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gjsgarren

US
17 posts

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gjsgarren Registered since 06th Mar 2011
Sun 25-Nov-12 11:52 PM

Ok, so I have wanted the 800 since before it came out - I enjoy landscapes (printed large), macro gadgets with details, etc etc - should be perfect for a 36MP camera!

BUT... the unanswered question -purposely avoided by Nikon - what are the odds of having to deal with a bad instrument right out of the box?? Most of the posts here seem negative and many have multiple or seemingly unending poor results.

Is there a bright side to this anywhere?? I guess I am HOPEFUL that the focus issue occurs in only a small fraction of total production and those speaking out in this forum are the outlying points in a statistical analysis that Nikon must have conducted but not made public.

Please help as I can not make a purchase decision with the current data.

Garren

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SirPuttsAlot

Poughquag, US
354 posts

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#1. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

SirPuttsAlot Registered since 26th Sep 2011
Sun 25-Nov-12 10:55 PM

My first unit did have the left focus issue, but until I read about it and tested for it, I did not notice the issue in any real world shooting. That said, Crutchfield exchanged my "faulty" D800 with another unit and it has been 100% perfect. No complaints or issues here.

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EricBarney

US
32 posts

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#2. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 1

EricBarney Registered since 02nd Oct 2012
Sun 25-Nov-12 11:23 PM

I have yet to find anything wrong with my D800. No issues to report here. The camera is just plain awesome!

kamputty

Santa Cruz, US
197 posts

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#3. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

kamputty Registered since 04th Jan 2007
Sun 25-Nov-12 11:32 PM

Mine also is perfect out of the box...

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RRRoger

Monterey Bay, US
3373 posts

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#4. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 3

RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter Member
Mon 26-Nov-12 02:17 AM

Mine is perfect but
it did take me a month to dial in the settings and improve my shooting style.
Remember this about high res cameras.
More pixels show detail and user errors mo beta.

As for getting a good copy and the camera you really want,
there is no substitute for "Hands On".

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mklass

Tacoma, US
7421 posts

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#5. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 4

mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006
Mon 26-Nov-12 02:41 AM | edited Mon 26-Nov-12 02:42 AM by mklass

Mine was fine right out of the box.

If you are nervous, buy one, test it immediately, and return it for a refund or exchange if you aren't satisfied.

Like Roger, it took me a few outings to get the hang of the D800. It is not as forgiving as other cameras.

Mick
http://www.mickklassphoto.com
or
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jtmcg

Simsbury, US
4987 posts

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#6. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

jtmcg Moderator Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Awarded for his high level skills, specially in Wildlife, Macro & Landscape Photography Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 22nd Mar 2007
Mon 26-Nov-12 10:44 AM

Mine worked perfectly out of the box and it's a great camera. I'd guess that at this point the odds are that you'll have no problem and that you'll love the camera.

John

Grey_Scale

US
21 posts

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#7. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 4

Grey_Scale Registered since 24th Sep 2012
Mon 26-Nov-12 11:51 AM

I would have to agree. The more I use it the the better I get. No issues whatsoever.

Ken

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Skyco

Roanoke Island, US
171 posts

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#8. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

Skyco Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Mar 2012
Mon 26-Nov-12 12:48 PM | edited Mon 26-Nov-12 12:58 PM by Skyco

Hi Garren,

My D800 worked fine right out of the box. I ordered it in February and got it mid-July. After about a month of shooting (I had D800 withdrawal if I didn't take photographs with it every day), there was a crack in the sensor - I never touched the sensor or lifted the mirror to look at the sensor. Nikon replaced the sensor on warranty and appeared to have checked the AF as well. I had been experimenting with AF C 3D when I sent my camera to NY, and it was in AF S single point when I got it back. There was also a small issue I had with the memory card door, which they also fixed, and my D800 was back in my hands two weeks from the day I sent it. For me, my experience with Nikon repair was great.

If you haven't looked at Nikon's D800 "Digitutor" you might find that worthwhile too.
http://www.nikondigitutor.com/eng/d800/index.html

I strongly suggest that you also get one of the books on the D800 if you buy the camera. I have Darrell Young's "Mastering the Nikon D800" and find it indispensable. This camera has lots and lots of features and options, AND the manual don't give a clue when or if to use them.

I agree with Roger whole hardly that the D800 requires practice, patience and experimenting with the settings to find what works best for you and your style of shooting. Careful focusing techniques with the D800 will be rewarded with fantastic photos.

I love my D800 and I've always been thankful that I bought it!

Well Wishes,

Ken



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richardd300

Dyserth, UK
4507 posts

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#9. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 8

richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009
Mon 26-Nov-12 01:37 PM

I, like you, was extremely nervous of upgrading to a D800. I have to say it's without any doubt it's the best Nikon I've ever bought. I said that about the D700, but the D800 exceeded all my expectations.

I've had no problems although I would echo Ken when he says to buy a good book. I have both Darrell's book and Thom Hogan's truly wonderful guide to the D800. Both give valuable information on how to achieve the very best out of the camera.

I would forget now all the negative talk as I have, that's history for most although those who suffered may think differently of course.

Richard

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The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. Einstein

Carmen Tulum

Toronto, CA
43 posts

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#10. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

Carmen Tulum Registered since 09th Nov 2012
Mon 26-Nov-12 03:09 PM

I bought my camera middle August (from Henry's) and its got the focus problem. In addition to this, the exposure was/is (still waiting for it to arrive back from Nikon) also w-a-y out and erratic. Im anxiously awaiting its return from Nikon and I'm sad that I had to pay the same as everyone payed and received such a faulty camera in 2 such important issues - I lost beautiful shots (and some confidence in myself ) Could not understand how everyone says the exposure is so perfect while I had to sweat my way through getting correct exposure.
No word from Nikon except that "they adjusted the focus & the exposure).

GaryPk

Bailey, US
537 posts

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#11. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 10

GaryPk Silver Member Nikonian since 30th Apr 2012
Mon 26-Nov-12 03:52 PM | edited Mon 26-Nov-12 03:56 PM by GaryPk

I didn't even test mine yet for the left focus issue and I have had it for 3 months ... I like to photograph similar to you.

I use Manual Focus for Macros and Live View focus for Landscapes neither of which are influenced by a potential left focus issue. Both of which are better than AF for these applications even if left-AF is working perfectly. Couldn't be happier with the D800e now that I am well into the learning curve.

Gary

www.GaryPackPhotography.com

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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3559 posts

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#12. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Mon 26-Nov-12 07:56 PM

The odds of getting a perfect camera are really high.

But it will be 100% ifo you do the logical thing, take your best FX wider lens to the store and try it before handing over your money. If there left focus is off, it is really off. Use a wide angle prime if possible, say a 24 1.4 wide open and try it in the store.

There are a lot of reasons to deal with your local pro shop instead of out of state mass marketers. It is good to have local expertise available to help if you need questions answered or something checked out, which on-line stores can't and wouldn't do.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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richardd300

Dyserth, UK
4507 posts

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#13. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 12

richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009
Mon 26-Nov-12 08:25 PM | edited Mon 26-Nov-12 08:25 PM by richardd300

Stan. I did go to a retailer, London Camera Exchange, but I didn't take a wide angle, but a 50mm f1.8 and aimed towards a book shelf and the books. I shifted the focus point from far left to far right and top to bottom, zoomed in on that point on each image and all were sharp. I guess that's not perhaps the same test, but I think it was a sensible attempt. When I got home I tested it with my 16-35mm at 16mm and all was fine.

Richard

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The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. Einstein

LMMiller9

Potomac, US
1168 posts

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#14. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

LMMiller9 Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2005
Tue 27-Nov-12 12:56 AM

I think you have to realize that many come to this forum because they are having a problem. If everything is working fine, you may say nothing. So, there is a strong bias toward problems.

I received mine in the first batch shipped because I had been on a list for one year prior. I have had no problems at all. My only problem is finding subjects worthy of the camera's potential.

Larry Miller, Potomac, MD
DF/D810
http://lmmillerphotography.smugmug.com/

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EricBarney

US
32 posts

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#15. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 14

EricBarney Registered since 02nd Oct 2012
Tue 27-Nov-12 01:18 AM

My only problem is finding subjects worthy of the camera's potential.

I have that exact same problem! Maybe we should start a class action suit? )

michell

Tregunc, FR
1 posts

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#16. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 13

michell Registered since 05th Oct 2012
Tue 27-Nov-12 06:15 AM

Hi Richard,

Do you mean that you didn't fire the shutter?

and only looking at each focus point, allowed you to determine the sharpness?

I am asking because I want to go from a D200 to a D800 and, in the store, I wont be allowed to activate the shutter count of the camera I am looking at.

Michel

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richardd300

Dyserth, UK
4507 posts

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#17. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 16

richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009
Tue 27-Nov-12 06:48 AM

I actually loaded a CF card and took 2 images of each focus point (far left, far right, top and bottom). Apart from zooming in and checking in-store I was able to keep the images to check in more detail at home. I did this and was pleased with the results. The camera shop was more than helpful and fully understood my reasons for doing it, although they did say I was the first person who ever who had done it.

Richard

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The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. Einstein

Carmen Tulum

Toronto, CA
43 posts

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#18. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 14

Carmen Tulum Registered since 09th Nov 2012
Tue 27-Nov-12 11:47 AM

>>>" I think you have to realize that many come
to this forum because they are having a problem. If everything
is working fine, you may say nothing. So, there is a strong
bias toward problems. >>>>>

oops, this is an assumption that is totally unverified....for
all I know it might be the other way round. Maybe Nikonians
are not randomly selected samples of the Nikon users
population... maybe they are. Who knows?

I, for one, did not come here because I had a problem.  I came
here to discuss the D800.

Since then, I have learned that I do have, not only a focus
problem, but also and exposure problem.

venusian

US
186 posts

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#19. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 18

venusian Registered since 17th Dec 2008
Tue 27-Nov-12 12:07 PM

I feel the real issue here is not how many pleased or disappointed D800 camera owners there are but how Nikon has handled the whole left-focus issue from corporate down to tech support. There are enough posts in the D800 forum to realize that this is true and that no one in their right mind wants to get stuck with a $3000 camera that does not focus properly.

I am fortunate. I have a properly focusing D800E that was purchased mid-September. If I were buying today, I would purchase from a retailer who has a solid, consumer-friendly return policy with enough time to do some focus point testing after the camera has been purchased. B&H is a good example as are others.

Nick (Roxbury, Connecticut Nikonian)

Carmen Tulum

Toronto, CA
43 posts

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#20. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 19

Carmen Tulum Registered since 09th Nov 2012
Tue 27-Nov-12 12:16 PM

thank you very much, Nick, for wrapping it up like this - I agree with you (by the way, I used your books-on-a-bookshelve method to test my left focus issue)

rplst8

Johnstown, US
150 posts

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#21. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

rplst8 Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2008
Tue 27-Nov-12 12:51 PM

>what are the odds of having to deal with a bad instrument
>right out of the box?? Most of the posts here seem negative
>and many have multiple or seemingly unending poor results.

Thom Hogan and others have hinted that there was a higher than normal chance of getting a camera with the asymmetric focus issue (i.e. soft results when using the leftmost focus point).

Recently, Thom as talked about some exposure issues with the 16-35mm and that he feels it's in the single digit percentages. He also indicated he's comfortable with that, and it's probably normal and not a QA problem like the D800 had.

Granted, this is just one man's opinion, but based on the traffic I've seen about the issue, and the 5 other people I've been in contact with that also had the issue, I feel the D800 problems were 10% or slightly higher, but not something like 40 or 50%.

That said, Nikon seems to have resolved the problems on the production lines and they no longer have this issue with new D800s.

The problem I see is that Nikon USA doesn't fully understand how to fix the cameras that do have the problem. They made it worse in some cases. Of the five people I've been emailing back and forth about the problem, one has sold their D800, three others are satisfied with their fix, and one is still not satisfied. I feel they have left some users out to dry on this issue, and the right thing to do would be to offer them a new camera with a higher serial number and take the unsatisfactory cameras in for testing and refurbish them.

>Is there a bright side to this anywhere?? I guess I am
>HOPEFUL that the focus issue occurs in only a small fraction
>of total production and those speaking out in this forum are
>the outlying points in a statistical analysis that Nikon must
>have conducted but not made public.

The bright side? I would say that regardless of the D800s focus problems it's the most amazing sensor to grace a DSLR body, ever. The dynamic range is amazing and it can produce stunningly sharp images.

You can take a look at some of my work with a "broken" D800 here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanlantzy/tags/d800/

--
RL

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briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

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#22. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 18

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Tue 27-Nov-12 12:52 PM

>>>>" I think you have to realize that many come
>to this forum because they are having a problem. If everything
>is working fine, you may say nothing. So, there is a strong
>bias toward problems. >>>>>
>
>oops, this is an assumption that is totally unverified

Experience with our Forums suggests strongly that Larry's statement is correct.

Whenever we see a new camera model that displays some type of fault, we ALWAYS get more posts from those people whose camera seems to have the problem. Those who are happy with their example - and it's usually the majority - simply don't post as frequently. That's partly because seeing lots of "mine is fine" posts can be annoying to those who genuinely have an issue and want to talk about solving it.

It's only when a thread like this comes along that we see posts from satisfied owners, to provide those who have a decision to make with a more accurate overall impression of the situation

>Since then I have learned that I do have, not only a focus
>problem, but also an exposure problem.

Time will tell on that - we haven't seen enough evidence yet to be able to help you understand and diagnose what you are seeing.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

RRRoger

Monterey Bay, US
3373 posts

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#23. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 17

RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter Member
Tue 27-Nov-12 12:53 PM

>I actually loaded a CF card and took 2 images of each focus
>point (far left, far right, top and bottom). Apart from
>zooming in and checking in-store I was able to keep the images
>to check in more detail at home. I did this and was pleased
>with the results. The camera shop was more than helpful and
>fully understood my reasons for doing it, although they did
>say I was the first person who ever who had done it.
>
>Richard<<<

Although my local shop has a 30 day "no quivel" return policy,
they thanked me when I did my testing in the store.
They would much rather get the camera back the same day.
I was lucky enough to have my choice between their first D4 and D800.
I left with the D800 mostly because of the price difference but also
the D800 was lighter and fit my hand better.
It was almost 30 days before I had nearly no regrets as all as the D4 is a real picture taking machine gun.

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mmontanaro

US
11 posts

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#24. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

mmontanaro Registered since 24th Oct 2012
Tue 27-Nov-12 01:59 PM

>Ok, so I have wanted the 800 since before it came out - I
>enjoy landscapes (printed large), macro gadgets with details,
>etc etc - should be perfect for a 36MP camera!
>
>BUT... the unanswered question -purposely avoided by Nikon -
>what are the odds of having to deal with a bad instrument
>right out of the box?? Most of the posts here seem negative
>and many have multiple or seemingly unending poor results.
>
>Is there a bright side to this anywhere?? I guess I am
>HOPEFUL that the focus issue occurs in only a small fraction
>of total production and those speaking out in this forum are
>the outlying points in a statistical analysis that Nikon must
>have conducted but not made public.
>
>Please help as I can not make a purchase decision with the
>current data.
>
>Garren

The D800 is indeed an incredible camera and will be perfect for what you want to use it for. Nikon did address the issue to some degree around the Photokina show in Germany. Basically, they said they knew of the problem, what caused it, fixed it, and all new cameras manufactured after that point will NOT exhibit the focusing problem. Those previous units that do should be returned through their repair system for adjustment.

The percentage that exhibits the focusing problem is smalll and dwindling. But of course, on Internet forums and "review" sections of distributor's web sites, when people plunk down $3K for something you can hand hold, anger is high if it isn't perfect. Expectations are so high. People love their cameras. But the Internet is biased towards people who express themselves very loudly when they are not happy.

I stayed quiet- my unit works great and I'm busy out shooting images, not commenting on other's focusing problems. Sorry they have them. But if they can get past them, once the camera is fixed, I think they'll love it.

My personal opinion is to buy the camera- but make sure wherever you purchase it you have an "out" or a way to get the camera quickly and efficiently through to a repair facility. I would call and discuss with a salesperson prior to purchase to see how they're handling this (don't just blindly order online). I did see where places like B&H were testing units prior to sale, but I cannot confirm this- just read it somewhere. Call and ask.

Don't get into "paralysis by analysis." You'll never buy the camera and you'll miss so many good opportunities to be out shooting with it.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Keep clickin'!

Marlo Montanaro

http://www.marlopix.com
http://marlomontanaro.wordpress.com
http://www.facebook.com/marlopix

Dadorian

Johannesburg, ZA
83 posts

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#25. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

Dadorian Gold Member Nikonian since 17th Jul 2011
Wed 28-Nov-12 02:29 AM

No problem with mine perfect straight out of the box BUT as someone said earlier this is not as forgiving as other cameras, for example my D7000. Especially if like me you are not the most experienced photographer on the planet . I am still struggling / learning about the camera and truth be told I think it isn't bit more advanced than my own skill level warranted. Having said that, i will get there and the camera is stunning, I have had some wonderful shots and look forward to many more .my advice is buy it .

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DigitalDarrell

Knoxville, US
5987 posts

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#26. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

DigitalDarrell Team Member Founding Member of the Nikonians writer Guild. Author of most of the NikoniansPress books. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Charter Member
Sat 01-Dec-12 03:08 PM

Garren,

As long as you buy from someone that will accept immediate returns, you are protected. It is no longer difficult to find a D800/E in stock. Try Berger-Bros.com, one of our supporters.

To encourage you to make the leap, let me post a soothing Bald River Falls autumn image, taken with my D800, for your eyes. Hopefully this will help you make the right decision. The picture is what matters!

==============================================
Darrell Young (DigitalDarrell) www.pictureandpen.com
"Better too many words than not enough understanding."
==============================================

richardd300

Dyserth, UK
4507 posts

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#27. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 26

richardd300 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Apr 2009
Sat 01-Dec-12 03:59 PM | edited Sat 01-Dec-12 04:00 PM by richardd300

Great shot Darrell. The water is the correct "silkiness" for me. Great colours and dynamic range.

Richard

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The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. Einstein

Robman3

West of Santa Monica, US
1842 posts

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#28. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

Robman3 Registered since 12th Apr 2010
Sun 02-Dec-12 06:23 AM | edited Sun 02-Dec-12 03:58 PM by Robman3

Some associates, one a well known fashion shooter, had the D800 walk onto her set back in the spring, she never looked back, and stopped using the MK3. (Bought her's after the first drive by from a Nikon rep)

Another who is so finicky, he will only shoot with Zeiss primes, moved to the D800E from an older back (Kodak I think, no AA filter, could be wrong) that was his mainstay (portraits) for many years.

Another, long time Canon user, put the entire Canon array (pristine) lenses, an older back on E-bay after Thanksgiving.

He gave the brand new MK3 to his daughter which we may use in subsequent video shoots with an adapter and my Nikon glass. He's got the Sony FS700 for 4K video, and appears to be moving to the D800E for stills.

This is not a group of people who take the science lightly.

My DP friend, will borrow (mine) the D800 if he does stills shoots but brought the Sony A99 by a couple days ago, because it shoots motion using circuitry in the body, so AF (motion tracking) is blindingly fast and silent. He's a motion guy these days, as well as a long time stills person.

He does agree however, for stills, that Nikon has some engineering magic as far as DR color, plus at 36MP's in a DSLR format, there is no peer.

I guess the long story is, on average, statistically (guessing) there has been no more an issue with the D800 than the D7000 had, it's just the pace of expectations versus real time mechanical problems was amplified because of the quantum jump.

So as with most human nature, introspection, inspection, excitement, and countervailed opinion or supportive, when these warranty issues manifested Nikon managed to remedy them.

Those who were not satisfied, always had an option to return the goods.

My D800 shipped after the EL-15 backlog (I have a few spares for the D7000) has not had any issues to date, nor do the folks mentioned above.

By now (the thread is a several days old) you have made a buying decision.

As Marty tags : "Enjoy your new Nikon"

RM

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Spohr

ZA
3 posts

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#29. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

Spohr Registered since 03rd Sep 2012
Sun 02-Dec-12 11:37 AM

I was also fortunate to recieve a unit with no issues at all.
The only problem I have (especially here in the Middle-East) is having to first get rid of dust and fingerprints from furniture when shooting indoors as they stand out like a sore thumb with the D800.
Love the camera and at least the house gets cleaned more often!

mikesrc

OKLAHOMA CITY, US
299 posts

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#30. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 29

mikesrc Registered since 03rd May 2009
Sun 02-Dec-12 12:15 PM

I got mine on the day they came out I was also on a year long waiting list. Very low serial # 30015xx and It could not be a more perfect camera. In my gallery all of the flowers 2012 were taken with the D800.

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Skyco

Roanoke Island, US
171 posts

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#31. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 26

Skyco Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Mar 2012
Mon 03-Dec-12 02:20 AM | edited Mon 03-Dec-12 02:39 AM by Skyco

Beautiful photo Darrell!

I love the motion effect of the flowing water. Also, once apon-a-time (not so long ago) such a photo with this kind of dynamic range would have required HDR to get the white of the water, the color and brightness of the leaves, blue of the sky and all the contents in the shadows. Not to mention all of the minute detail in the leaves, logs and rocks.

Well Wishes,

Ken

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/skyco_g/

KnightPhoto

Alberta, CA
4954 posts

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#32. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

KnightPhoto Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2006
Thu 06-Dec-12 02:35 AM

Haven't read the thread, here is one data point for you, my October D800E appears to be fine.

<rant on>
I am getting beyond frustrated with this whole internet hysteria phenomenon. What concerns me is when people read a few threads and think they have "the problem", whether it be dust, Left-AF, you-name-it and clearly couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with their testing technique or fact gathering logic. Then they start returning 3-4 bodies and yammering on about class action law suits which only increases costs for all the rest of us. Clearly some people have had a problem, that is not my point. My point is that undisciplined speech or actions need to be reigned in. Thankfully Nikonians is a disciplined environment.
</rant off>

Just be careful out there, for example AF fine tune is a difficult thing to personally achieve and difficult topic to discuss. It can be done, but if you aren't already an experienced tuner expect a leaning curve. I AF fine tune all my cameras, but I always say its a journey, not a destination, and I always acknowledge it's a lot of work. Anyhow, I would just go ahead and get whatever camera you need and then just keep a careful eye out

Best regards, SteveK

'A camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.' -- Dorothea Lange
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Carmen Tulum

Toronto, CA
43 posts

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#33. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 32

Carmen Tulum Registered since 09th Nov 2012
Fri 07-Dec-12 12:01 AM | edited Fri 07-Dec-12 12:12 AM by Carmen Tulum

<a href="http://s1292.beta.photobucket.com/user/Carmentulum/media/_XOX1128.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/b565/Carmentulum/_XOX1128.jpg" border="0" alt="Dull rose"/></a>

Centre weighted metering. Auto focus.

I hope you can view this photo taken with my faulty D800. Mainly focus problem and exposure problem.

I see that there is a judgementalness towards Nikon owners who state in this forum that they have problems with their D800.

Please forgive the way I pasted the link to my photo example of my defective Nikon D800, returned from the workshop like this.


avet4life

US
6 posts

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#34. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 33

avet4life Registered since 05th Dec 2012
Fri 07-Dec-12 12:34 AM

from my old d800. The only problem is that it got so much detail I don't know what to do with all the detail, I would like. 24mp , but would never buy a d600

lukaswerth

Lahore, PK
574 posts

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#35. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 34

lukaswerth Registered since 24th May 2012
Sat 08-Dec-12 01:25 AM

Just for the record: I was one of those who were annoyed by the never-ending left-focus-issue. My two pence: the d800/e competes in quality with cameras like the Leica S or Pentax medium format, cameras which are, with lenses, 3-7 times as expensive. It is a complex piece of equipment, I certainly needed time to get familiar with it - still in process, in fact. There are no guaranties that there will be no production mistake, but chances are your camera will be perfect, and particularly well suited for landscape and the like.

Lukas

Trying to be a keeper of the light

gjsgarren

US
17 posts

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#36. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 35

gjsgarren Registered since 06th Mar 2011
Tue 25-Dec-12 09:52 PM

Thanks to all for your time.

I purchased a new D800 2-1/2 weeks ago.... WOW what a great camera. The first few days were spent learning the basic functions and taking trial shots (learn by doing). I feel really comfortable with this camera.

And no not a hint of any focus issues...

Now I am planning on ordering DD's book!

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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3559 posts

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#37. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 33

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Wed 26-Dec-12 01:10 AM | edited Wed 26-Dec-12 01:13 AM by km6xz

I am sorry your post did not get a reply, Carmen, there were several sub-threads in the thread.
I am afraid little can be judged from the image posted. It does not have any exif data embedded so we can't tell anything about how the image was taken. It is 1024x683 pixels so the number of pixels across the center flower is 93 pixels. Obviously this image is a small crop of a larger image, a conclusion based on how few pixels define the image and how the focus point is outside the frame. Was this flower in the center of the larger frame? The focus point info not displayed in ViewNX2 so the crop may have been to the side of a frame that was cropped out. So the center weight metering would have been of a subject not in this crop. The part of the image that is present is about 1 ev positive bias and when brought down 1 ev and sharpening added, the edges of the petal are actually pretty sharp considering how few pixels define it. The rest of the flower is blurred due to very shallow DOF. Apparently the lens was wide open and had a wide, maybe 1.4 aperture if this was a full image or it could be f/2.8 with a tiny crop, both would give about this same very thin DOF.
That is all that I can tell from this crop, can we see the original uncropped image with meta data intact. A lot more can be determined with the unmodified, uncropped file.

I am sure that this image does not prove evidence that would suggest or disprove a problem with the camera. There is just not enough information contained in the file or in the image content. Given that it did respond positively to adding sharpening is a good sign regarding the functionality of the camera.

Try a tripod shot of a subject with good contrast, in good light, using Matrix metering, AF-S, at 1/100 or faster, with the subject filling 75% of the frame and keeping the meta data intact. That would help you and us cut down on the ambiguity that so many uncontrolled variables create. It might be best to create a new thread. I am sure you will get some good advice.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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Ray Gerke

winnipeg, CA
633 posts

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#38. "RE: Percentage...." | In response to Reply # 0

Ray Gerke Registered since 12th Sep 2004
Wed 26-Dec-12 06:58 PM

My Answer to the original question is that of the 12 to 15 Nikon cameras I have owned over the last 25 years the D800 is the most outstanding of them all. It is bordering on being miraculous! It just does everything I want it to do so well! Mine is a truly amazing machine that is a joy to use in all sorts of photographic environments. (and mine was a relatively early model).

Ray Gerke

D800, D5300, D2HS, D700 (sold), D7000(sold), CP520, CP510
Nikkor 24mm f/1.4, Nikkor 50mm f/1.4, Nikkor 58mm f/1.4, Nikkor 85mm f/1.4, Nikkor 14-24 F/2.8, Nikkor 80-200 f/2.8, Nikkor 24-120VR, Nikkor Micro 60mm f/2.8, Nikkor Micro 105mm f/2.8VR, Nikkor 10.5 DX
Sigma 30mm f/1.4, Sigma 150-500mm OS

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G