Even though we ARE Nikon lovers,we are NOT affiliated with Nikon Corp. in any way.

English German French

Sign up Login
Home Forums Articles Galleries Recent Photos Contest Help Search News Workshops Shop Upgrade Membership Recommended
members
All members Wiki Contests Vouchers Apps Newsletter THE NIKONIAN™ Magazines Podcasts Fundraising

Planed Upgrade to D800

mpage

San Jose, US
351 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author
mpage Registered since 29th Jun 2004
Sun 18-Nov-12 11:02 AM | edited Sun 18-Nov-12 11:29 AM by mpage

I will be upgrading to a D800 sometime in the next few weeks. I looked closely at the D600 and the D800E, but I believe the D800 is the best choice for me. Now the only question is where to buy?

B&H has the D800 for $3,000, and it comes with a Lowepro Rezo 170 AW Camera Shoulder Bag, a SanDisk 32GB CF Memory Card Extreme 400x UDMA, and a Pearstone EN-EL15 Lithium-Ion Battery Pack (non Nikon brand).

B&H Nikon D800 package $3,000

But Adorama has a refurbished by Nikon U.S.A. D800 for $2,600.

Adorama Refurbished D800 $2,600

Cameta Camera has the refurbished D800 for $2,500

Cameta Camera Refurbished D800 $2,500

With the $400 or $500 savings I could buy a Nikon brand battery and more memory, and still have money left over to put towards a Nikon 24-70 f/2.8 lens.

In addition, a Refurbished D800 would probably avoid any possible left focus point problem.

Does anyone have any experience with refurbished Nikon products. Are they demo models or damage cameras returned to Nikon?

Both the Cameta and Adorama cameras have a one-year warranty.

Thanks,

-Mark-


hujiie

US
582 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#1. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 0

hujiie Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Apr 2009
Sun 18-Nov-12 01:08 PM

I had refurbished D300 from Adorama years ago and worked fine for 3 years before I sold. I also bought additional insurance (I believe Mack) from Adorama but it was not necessary.

Refurbished units mean any cameras that are not brand new and they can be demo models or returned or repaired cameras.

www.hitoshiujiie.com/photography.html

klrbee25

Naples, US
1386 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#2. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 0

klrbee25 Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jun 2006
Sun 18-Nov-12 01:16 PM | edited Sun 18-Nov-12 01:17 PM by klrbee25

I'd avoid D800 refurbs. Some D800s have had rocky beginnings with various small issues and you don't want to inherit them if they aren't truly fixed. For $400 more, you're getting a new camera and all those little goodies that further sweeten the deal.

-Alex Rosen
www.flickr.com/photos/klrbee25/

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

aay

CA
172 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#3. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 0

aay Registered since 11th Jul 2010
Sun 18-Nov-12 03:43 PM

I would definitely stay away from any D800 but brand new with 0 actuations on it. Believe me $400-500 savings will not be something you feel good about if your camera is affected and you have to deal with Nikon.

As for model - I would go with 800E instead of 800. There are a lot of reports saying that moire doesn't really show up unless you are in fact taking photographs of very fine textile patterns. People are saying that birds, landscapes, portraits are all very good. If you are trying to save money - then in my mind that'd be the only factor for D800.

Alex
http://www.yermakov.net

km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3559 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#4. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 0

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Mon 19-Nov-12 09:41 PM

My method of getting a D800 is the same as all my equipment, in person, trying it out and dealing with a reputable pro shop.

Nikon funneled most D800's through locally owned small shops, having learned from the D7000 high return rates of fully functioning cameras from on-line stores. As it turned out, most of the initial problems were user error or lack of understanding the fundamentals. As the same people got more experience with it, magically the camera healed itself.
Having an informed shop owner as your salesperson should short circuit some of the potential complaints. It also allowed the only opportunity for someone to suggest a more appropriate camera for the buyer if it was overkill. A great many people who bought D800's(and D7000) were upgrading from much less demanding cameras or point and shoot.

At the very least, getting it from a good pro shop would allow you to try it and verify to yourself that you are getting a correctly focusing unit.

The D800 is not a camera to get into unless one is prepared to invest significantly in the lenses and tripods that are suitable for it. If it is a strain to buy, as it would have been for me if I did not already have a collection of quality lenses, you really ought to rethink whether you are going to get the full value out of it when needing to cut corners on required accessories. A D600 is a very good alternative that would allow getting another lens suitable for it. A D7000 is the best in DX if you already have quality DX lenses.
Unless you regularly print very large, few people would see the difference between properly exposed images, viewed at normal viewing distances, from any of the current cameras.

Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

mpage

San Jose, US
351 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#5. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 3

mpage Registered since 29th Jun 2004
Tue 20-Nov-12 03:59 AM | edited Tue 20-Nov-12 05:40 AM by mpage

>As for model - I would go with 800E instead of 800. There are
>a lot of reports saying that moire doesn't really show up
>unless you are in fact taking photographs

In addition to the price, the reason I am leaning towards the D800 or the D600 is that the extra sharpness in the D800E is only evident when shooting under ideal conditions (perfect focus and perfect lighting) with the very best of lenses at the lower f/stops (f2 through f8). And at that the sharpness advantage is only noticeable at 100 percent crops on the computer or in very large prints.

Still all options are still be considered.

Thanks,

-Mark-





mpage

San Jose, US
351 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#6. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 4

mpage Registered since 29th Jun 2004
Tue 20-Nov-12 05:27 AM | edited Tue 20-Nov-12 07:02 AM by mpage

>The D800 is not a camera to get into unless one is prepared to
>invest significantly in the lenses and tripods that are
>suitable for it.

In digital cameras, I started with the D100, then the D200, and now I have a D300. I'm selling my DX equipment to defray the cost of the new camera. I sold the 17-55mm f2.8 DX lens already and still have the D300 with a Kirk L-Bracket and the Nikon 12-24 f4 DX lens to sell.

The lenses I will keep for the new full frame camera are:

Nikon 24mm f2.8 AF D
Nikon 50mm f1.4 AF G
Nikon 105mm f2.8 AF D Macro
Nikon 300mm f4 AF ED

Lenses I want to get in the future (in order) are:

Nikon 24-70mm f2.8 AF D (as soon as possible to replace the 17-55mm DX functionality)
Nikon 85mm f1.8 AF G or f1.4 AF G (huge price difference)
Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 AF G ED VR II

I want to add a Nikon wide angle to be determined later, and I'm tempted to upgrade to the Nikon 105mm f2.8 AF-S VR, but the the D is extremely sharp and it would be difficult to justify the cost (even after selling the 105mm D).

When I decide on the FX body I will get the appropriate Kirk L-Bracket.

I already have a very good tripod, the Giottos MT 8170 Carbon Fiber with the Markins M10 head, the Nodal Ninja III panoramic head, and the Manfrotto 438 Leveling Base.

I always use a tripod and cable release when possible. It helps create sharp images with no camera shake. Using a tripod forces the shooter to concentrate on composing the shot much more than when shooting hand-held. It slows things down allowing for more thought and consideration when speed is not necessary.

I do agree fully with the thrust of your comment, but I think I already have the foundation to build upon for the D600, D800, or D800E FX cameras. If one is not willing to improve upon his or her shooting technique, the added advantages of the D600 or D800 are wasted.

The huge megapixels is important, but not the most important consideration in my desire to upgrade to a new camera. The High Dynamic Range and the fast ISO range features are more important to me.

In addition, the D800 and the D600 have excellent video, although the D800 is better in this regard. But I hear that an upcoming firmware upgrade will allow the D600 to change f/stops while shooting video, as the D800 allows now.

The D300 does not have video. Video was added with the D300S, six weeks after I bought the D300.

Here are the features that I am considering between the D600 and the D800.

Considerations:

1. D600 fastest shutter speed 1/4000sec – D800 1/8000sec.
2. Flash Sync D600 1/200sec – D800 1/250sec.
3. D600 smaller and lighter - D600 weighs just 760g – D800 900g.
4. Wi-Fi - D600 can use inexpensive WU-1b transmitter for smart phone or tablet for basic camera control, live view, and photo uploads.
5. ISO range of the D600 and D800 are identical, but the lower resolution of the D600 might produce better results at higher ISO settings.
6. D600 has 39-point AF points – D800 has 51-point AF points.
7. Continuous shooting – D600 5.5 fps – D800 4 fps.
8. D800 shutters are much louder than the D600 shutters.
9. D800 has a stronger build, but D600 build is very strong too.

Other considerations:

1. D600 has USB 2 ports the D800 has USB 3 ports.
2. D800 has AF-On button on the back which separates the focus action from the shutter release – with D600 one needs to reconfigure the AE-L/AF-L button to act as an AF-On button.
3. Easy to switch between two program banks with the D600 because of the U1 and U2 positions on the command dial.
4. The video features are better on the D800.
5. People report dust on sensors or viewfinder on the D600.
6. People report left-most focus point problems on the D800.
7. Both have excellent High Dynamic Range.

Thanks,

-Mark-






mpage

San Jose, US
351 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#7. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 0

mpage Registered since 29th Jun 2004
Wed 21-Nov-12 11:39 PM | edited Wed 21-Nov-12 11:43 PM by mpage

After much consideration I decided to go with the D600. The feature set, the strong reviews, and a good price at B&H tipped the balance.

The B&H package comes with a Lowepro Rezo Shoulder Bag, a SanDisk 16 GB SDHC Memory Card Extreme Pro Class 10 UHS-I, and a Pearstone EN-EL15 Lithium-Ion Battery Pack. The $1,996 prices is good until November 24th.

The Ken Rockwell review was particularly convincing:

www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d600.htm

I'm also going to rethink getting the 24-70mm f2.8 lens. Ken Rockwell says that the 16-35mm f4 is actually sharper than the 17-35mm f2.8 or the 24-70mm f2.8.

I will need to do some research before I decide on the next lens. Here are my current lenses that will work well on the D600:

Nikon 24mm f2.8 AF D
Nikon 50mm f1.4 AF G
Nikon 105mm f2.8 AF D Macro
Nikon 300mm f4 AF ED

-Mark-











icslowmo

Surprise, US
613 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#8. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 7

icslowmo Registered since 01st Jan 2012
Thu 22-Nov-12 01:59 AM

The 16-35mm F4 and the 24-70mm F2.8 are in my opinion built for two different things. The 24-70mm F2.8 is at the moment, the sharpest mid-range zoom from Nikon. The 16-35mm F4 is said to be very good, but the 14-24mm F2.8 is said to be the sharpest wide angle zoom.

If you manly shoot landscapes and were thinking of spending the money for the 24-70mm F2.8, why not just spend a little extra for the 14-24mm F2.8... and then maybe the 24-120mm F4 VR for a walk around lens.... Or just get the D600 with the kit lens 24-85mm F3.5-4.5 VR, and the 14-24mm F2.8.

IF you do this on B&H's site, they have a 2% rewards on all of this and would equal about $90 worth of credit to buy anything else you may need.... Just my input on what else to think about....

Chris

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

mklass

Tacoma, US
7421 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#9. "RE: Planed Upgrade to D800" | In response to Reply # 0

mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006
Thu 22-Nov-12 04:14 AM

There is nothing wrong with getting a refurbished camera (or lens) provided:

1. Get it from a reputable, reliable retailer or the manufacturer.
2. Make sure it is factory refurbished, meaning by the manufacturer.
3. Make sure there is a warranty that is a reasonable length of time. 90 days is typical.
4. Make sure you can return it if not satisfied, 14 day minimum, 30 days is better.
5. Once you get the camera or lens, check it out thoroughly to be sure it functions as it should, and that it is something you that you can work with. If not, return it for an exchange or refund.

In this regard, the D800 is no different than any other camera or lens. There are known issues with some copies, which means you would know what to look for to determine if it is functioning correctly. Take those simple steps and there is no real risk to you except some inconvenience.

I have bought several refurbished Nikon bodies, lenses and speedlights, as well as 3rd party lenses. I only have had one bad experience: a lens that would not AF, bought from a manufacturer's on-line store. I returned it withing a week, and they repaired it and had it back to me in perfect working order a week later. A minor inconvenience but a significant savings over a the price of a new lens.


Mick
http://www.mickklassphoto.com
or
Visit my nikonians gallery

G