a 1:1 view of a hand
>held 36mp D800 image is most likely going to look less sharp
>than a similar 1:1 view of a D300 image.

I've been shooting some events and a wedding that I shot about a week after I got he camera. I did some Fall family portraits. After doing some of the things others have suggested about testing my auto focus. It's seems that it may be off. I did order the LensAlign that should be in next week.

One thing that I did notice is that when I set my focus through he view finder at a specific spot (camera on tripod and target stable) that when I switched to live view the focus point was not on the same spot. It was over to one side of where it was through the view finder. I don't think this should be like this. They should be both focused on the same spot. Another thing that I noticed is that when shooting a target that is parallel to the camera that the one side is in focus and the other side is slightly out of focus. Same when photographing someone looking straight at the camera the one eye is soft and one somewhat sharp.

I plan to do some calibrations when the LensAlign comes in and I will show the results once I get a computer running again. I've been using my tablet for the past couple of weeks due to a computer crash.

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Ferguson

Cape Coral, US
5696 posts

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#18. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 17

Ferguson Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for the generous sharing of his high level expertise in the spirit of Nikonians Nikonian since 19th Aug 2004
Sun 30-Dec-12 12:52 PM

>One thing that I did notice is that when I set my focus
>through he view finder at a specific spot (camera on tripod
>and target stable) that when I switched to live view the focus
>point was not on the same spot. It was over to one side of
>where it was through the view finder. I don't think this
>should be like this. They should be both focused on the same
>spot.

I do not have the camera handy to try, but I thought the opposite -- I thought that the setting in Live View and Viewfinder were independent and is remembered from the last time in live view. A brief look at the manual didn't show anything on the subject.

>Another thing that I noticed is that when shooting a
>target that is parallel to the camera that the one side is in
>focus and the other side is slightly out of focus. Same when
>photographing someone looking straight at the camera the one
>eye is soft and one somewhat sharp.

Now that's a new one, and is not related to ANY of the "left side AF" issues, as that implies the sensor/lens combination is not aligned. I'd suggest trying other lenses and something carefully controlled to be sure. Do you have a filter on the lens, if so I'd recommend at least trying without.


Linwood

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RWSTARRETT

Gardnerville, US
145 posts

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#19. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 0

RWSTARRETT Gold Member Nikonian since 03rd Feb 2009
Sun 30-Dec-12 06:32 PM

Now this is one of the more useful/educational threads I have seen...period. Thank you all! I contributed nothing, but have had the same issues with my D800, even versus my D700. My D800 and this web site is going to make me a better photographer.

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KHR

LaSalle, CA
234 posts

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#20. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 18

KHR Gold Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2009
Sun 30-Dec-12 07:30 PM | edited Sun 30-Dec-12 07:31 PM by KHR

I do have a filter, but never thought about taking it off or that it could cause any issues. But I guess it is just a piece of glass and it could have a flaw in it.

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Ferguson

Cape Coral, US
5696 posts

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#21. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 20

Ferguson Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for the generous sharing of his high level expertise in the spirit of Nikonians Nikonian since 19th Aug 2004
Sun 30-Dec-12 09:02 PM

>I do have a filter, but never thought about taking it off or
>that it could cause any issues. But I guess it is just a piece
>of glass and it could have a flaw in it.

It's more about eliminating all possibilities to narrow it down, seems unlikely to be a one-sided issue even then, but who knows.

Linwood

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txstone12

Texas, US
599 posts

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#22. "RE: Need clarity about what I should have expected with full frame a camera" | In response to Reply # 2

txstone12 Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 12th Feb 2012
Mon 31-Dec-12 03:09 PM

>
>I could not get sharp images either when I started with the
>D800 - now I can -
>
>To get sharp images
>
>2) Once the camera is tuned for the lenses determine the min
>shutter speed for your current shooting technique -
>
>Mount a 50mm prime & set the camera to manual mode with
>auto ISO set on, the shutter speed to 1/650 sec & aperture
>to say, 5.6.
>
>Shoot the same target & decrease the shutter speed 1 stop
>at a time until you reach 1/50. Examine the images & find
>the min shooting speed that yields sharp images. You can
>reduce the shutter speed that gives sharp images by improving
>your technique.
>
>Yesterday I tested myself & the D800 by walking the dog on
>a leash and shooting a load of test shots one handed. With
>50mm mounted & shutter speed 1/500 - all sharp - no
>exception. Shooting with proper technique I can get sharp
>images at 1/100 (50mm) reliably. It's just a matter of being
>methodical.
>

Jeff,

I wanted to drop by to encourage you to also post your technique ideas in the D800 Technique forum

https://www.nikonians.org/forums/dcboard.php?az=show_topic&forum=430&topic_id=19886&mesg_id=19886&page=2

I think your idea for how to find your own effective minimum shutter speed is very helpful. I also like the suggestion for practicing (one handed or however people like to practice).

You probably have more ideas on technique. I thought these suggestions were helpful to consider for our own personal technique kit.

BTW, I really enjoyed your gallery of landscape photos. Your area of France is gorgeous and you are conveying that through your beautiful images. Thanks.

David

Visit my Nikonians gallery

G