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Auto ISO and the D7000

danpass

Miami, US
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danpass Registered since 07th Dec 2006
Sun 05-Dec-10 02:57 PM

I rented a D7000 last month and was eager to use the Auto ISO function.

Then I read the dpreview concerning the D7000 and was relieved to see it wasn't me lol:

"Auto ISO function is confusing and poorly implemented (but no worse than any other Nikon DSLR)"



When I set it in the Menu and read the manual about it the whole thing seemed obvious:

Auto ISO: On
My highest ISO
The lowest shutter speed


The lowest shutter speed and the highest ISO. duh. but it didn't seem to work that way when it comes to the shutter speed as at times I was able to go below my max ss when I hadn't changed modes.

Almost like the camera had a mind of its own.

Then 'Auto', just regular Auto within the list of manually set ISO speeds, was not available (that I could tell) in anything but P mode (and green box).

Perhaps someone can provide some clarification?


thanks

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RRRoger

Monterey Bay, US
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#1. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 0

RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter Member
Sun 05-Dec-10 03:16 PM | edited Sun 05-Dec-10 03:29 PM by RRRoger

Look again.
There are 4 settings
ISO sensitivity is the top one that I first overlooked.


My settings:
ISO sensitivity = 100
Auto ISO = ON
MAX sensitivity = 6400
Minimum shutter speed = 1/500

I use Aperture Priority

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danpass

Miami, US
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#2. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 1

danpass Registered since 07th Dec 2006
Sun 05-Dec-10 03:22 PM

But it's one or the other.

Straight ISO setting (with Auto apparently only available in P mode)

OR

Auto ISO (On or Off with the varying conditions)

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agitater

Toronto, CA
4551 posts

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#3. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 0

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Sun 05-Dec-10 03:57 PM | edited Sun 05-Dec-10 04:02 PM by agitater

The D7000 user manual is quite explicit in its explanation of Auto ISO and how it works. Apparently, the wise heads at DPReview don't even bother looking at the manual before criticizing a highly useful feature?

End users demand ever more complex features. So do reviewers. Then the reviewers complain that the features are not fully intuitively usable? This is foolishness, IMO, and DPReview should be ashamed of itself.

Auto ISO works like this:

Set the lowest shutter speed at which you're willing to shoot before ISO begins to automatically ramp up. Then set the ISO beyond which you don't want the camera to go (e.g., to avoid excessive noise). Then note that if the lighting conditions in which you make a shot are so dark that your preset ISO limit is insufficient for a usable exposure, the camera will still drop the shutter speed lower than your setting in order to get that usable exposure.

You still control Aperture and eV of course.

Once again, the shutter speed you select in the Auto ISO settings is only the trigger for ISO to start increasing. It does not mean that the camera won't slow the shutter even more if needed.

Don't confuse Shutter Priority shooting mode, with which you can lock the shutter at a certain speed (which may be what you should be using sometimes in conjunction with the settings in Auto ISO) with the shutter setting in Auto ISO - they're two different things. For example, if you never want to shoot slower than, say, 1/80s, then switch to Shutter Priority shooting mode and set that speed. If you then set the same shutter speed (or higher if you like) in the Auto ISO menu, the camera CPU will alter both aperture and ISO in order to get a shot in lighting conditions which demand more than the maximum ISO setting alone.

A complex explanation for a versatile and complex feature. DPReview is starting to irritate me. When Phil was running the joint alone, things were much better. The company's latest moves are, I think, a mistake.

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Ray S

US
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#4. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 2

Ray S Registered since 30th Oct 2010
Sun 05-Dec-10 04:30 PM

One thing I noticed about shooting with Auto ISO is that it tends to raise the ISO really high when you do flash photography, frequently using the highest limit (default of 6400). I think the feqture works as you would hope except for that, but I don't like that functionality.

briantilley

Paignton, UK
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#5. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 2

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Sun 05-Dec-10 04:32 PM

>Straight ISO setting (with Auto apparently only available in P mode)

Auto ISO is available in all four modes - P, S, A and even M

Howard has explained below how it works. I would just emphasise (in case it isn't obvious) that Auto ISO always starts at the value you have previously selected, and gets adjusted (up or down) from there).

I've found this to be an extremely useful feature of recent Nikon DSLR's, once you understand how it is implemented. The DPR reviewer apparently didn't take the trouble to do that

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

jpFoto

US
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#6. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 4

jpFoto Registered since 25th Jun 2010
Sun 05-Dec-10 06:12 PM | edited Sun 05-Dec-10 07:52 PM by jpFoto

I don't have the D7000, but I do have a D3100 and have the same problem with flash and Auto ISO. I think that it's a firmware problem since I do not have that problem with my D700. I've tried it with both the built in flashes and with my SB900. With the D3100 and the built-in flash, and my preferred ISO at 100, the camera raised the ISO to 3200 for a shot of a clock on a wall six feet away in a room with daylight coming in thru numerous windows. The D700 raised the ISO to 250 for the same shot. Both cameras took the shot at 1/60 at f8. Granted, there may be a difference in power rating, but 3200? Without the flash, the D3100 took the shot in Aperture priority at 1/8 at f8, also raising the ISO to 3200. The D700 had the same results without the flash.

Until there's a firmware fix, I will make it a point to turn off Auto ISO when using flash (if I remember.)

Correction: I'm not sure that I have the same problem with the SB900. After a few more test shots, I only see a one stop difference in the ISO and this could be attributable to differences in the camera formats and my unscientific test methods, and, of course, the D700 could be wrong.

Update: I changed my Auto ISO settings to let it float to High 2 (12,800). I took the same photo and the ISO did, in fact, float to High 2. I think that there is definitely a firmware problem with the D3100, and I would be curious if some D7000 users have noticed, or would check to see if they get, similar results.

danpass

Miami, US
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#7. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 5

danpass Registered since 07th Dec 2006
Sun 05-Dec-10 06:21 PM | edited Sun 29-May-11 01:27 PM by briantilley

It's grayed out within Choice 1 (Choice 2 is the multi-field item)

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danpass

Miami, US
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#8. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 3

danpass Registered since 07th Dec 2006
Sun 05-Dec-10 06:22 PM | edited Sun 29-May-11 01:26 PM by briantilley


Good stuff, thanks.

I was wondering if it was a lower limit or a trigger of sorts. I was getting seemingly conflicting results when using the system.

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agitater

Toronto, CA
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#9. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 8

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Sun 05-Dec-10 07:21 PM

>I was wondering if it was a lower limit or a trigger of sorts.
>I was getting seemingly conflicting results when using the
>system.

The user interface - the configuration choices in the Auto ISO menu - are somewhat counterintuitive mainly because it seems logical for anyone to think that the trigger shutter speed in the Auto ISO menu is going to prevent your shutter from ever firing any slower. A text note should be added to the user interface which briefly explains that, "If camera is in P or A shooting mode, exposure requirements may automatically drop shutter speed below the level set in the Auto ISO menu."

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RobCD

US
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#10. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 9

RobCD Registered since 10th Nov 2010
Sun 05-Dec-10 08:17 PM

That would be helpful to those just learning the feature. I still can't think of any other choice you could expect the camera to make though. If you are shooting in A mode then the only logical choice to get the correct exposure is to lower shutter speed IMO. It is not a fixed shutter speed but rather it is the min shutter speed before AutoISO kicks in. Something has to give if your max ISO, min shutter speed, and fixed aperture settings don't allow for correct exposure.

I think the D90 AutoISO operates the same way so I'm not sure why a reviewer would not already understand the feature. Admittedly I'm not familiar with other DSLR AutoISO features so there may be a better way. I do have the Canon G12 and the AutoISO implementation isn't nearly as versatile as my D90.

briantilley

Paignton, UK
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#11. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 7

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Sun 05-Dec-10 09:01 PM

>It's grayed out within Choice 1
>(Choice 2 is the multi-field item)

I'm afraid I'm not sure what you are getting at.

By "Choice 1" and "Choice 2", are you referring to the User Settings U1 and U2 Modes? If so, then these will contain whatever values - for items in the Shooting Menu (including Auto ISO), Custom Settings Menu and other options - you have previously saved.

To reiterate - Auto ISO is available in P, S, A and M Modes.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

greenwing

Yorkshire, UK
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#12. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 6

greenwing Registered since 18th May 2006
Sun 05-Dec-10 09:23 PM | edited Sun 29-May-11 01:26 PM by briantilley

This seems to be a deliberate change in Auto ISO behaviour since (about) the D300s. Previously, an ISO would be selected such that the ambient & flash combined to give a good exposure. Later cameras select an ISO based on the ambient exposure only. I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for a firmware fix.

Chris

jpFoto

US
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#13. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 12

jpFoto Registered since 25th Jun 2010
Sun 05-Dec-10 09:49 PM

Interesting. Thanks for the reply.

danpass

Miami, US
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#14. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 11

danpass Registered since 07th Dec 2006
Sun 05-Dec-10 10:30 PM | edited Sun 05-Dec-10 10:52 PM by danpass

>>It's grayed out within Choice 1
>>(Choice 2 is the multi-field item)
>
>I'm afraid I'm not sure what you are getting at.
>
>By "Choice 1" and "Choice 2", are you
>referring to the User Settings U1 and U2 Modes? If so, then
>these will contain whatever values - for items in the Shooting
>Menu (including Auto ISO), Custom Settings Menu and other
>options - you have previously saved.
>
>To reiterate - Auto ISO is available in P, S, A and M Modes.


Menu button
Shooting Menu
ISO sensitivity settings
->Choice 1: ISO sensitivity
->Choice 2: Auto ISO sensitivity control


edit: I noticed in another thread that you don't have a D7000. I don't know how different the implementation is from other models.

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danpass

Miami, US
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#15. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 9

danpass Registered since 07th Dec 2006
Sun 05-Dec-10 10:36 PM | edited Sun 29-May-11 01:27 PM by briantilley


As a follow up question; if the shutter speed doesn't meet the trigger point does it use the ISO setting selected in Choice 1?

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RobCD

US
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#16. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 15

RobCD Registered since 10th Nov 2010
Mon 06-Dec-10 12:53 AM

Yes, if you are able to get the correct exposure with the selected aperture along with your minimum shutter speed (or above) then it will use your ISO Sensitivity set in Choice 1. If that's not enough then it will increase ISO as necessary until it hits your max ISO. Only then will it go below your minimum shutter speed.

briantilley

Paignton, UK
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#17. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 14

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Mon 06-Dec-10 07:19 AM

Thank you for clarifying what you meant. I'm sorry if bringing U1 and U2 into it has confused things.

Anyway, I'm going by the D7000 manual, which I have downloaded in PDF format.

The implementation of Auto ISO is the same as other Nikons like the D300 and D700 which I use. It is available in P, S, A and M Modes, not just P mode as you originally stated.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

briantilley

Paignton, UK
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#18. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 15

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Mon 06-Dec-10 07:21 AM

Yes, it does - as I pointed out in reply #5 above

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

rbsandor

Denver, US
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#19. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 0

rbsandor Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Aug 2007
Mon 06-Dec-10 05:09 PM

An option the OP might want to consider is to shoot in camera Manual with Auto ISO active. In this fashion, A and S are set (and are now fixed) to achieve the desired results and ISO becomes the sole variable. Also in this setup, if you use the exposure compensation button to vary the exposure, it is ISO which is changed. I have found it to work well in challenging conditions.

gtrussell

CA
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#20. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 9

gtrussell Registered since 12th Apr 2011
Wed 27-Apr-11 05:51 PM

It is my experience now with a D7000 and the AF-S f1.4 50mm lens that if I have the dial set at "P" and Auto ISO set at 400-6400 shutter 1/100, that the P does not seem to work like my previous camera, a D200. The P setting is supposed to allow you to choose a set of equivalent expose settings by rotating the main dial. However, *all* the choices are at f1.4. I am shooting pictures of a band in a bar, with weird spot lights, but I can not get P mode to choose anything except f1.4 unless I either turn off Auto ISO or set it to min=max=6400. If I use AutoISO min=max=6400, and min shutter speed of 1/60, then the P mode chooses modes with different shutter speeds and f stops.

This did not happen with my old D200, but perhaps as the max ISO of the D200 Auto was 1600, I avoided the problem.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

regards, Tom

greenwing

Yorkshire, UK
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#21. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 20

greenwing Registered since 18th May 2006
Sun 29-May-11 01:35 PM

Tom, program shift can only choose a smaller aperture if it can set a slower shutter speed at the ISO you have manually selected, and I guess that in the situation you describe that is not possible.

Chris

km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
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#22. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 19

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Sun 29-May-11 03:48 PM

DPR assigned a reviewer to the D7000 who is only familiar with Canon. He remarked when questioned on his claim, that he thought it was unfair to expect him to read the manual before passing judgement the Nikon system, it was obviously wrong since it did not react how a Canon would. He later admitted when confronted that he deducted points for not being identical to Canon and claimed that any modern camera brand should be the same as Canon.

If you want to get the most from your Nikon gear, do not pay attention to DPR, they generate a lot of confusion and mythology. Recent reviews have shown a distinct bias against Nikon, probably due to lower ad buys than Canon, or a higher margin for their owner, Amazon.
Remember, they are the ones who pushed the ill-conceived technique of "fixing" D90 AF problems....or claims that they all back focused or front focused, so advised people to mess with the mirror pivot hex head screw in the mirror box. That caused a lot of people grief and repair bills to calibrate it again. They also pushed the notion that testing a D7000 sensor required shooting a 5 minute video at highest ISO with the lens cap on. Tens of thousands were returned when it showed a growing number of hot spots(not stuck pixels, they were normal noise build up as the sensor heated up with a long video. At normal ISO, and without the cap on, the problem was unnoticeable. At high ISO, it was about the same as any other camera that can reach high gains.
Either they were trying to undermine Nikon with a non-issue or they are incompetent. Either one does not serve you well if you want information about Nikon's. Come to the source, Nikonians.

Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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J_Harris

US
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#23. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 22

J_Harris Silver Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Awarded for his contribution to the Nikonians Articles section Nikonian since 29th Mar 2011
Sun 29-May-11 07:09 PM | edited Sun 29-May-11 07:18 PM by J_Harris


Interesting information about DPR. I have been told they are/were the "gold standard" for technical information and reviews. However, I also compare their reviews to Thom Hogan, Ken rockwell , and others to get the full picture.

The reason I became a member of Nikonian is because you get information from the actual users, who have the experience and knowledge I can only dream about.

It's unfortunate, but it looks like financial gain may be influencing DPRs objectivity.

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agitater

Toronto, CA
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#24. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 23

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Sun 29-May-11 09:03 PM | edited Mon 30-May-11 08:33 AM by agitater

>It's unfortunate, but it looks like financial gain may be
>influencing DPRs objectivity.

I think Stan's assessment (and his recounting of the Canon comparison issue) is dead on. But I think these sorts of problems result from a failure (or lack) of editorial supervision. When writers/reviewers aren't checked by an experienced editor, when writers/reviewers aren't vetted to eliminate obvious bias, when editorial policy is not clearly elucidated, and when obvious factual errors contained in reviews are not properly corrected (merely quietly amended later rather than broadcast or featured), DPR becomes less a reliable publication than just another busy blog and forum site.

Tech journalism was co-opted by advertising interests many years ago. Whatever objective agendas and policies existed in a few print publications (by no means the majority of them), died alongside the demise of print editions. Popular Photography is a great example of a mag that has always tested bodies and lenses quite rigorously (and despite arguments about its test methods - all methodologies contain flaws - at least PopPhoto tested in a consistent manner), but yet always found a way to enthusiastically trumpet almost every body and lens except for those real turkeys made by companies that would never be big advertisers in any event.

I've received so many complaints and counteractions from product makers (software and hardware) because of the "Cons" sections in my own reviews that I'm under no delusions about the relationship between difficulty getting review copies/models/items and a past review containing one too many Cons. This despite my transparent efforts to always keep my reviews as upbeat as possible. DPR, by contrast, has a much larger audience for its reviews and can level criticism (and does so) when it's appropriate. The problem is the basis for such criticism, and that's where a tough senior editor should be eliminating obvious bias in order to avoid obscuring practical review documentation and testing results.

Sites such as Nikonians may truly become the last bastions of collective objectivity when it comes to product assessments.

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Howard Carson

briantilley

Paignton, UK
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#25. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 24

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Mon 30-May-11 06:25 AM

>Sites such as Nikonians may truly become the last bastions of
>collective objectivity when it comes to product assessments.


Well said, Howard

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

Leonard62

Pa, US
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#26. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 22

Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Writer Ribbon awarded for his contributions to the Nikonians Resources articles library Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009
Mon 30-May-11 11:39 AM

>DPR assigned a reviewer to the D7000 who is only familiar
>with Canon. He remarked when questioned on his claim, that he
>thought it was unfair to expect him to read the manual before
>passing judgement the Nikon system, it was obviously wrong
>since it did not react how a Canon would. He later admitted
>when confronted that he deducted points for not being
>identical to Canon and claimed that any modern camera brand
>should be the same as Canon.
>
It is unbelievable that a reviewer for DPR or any other highly read review site would be so biased or ignorant or inexperienced. Goodbye DPR.

Len

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agitater

Toronto, CA
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#27. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 26

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Mon 30-May-11 07:55 PM


>It is unbelievable that a reviewer for DPR or any other highly
>read review site would be so biased or ignorant or
>inexperienced. Goodbye DPR.

Well you're right Len, IMO. In DPR's defense though, it offers quite a few other benefits, and many of its reviews are dead-on accurate. Keep in mind too that DPR sung the praises of the D700, D3, D70 (years ago) and other Nikon bodies. One (inept) reviewer doesn't represent everything DPR does.

I don't personally think that DPR offers anything even vaguely close to the dedicated sorts of photography and Nikon product support found at Nikonians. I don't think DPR could ever compete with Nikonians that way, so here I stay and only occasionally visit DPR.

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Leonard62

Pa, US
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#28. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 27

Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Writer Ribbon awarded for his contributions to the Nikonians Resources articles library Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009
Mon 30-May-11 08:28 PM | edited Mon 30-May-11 08:30 PM by Leonard62

In DPR's defense though, it offers
>quite a few other benefits, and many of its reviews are
>dead-on accurate.

Yes, you're right Howard. The review really didn't bother me much because I never read the complete reviews and skip around. There are very many features I don't really use at all. I never use auto ISO, only shoot in aperture priority, I never found a need to bracket my shots or to rapid shoot sports with large bursts. I got along just fine for over 30 years with film bodies that didn't have those features. My interests are in picture quality, color accuracy, build quality, lens variety and compatabilty and ease of use. I do use Canon for one lens only but I really don't like Canon bodies. I don't understand why they don't work like my Nikons.

Len

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agitater

Toronto, CA
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#29. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 28

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Mon 30-May-11 08:46 PM


>There are very many features I don't really use at
>all. I never use auto ISO, only shoot in aperture priority, I
>never found a need to bracket my shots or to rapid shoot
>sports with large bursts. I got along just fine for over 30
>years with film bodies that didn't have those features. My
>interests are in picture quality, color accuracy, build
>quality, lens variety and compatabilty and ease of use. I do
>use Canon for one lens only but I really don't like Canon
>bodies. I don't understand why they don't work like my Nikons.

Len - you're the guy that keeps Nikon, Canon and all the rest of the makers awake each night worrying themselves sick. You can't be distracted from just making photos. The bells & whistles and feature bloat are inconsequential to you. I'm glad you mentioned it and I agree. So many of the touted new features, when active and properly configured, can actually get in the way of making a good, quick photo.

I think we can acknowledge that Canon's design, form factor and configuration settings are intuitively usable by an enormous number of photographers. My younger son (he's 24 now) has used Canon gear for many years and finds my Nikon gear awkward to hold and use. He chose Canon years ago because he thought it was the most intuitively useful gear and because the form factor fits his hand like a tailored glove.

By contrast, I personally find that most Canon lenses and digital SLR bodies just feel wrong to me. Can't get used to them. Makes it difficult to do objective product testing too.

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Howard Carson

RRRoger

Monterey Bay, US
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#30. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 29

RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter Member
Mon 30-May-11 09:40 PM

Thank God that Canon and Nikon are as different as they are.
Some people are naturally left handed, all hands are different in some way, and everyone thinks differently.
These two and other brands give users a choice.
And the competition is good for all.

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agitater

Toronto, CA
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#31. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 30

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Mon 30-May-11 11:09 PM


>And the competition is good for all.

Not really IMO. Feature bloat, megapixel wars, massive complexity, ever higher prices, limited availability because makers stretch their competitiveness across too many model lines/SKUs, and shareholder profit/margin/dividend demands amidst all of it constitutes an unsustainable economic model.

I think the great myth is that an absence of competition breeds laziness - or at least what the proponents of competition-driven marketplaces refer to as slow/long development and product cycles. But marketplace competition has never given us anything except consumer/retail-driven economies.

Intensely competitive marketplaces drive makers to bring products to market before the products are truly ready.

I think that in a less intensely competitive marketplace the D700 class of camera would have shown up at the same time several years ago - perhaps earlier. I think the D50, D60 and D200 (among other bodies) would never have seen the light of day, and we'd be none the worse for it.

I'm thinking this is the wrong forum for this sort of post. I'll stop.

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Vlad_IT

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#32. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 24

Vlad_IT Silver Member Nikonian since 21st Sep 2011
Mon 24-Oct-11 11:46 AM | edited Mon 24-Oct-11 04:22 PM by Vlad_IT

>
>>And the competition is good for all.
>
>Not really IMO. Feature bloat, megapixel wars, massive
>complexity, ever higher prices, limited availability because
>makers stretch their competitiveness across too many model
>lines/SKUs, and shareholder profit/margin/dividend demands
>amidst all of it constitutes an unsustainable economic model.
>
>
>I think the great myth is that an absence of competition
>breeds laziness - or at least what the proponents of
>competition-driven marketplaces refer to as slow/long
>development and product cycles. But marketplace competition
>has never given us anything except consumer/retail-driven
>economies.
>
>Intensely competitive marketplaces drive makers to bring
>products to market before the products are truly ready.
>
>I'm thinking this is the wrong forum for this sort of post.
>I'll stop.
>

Howard,

1. I can agree with you on most. But IMHO without competition we would get another Microsoft.

2. There are always beginners, intermediate, advances users and professionals. Nobody can please all. But let's keep separate last two categories, who most of the time know what they are doing and what they want. If you take a look there is a very small niche for each category – Nikon and Canon offer one or two bodies to choose from and maybe one crossover body. If we would not had Nikon and Canon competition - i doubt we would have a chance to see $1200 D7000 camera - it would be D5000 and D700 (or D5100 and D800, whatever). Look at Pentax, Minolta or even Leica…

Without competition we would only have “Windows Millennium” or “Vista” and would be happy. Back in Sovet Union i had to choose between Wedding suite and Semi-pro Kiev-17 camera (it's hard to explain, but i was saving a whole year in order to get one more or less decent item).


Respectfully,
Vlad

Vlad_IT

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#33. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 31

Vlad_IT Silver Member Nikonian since 21st Sep 2011
Mon 24-Oct-11 11:53 AM | edited Mon 24-Oct-11 12:14 PM by Vlad_IT

Howard,

I think if Nikon would afraid for its reputation (and they are, obviously, NOT), they should assign a group of people – let’s say free-lancers, to monitor daily publication on 20? (top 30) popular websites, or, maybe, Nikon can just offer to users some sort of incentives for each lead to a “professional” review that is bias and let Nikon Employee to challenge the review. Incentives can be as simple as Additional Nikon manual, or a Nikon filter, or something similar for let’s say 10 valids leads…. It can be thought through. (good example are cigurets points program, those were very popular and piople were just looking for an empty box with UPC code

As per my personal experience with electronics - I got used to be prepared to read a lot of negative reviews even for an excellent product. My “workflow”, when I’m choosing a new toy, is pretty much like this:

1. I pick few items that bring a lot of attention (a good example here is my D7000 - it’s my first dSLR. For the past 8 years I used Canon P&S cameras. I was extremely happy with my Nikon N90s and I was extremely happy with PowerShot(s) SD400, SD500, SD750 and G9. So naturally I picked 7D and D7000 as my potential targets.

2. My second requirement is the potential item should have a lot of reviews with at least 4 out of 5 average rating.

3. I do not buy anything that just put out on the market, unless I’m forced to. I usually let the first wave of excitement to settle in and SW/FW to be updated/bugs fixed, “first-impression” reviews to be updated, etc…

4. Next, I read all and every single negative reviews and divide all those in two categories: people who know what they are talking about (or potential possibility of that) and people just producing hot air(for various reasons).

5. Last and not least I decide for myself if features (lack of features) described in potentially valid negative reviews are important to me as to user. If they are not – I’m done with my choice and I’m making a purchase. If negatively described features are important to me – then I do additional research just on those features and making my final decision.

This is the way I ended up back with Nikon, and Oh Boy, I’m ONE HAPPY CAMPER now!

Best regards,
Vlad

agitater

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#34. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 33

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Mon 24-Oct-11 11:33 PM

Lots of good points in your post. I'd only add that Nikon, like most other major manufacturers, maintains a Brand Guardian position or department of some sort which employees a small team of people who are tasked with monitoring how the Nikon brand is being used externally, and who also review various print publications and web sites/blogs and so on which comment on Nikon products. Many major retailers do the same thing. Whether or not such teams for various companies are large enough to actually cover all areas of concern is another matter. They rarely meddle in anything online or in print, but rather advise the corporate legal department about various issues extant.

I think the worst thing a company can do, unless there are extremely important factual inaccuracies in an op/ed or review or news article about its products, is to participate in a discussion thread in order to correct some perceptible inaccuracy. Any such participation is a very good way for the Nikon employee to get eaten alive in some forums. There are forum sharks out there who fully realize that a so-called brand guardian or product evangelist is limited in the degree to and manner in which which he or she can respond if a thread becomes heated. The forum sharks of course have no such strictures and will proceed to eviscerate the brand employee without mercy. The issues may end up ranging very far indeed from the original point, but that makes absolutely no difference to a bunch of trolls and sharks who smell blood in the water. For a brand employee in that situation it's tantamount to ritual suicide.

Several years ago, my research company was approached by a rather prominent brand about just such a prospect - brand guardian and product evangelist participation in online discussion boards/forums specifically to correct misinformation. The test that my business partner and I presented online for the edification of the brand owners was enough to scare them all into about a week of nightmares. On that basis they elected to follow our advice and stay well away from surreptitious guerilla marketing (i.e., fake forums posts), online product evangelism in discussion boards/forums, and anything other than absolutely transparent guerilla marketing. They're happy they did so. A competitor of the company shortly thereafter decided to battle the current and ended up embarrassing itself.

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J_Harris

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#35. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 34

J_Harris Silver Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Awarded for his contribution to the Nikonians Articles section Nikonian since 29th Mar 2011
Tue 25-Oct-11 12:33 AM

Interesting information.

The current and future online environment as you describe doesn't bode well for those of us who are looking for civil and informative answers and discussions.

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#36. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 34

Vlad_IT Silver Member Nikonian since 21st Sep 2011
Tue 25-Oct-11 12:43 AM | edited Tue 25-Oct-11 08:52 AM by Vlad_IT

Howard,

i hear you. But nothing is perfect in this (or any other) life, and we all trying to adapt to the environment assign to us by few...


Best regards,
Vlad

agitater

Toronto, CA
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#37. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 35

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Tue 25-Oct-11 01:36 AM

>Interesting information.
>
>The current and future online environment as you describe
>doesn't bode well for those of us who are looking for civil
>and informative answers and discussions.

I can understand your trepidation, but Nikonians and sites like it remain a bulwark against the non-membership/free sites. The web is a morass of inequity, iniquity and worse all stirred in amongst the good stuff. Sorting it out can be a full time job. As ever, free equates with, well, free. You get what you pay for. Pay nothing, get nothing. Of course there are any number of freely accessible forums through which we can obtain (and sometime contribute) great information. Go find 'em if you have the time. But the longer we continue online, the greater the chances that co-opted site owners will allow the sort of guerrilla marketing so widely practiced these days. That may only mean that Nikonians and sites like it end up being an even better value for the membership fee.

Nikonians (members) are harder and more realistically critical about old, new and predicted Nikon gear than any other group online or in print today. The benefit is a well-aggregated collection of hard data and extensive user experience on which to begin basing both creative decisions and equipment purchasing decisions. Again, you get what you pay for.

If much of what some other (free) sites do is designed to generate as much traffic as possible in order to help generate AdSense, affiliate/super affiliate and paid ad revenue, and if such sites exist often absent any professional editorial controls, what on earth can be expected from those sites besides traffic-generating controversy, uncontrolled forums, blatant product favoritism and so on? Of course there are exceptions, but it's too often true that finding the exceptions within such sites and finding exceptional free sites to begin with is way too much like hard work.

Once again, Nikoinians to the rescue I think. Nikonians is far from perfect we know, but it's a safe bet for creative stimulus, technical advice and equipment advice. It's about what we both receive and have a chance to contribute in return for our membership fees.

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agitater

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#38. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 36

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Tue 25-Oct-11 01:37 AM


>i hear you. But nothing is perfect in this (or any other)
>life, and we all trying to adopt to the environment assign to
>us by few...

Absolutely.

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kstrongs

St. Thomas, CA
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#39. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 0

kstrongs Registered since 04th Oct 2011
Sat 29-Oct-11 09:41 PM

I have found the Auto ISO function on my D7000 to be very usefull.
Set on M.
Set F2.8 aperature (70-200mm F2.8 VR1)
Set 1/400 shutter speed
Auto ISO On
1/400 min
200 low
3200 high
I am shooting hockey, through the glass. Arenas have crappy light. Getting great shots as the ISO adjusts up and down, not my Aperature or Shutter.
45Mps Sandisk Pro, 14 Bit Raw.

Winterfell

Roseville, US
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#40. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 39

Winterfell Silver Member Nikonian since 21st Mar 2009
Tue 01-Nov-11 11:01 PM

One thing to keep in mind when using the Auto ISO: The minium shutter speed stays the same unless you change it. Which can lead to some strange results when you switch from your 35mm lens to 300mm lens, etc...

The DPReview review, for all it's laziness did have a point, that having Minimum Shutter Speed presets per lens, or Minimum Shutter Speed that adapts to the focal length you're using would be helpful*. I don't think Canon does this either, yet.


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kstrongs

St. Thomas, CA
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#41. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 0

kstrongs Registered since 04th Oct 2011
Fri 04-Nov-11 01:22 PM | edited Fri 04-Nov-11 11:12 PM by kstrongs

After reading the various posts I ask, is not this Subject supposed to be about Auto ISO and the D7000? Why all the marketing talk? It is interesting but I do not see the relevance. Sorry, I am new here. I have been thinking about upgrading, then I could post some shots.

I found Manual mode can be the best for using Auto ISO, when shooting various light conditions. I think the folks who photograph birds would like to be able to set a fast shutter, wide aperature, and not worry about the constant change in light, might be easier to catch a bird in flight. Any thoughts?

bclaff

Vancouver (WA USA not BC Canad, US
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#42. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 41

bclaff Awarded for multiple contributions for the Resources Registered since 25th Oct 2004
Sat 05-Nov-11 03:30 AM

Ken,

Yes, I find ISO Auto used with Manual mode a great wildlife combination.


Bill

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kstrongs

St. Thomas, CA
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#43. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 42

kstrongs Registered since 04th Oct 2011
Sun 06-Nov-11 02:28 AM

>Ken,
>
>Yes, I find ISO Auto used with Manual mode a great wildlife
>combination.
>
>
>Bill
>
Thanks Bill.
I shot my sons hockey game tonight. Major Midget. Through the slightly dirty glass. I can add Hockey to the list of things the Auto ISO on D7000 has helped. By keeping the Aperature at F2.8 to F3.2, the glass is out of the depth of field. Cleans up pretty good with NX2. Hockey, like wildlife, can be fast, the subject does not like to stay still very long. Light is constanly changing and with the high ISO on the D7000, we can get a great shot with minimal light, use faster shutter speed therefore reducing blur, and capture a nice bokey with the aperature selected..

wmmc

Flanders, US
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#44. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 43

wmmc Gold Member Nikonian since 09th May 2009
Wed 09-Nov-11 11:04 AM

I'm really glad I read to the bottom of this post. While I have used Auto Iso for my D70, then D90, and now D7000, I had never thought of using it in Manual mode. I love shooting dance which is usally poor lighting and fast action - I have done well with this in S, but next I will try M.

By the way - Love Nikonians! Lost interest in DPR because of the fairly frequent abuse some of the members would dole out to those asking simple, naive (some would say "stupid") questions.

Thanks for maintaining a forum with a sense of Values.

Bill

Bill

JohnE Nikon

New HArtford, US
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#45. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 44

JohnE Nikon Registered since 15th Jun 2010
Wed 09-Nov-11 06:25 PM | edited Wed 09-Nov-11 06:26 PM by JohnE Nikon

I have read through most of this post. I don't use auto iso and flash for the reasons described. Does anyone?

Does anyone think there is a problem with the way the newer Nikon's handle auto-iso and flash?

BTW when in green auto mode the iso does not kick up to 6400 but usually around 800 from my recollection.

When I use a flash indoors, I either shoot in manual or AE priority and manually set an iso usually between 400-1200 depending on lighting and how much background I want to include.
I am quite happy with this camera but do feel like auto-iso and flash do not work well together and hence don't use it.

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greenwing

Yorkshire, UK
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#46. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 45

greenwing Registered since 18th May 2006
Wed 09-Nov-11 07:29 PM

>Does anyone think there is a problem with the way the newer
>Nikon's handle auto-iso and flash?

There's certainly a difference in the workings of Auto-ISO and flash between the cameras before the D300s, and the D300s and later bodies. It's arguably more like the way Aperture priority and Shutter priority work than the previous implementaion was. As shutter priority opens up the aperture regardless of the fact that there will be flash, and Aperture priority lowers the shutter speed down to the 'flash shutter speed' you've set, so Auto-ISO raises the ISO towards the max ISO that you've set. It's arguably more like the other semi auto modes, but that's not to say I like it. I thought the previous system worked well and gave better results by keeping the ISO down.

Chris

briantilley

Paignton, UK
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#47. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 45

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Wed 09-Nov-11 07:56 PM

>Does anyone think there is a problem with the way the newer
>Nikon's handle auto-iso and flash?

I don't see it as any worse - just slightly different from earlier Nikons.

>BTW when in green auto mode the iso does not kick up to 6400
>but usually around 800 from my recollection.

The camera will bump up the ISO to the maximum you have specified if it needs to, but in AUTO mode (like Program), it is likely to adjust the aperture first.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

JohnE Nikon

New HArtford, US
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#48. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 46

JohnE Nikon Registered since 15th Jun 2010
Thu 10-Nov-11 02:49 PM

Thanks Chris. Nice analogy.

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dbvisions

Ringgold, US
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#49. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 45

dbvisions Silver Member Nikonian since 25th Jan 2011
Thu 10-Nov-11 03:22 PM

After stumbling on this while shooting a few months ago I contacted Nikon support to ask about it. I really thought that it was a bug in the camera operating system. Most often, I shoot in Aperture Priority using available light. I had assumed that Auto ISO would be further down the chain of automatic adjustments in getting proper exposure if I had my flash active - but not so. Auto ISO jacks the ISO up to the max setting in an attempt to get the exposure correct and then the flash will still fire. This is not what I wanted at all. Nikon support said that the camera was acting properly. So, I learned to set the ISO manually whenever I want to use flash - which is not very often.

I am very happy with my D7000's low-light performance and use Auto ISO much of the time. My wife and I shoot horse shows in covered or indoor arenas. Shutter speeds have to be fast enough to capture the action. Flash is not allowed so higher ISO settings are needed. It is possible for me to use Auto ISO with a max usually set at 3200 and expect to get good, properly-exposed, and usable action shots. This is great!

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New HArtford, US
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#50. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 47

JohnE Nikon Registered since 15th Jun 2010
Thu 10-Nov-11 04:19 PM

Brian,

Do you ever use auto iso with flash?

JohnE Nikon
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briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

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#51. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 50

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Thu 10-Nov-11 04:25 PM

When I'm doing "studio-type" work using Speedlights, I'm usually in Manual mode on the camera (and the Speedlights), with Auto ISO turned off.

I do occasionally use Program mode with flash for events, and usually turn Auto ISO off then as well. The exception is when I need to change rapidly from flash to non-flash shooting.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

JohnE Nikon

New HArtford, US
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#52. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 51

JohnE Nikon Registered since 15th Jun 2010
Thu 10-Nov-11 05:07 PM

Thanks Brian

> The exception is when
>I need to change rapidly from flash to non-flash shooting.

Your exception is where I think I have been dissapointed in the past. When not using flash indoors I am fairly happy with images up to iso 6400 and sometimes even higher, but when I want flash on I would rather not have such high iso's. Now instead of just popping up my flash and shooting, I will use a user defined setting with auto iso on for non-flash work indoors and an aperture priority setting or manual for flash work where iso is set manually. It is quick to turn the dial and no big deal.

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kstrongs

St. Thomas, CA
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#53. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 44

kstrongs Registered since 04th Oct 2011
Sat 12-Nov-11 12:16 AM

>I'm really glad I read to the bottom of this post. While I
>have used Auto Iso for my D70, then D90, and now D7000, I had
>never thought of using it in Manual mode. I love shooting
>dance which is usually poor lighting and fast action - I have
>done well with this in S, but next I will try M.
>
>By the way - Love Nikonians! Lost interest in DPR because of
>the fairly frequent abuse some of the members would dole out
>to those asking simple, naive (some would say
>"stupid") questions.
>
>Thanks for maintaining a forum with a sense of Values.
>
>Bill
Hi Bill,
Dance is like hockey, uneven light that constantly changes due to the sometimes constant movement and the nature of the event.
Manual lets you set the faster shutter speed you need to get a sharper image and stop the action, and the ability to set the lens aperture allows me to control the depth of field. Easy if you have lots of light.
The D7000 has excellent 100 to even 6400 ISO capabilities that allow me to control my settings to what I want and let the cameras CPU control the third factor needed in a correct exposure,ISO.
This is very different from using fixed ISO with S or P or a mode.
If in S or P mode, the Aperture moves up and down, changing the dept of field according to the light to get the best exposure.
In A mode, you set the F stop, but the shutter moves up and down, getting sometimes blurry shots because shutter speed is to low. Auto ISO seems more unpredictable in the S, P, A modes.
You are in more control in M mode.
Now flash and Auto ISO is for another post.
Magazine reviews are just that, meant to sell magazines. Nikonians appears to be a place where the truth is more apt to come out.

hnagy

Cairo, EG
33 posts

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#54. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 53

hnagy Registered since 02nd Feb 2013
Sat 09-Feb-13 12:26 PM

It's just my second week with both Nikon D7000, as well as my first DSLR after working with FuJi S3300.
I'm very happy also with this forum and your kind and true support.
ALso, I feel so anxious for discovering new techniques and features in my D7000.
I think I will use Auto ISO as you said in scenarios that changes of light situation will occurs a lot, as well as during my family gathering so I can just focus on people and impressions, and not on the camera configuration.

agitater

Toronto, CA
4551 posts

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#55. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 54

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Sat 09-Feb-13 12:42 PM

>I think I will use Auto ISO as you said in scenarios that
>changes of light situation will occurs a lot, as well as
>during my family gathering so I can just focus on people and
>impressions, and not on the camera configuration.

What a great response. I think the sentence, or something like it, should form the first line of every photography course and instruction book.

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Chris Platt

Newburg, US
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#56. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 45

Chris Platt Silver Member Nikonian since 30th Sep 2012
Sat 09-Feb-13 02:33 PM

I rarely use auto ISO because unlike changes in aperture or shutter speed, changes in ISO influence the quality of the image recorded on the sensor. If you increase ISO, you decrease the signal to noise ratio and dynamic range. I just want that compromise to be a deliberate decision on my part when it is necessary.

I don't want to blow white plumage on a bird because I forgot I had auto ISO set. My left thumb is now pretty well trained to find the ISO button while my right thumb spins the command dial - and I know what I have just done to the image.

I imagine there are a host of circumstances where there is a known acceptable range of ISO settings that will have an insignificant impact on quality while providing shooting flexibility - but it's just not a setting I'm comfortable leaving on the camera.

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hnagy

Cairo, EG
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#57. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 55

hnagy Registered since 02nd Feb 2013
Sat 09-Feb-13 03:09 PM

>>I think I will use Auto ISO as you said in scenarios
>that
>>changes of light situation will occurs a lot, as well as
>>during my family gathering so I can just focus on people
>and
>>impressions, and not on the camera configuration.
>
>What a great response. I think the sentence, or something like
>it, should form the first line of every photography course and
>instruction book.
>
Really thanks for your encouraging words my friend.

agitater

Toronto, CA
4551 posts

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#58. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 57

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Sat 09-Feb-13 03:31 PM | edited Sat 09-Feb-13 03:33 PM by agitater

>Really thanks for your encouraging words my friend.

You're welcome for sure.

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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
3574 posts

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#59. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 55

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Sat 09-Feb-13 04:17 PM

The wider range of acceptable ISO that all the modern Nikon's have has allowed shooting manual and Auto ISO to be the most effective mode in changing conditions. A and S mode always risks a ruined shot if conditions change and results in artistic factors like DOF and shutter speed to move out of a useful range. Setting aperture for desired DOF and shutter to the lowest speed that you are confident in being fast enough, Auto ISO can adjust over a wider range than would have been acceptable in the past.

Regarding flash, it all makes more sense when you consider that the metering in the camera is separate from the flash metering.
When metering, flash is not considered so what you have based on shutter and aperture is all you get until the flash fires based on its own calculation. The Auto ISO runs up the ISO just as it would if the flash was not active, shooting in the ambient light levels with the setting for aperture and shutter. Before the flash even calculates its contribution the camera has increased the ISO to where the camera alone is trying to expose correctly.
Turn it off if you do not want Auto ISO to be used in that moment before the flash is triggered. The camera will do what it has to for a proper exposure regardless of a flash attached or not.
I have my U1 and U2 set up for basic ambient and for flash. Both are manual exposure but the main difference is setting a preferred ISO for flash shots. If in lower ambient conditions, and I want to balance ambient to flash, I do it by simple advancing or retarding ISO with any set aperture and shutter speed I think is best for the scene. But upping the ISO, flash power drops which allows for continuous shooting if desired, without waiting for the flash to rearm, and of course it also extends flash battery life.

Nikon is fine tuning features to take best advantage of the wider acceptable ISO range of more modern cameras like the D7000, 600, 800 and 4.



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claude_dumas

Blainville, CA
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#60. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 59

claude_dumas Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Jan 2013
Sat 09-Feb-13 08:57 PM | edited Sat 09-Feb-13 11:25 PM by claude_dumas

what a clever idea : never thought using auto-iso with Manual !! thanks very much, looks promising ! If D7000 could take into account the focal length in auto-iso setting, wouldn't it be better however to use A mode ?

Which leads me to another question : why Nikon is so cheap with firmware update ? It seems that they never improve it, apart from fixing obvious bugs. This does not bring value to customers...

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RRRoger

Monterey Bay, US
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#61. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 60

RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter Member
Sun 10-Feb-13 12:00 AM

>
>Which leads me to another question : why Nikon is so cheap
>with firmware update ? It seems that they never improve it,
>apart from fixing obvious bugs. This does not bring value to
>customers...

Simple:
They want you to buy the next latest-greatest camera body instead of giving you a "free upgrade".

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km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
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#62. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 61

km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009
Sun 10-Feb-13 05:13 AM

Plus they have learned that any feature upgrade entails changes to operation and for every person who likes the change another one screams that they ruined their camera. To make operational improvements, wait to introduce them in new models. Think of the uproar if the Auto ISO change was made with an update to d90 or d300
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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RRRoger

Monterey Bay, US
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#63. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 62

RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter Member
Sun 10-Feb-13 12:53 PM

>Plus they have learned that any feature upgrade entails
>changes to operation and for every person who likes the change
>another one screams that they ruined their camera. To make
>operational improvements, wait to introduce them in new
>models. Think of the uproar if the Auto ISO change was made
>with an update to d90 or d300
>Stan
>St Petersburg Russia

<Quote<<<

Good point Stan,

I have quite a few software programs that I have rolled back
to a previous version or pre free upgrade
to get the features that they eliminated.

However, I usually upgrade my camera firmware when new firmware is available
because they almost always entail fixes.

When has Nikon ever added a feature with firmware?
I cannot think of any.


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briantilley

Paignton, UK
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#64. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 63

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Sun 10-Feb-13 02:02 PM

>When has Nikon ever added a feature with firmware?
>I cannot think of any.

Nikon has often added or improved functionality (as opposed to fixing a fault) via firmware updates. Firmware 2.02 for the D3 and Firmware 2.00 for the D2X are just two examples, both of which added some things that the "s" version of the cameras offered.

Brian
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RRRoger

Monterey Bay, US
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#65. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 64

RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter Member
Sun 10-Feb-13 02:10 PM | edited Sun 10-Feb-13 02:13 PM by RRRoger

Thanks Brian,

What exactly were those added functions?
I've had a D2x, D2xs and D3 with buffer upgrade and don't remember.

The D7000 needs 1080P at 30fps Video among other "things".

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briantilley

Paignton, UK
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#66. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 65

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Sun 10-Feb-13 02:52 PM | edited Sun 10-Feb-13 02:54 PM by briantilley


D3 Firmware 2.02

D2X Firmware 2.00

But we're getting away from the point of the thread

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

agitater

Toronto, CA
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#67. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 60

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Sun 10-Feb-13 03:25 PM | edited Sun 10-Feb-13 05:15 PM by agitater

>Which leads me to another question : why Nikon is so cheap
>with firmware update ? It seems that they never improve it,
>apart from fixing obvious bugs.

That's not accurate. Nikon may not make an absolute habit of adding features via firmware updates, but it has done so often enough over the years. Basically, when deciding on which camera to purchase, I tend to make a decision based on the features already built into the camera. If a particular camera doesn't have the features I want, I don't buy it. I think that hoping for new features to be provided through a future firmware update is a bit like hoping for something for free. It certainly happens from time to time, but it's not much of a basis to criticize the maker if it doesn't happen.

I pay for the features offered in the camera design when it's released. I don't expect new features to show up in a firmware update. I only expect bug fixes, feature corrections and perhaps also refinements of existing features to show up in bug fixes.

>If D7000 could take into account the focal length
>in auto-iso setting, wouldn't it be better however
>to use A mode?

FWIW, the Nikon D600, D800 and D4 use the current focal length to establish the minimum shutter speed. AFAIK, the Canon 5D Mark II and III also use the current focal length to establish the minimum shutter speed. Neither manufacturer have offered the feature in the form of a firmware update for earlier models.

I think aperture priority is perfect for all sorts of different kinds of photography, but it's not for everyone and it's not appropriate for all subjects and situations. Manual/Auto ISO is one of the most versatile ways for street shooters and event shooters to use Nikon bodies ever since the D700, D3 and D7000.

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hnagy

Cairo, EG
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#68. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 67

hnagy Registered since 02nd Feb 2013
Tue 12-Feb-13 04:15 PM

Dear All, I found the solution and tried it myself
in summary, keep the minimum ISO to 200 NOT 100, maximum to whatever it suits you (3200 or 6400 or 12800, etc.)
Also, put the minimum shutter speed to whatever suits you too ( I put 1/50 for my 18-105 kit lens).
I got
Part One:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZpvVjo5QGY

Part Two:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTVzrAM_tcQ

I tested it and it is really MARVELOUS.

elec164

US
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#69. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 68

elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009
Tue 12-Feb-13 06:14 PM

>Dear All, I found the solution and tried it myself
>in summary, keep the minimum ISO to 200 NOT 100, maximum to
>whatever it suits you (3200 or 6400 or 12800, etc.)

The Videos you linked to were about a D700 which has a base ISO of 200. The D7000 base ISO is 100. I believe the intent of his suggestion from that video link was that while you set a maximum ISO via the Auto-ISO menu, you still controll what ISO you start at up to the maximum set. So again, with the D7000 you would be better served by using ISO 100 to start, and set the maximum to what you can tolerate noise wise.

Pete

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hnagy

Cairo, EG
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#70. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 69

hnagy Registered since 02nd Feb 2013
Tue 12-Feb-13 06:51 PM

>>Dear All, I found the solution and tried it myself
>>in summary, keep the minimum ISO to 200 NOT 100, maximum
>to
>>whatever it suits you (3200 or 6400 or 12800, etc.)
>
>The Videos you linked to were about a D700 which has a base
>ISO of 200. The D7000 base ISO is 100. I believe the intent of
>his suggestion from that video link was that while you set a
>maximum ISO via the Auto-ISO menu, you still controll what ISO
>you start at up to the maximum set. So again, with the D7000
>you would be better served by using ISO 100 to start, and set
>the maximum to what you can tolerate noise wise.
>
>Pete

Actually, he faced the same problem when setting it to 100.
Also, it didn't work with me when I assigned it to 100, but worked well with 200.
I don't know the reason, although he described it in his video.
Can you please try it too and update us?

elec164

US
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#71. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 70

elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009
Tue 12-Feb-13 10:42 PM

>Actually, he faced the same problem when setting it to 100.

The D700 (model spoken about in video) does not have an ISO 100. It has LO 1 which is akin to using ISO 100. I believe it's done through post capture bit manipulation (not 100% sure on that).


>Can you please try it too and update us?

I have used Auto-ISO as I described without issue. To make sure I just tried it with P,S,A and M modes and it works. When there is sufficient light the camera selects ISO 100. When there isn't it raises the ISO as needed to maximum set value.

Perhaps it's an issue with the LO settings. Never had a camera that had them so cannot test it.

Pete

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ColColt

Knoxville, US
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#72. "RE: Auto ISO and the D7000" | In response to Reply # 71

ColColt Gold Member Nikonian since 19th Aug 2008
Fri 27-Nov-15 10:58 PM | edited Fri 27-Nov-15 10:59 PM by ColColt

Oops-failed to see the date of the last post.


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