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Auto ISO sensitivity....

Ob1chubster

UK
23 posts

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Ob1chubster Registered since 05th Dec 2011
Sat 07-Jan-12 05:49 PM

Hi all....I have been using this today whilst out shooting some dogs and when reviewing the images I notice that the iso number that is shown on the info screen is red. Why would this be ?

mklass

Tacoma, US
7421 posts

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#1. "RE: Auto ISO sensitivity...." | In response to Reply # 0

mklass Platinum Member As a semi-professional involved in all manner of photographic genres including portraiture, sports, commercial, and events coverage, Mick is always ready to help Nikonians by sharing his deep knowledge of photography and printing. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 08th Dec 2006
Sat 07-Jan-12 05:08 PM | edited Sat 07-Jan-12 06:33 PM by mklass

Not sure on the D7000, but on the D700 and D3s that means that the ISO was determined by AutoISO rather than manually set. I imagine it is the same for the D7000.

Mick
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aolander

Nevis, US
3938 posts

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#2. "RE: Auto ISO sensitivity...." | In response to Reply # 0

aolander Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Sep 2006
Sat 07-Jan-12 05:10 PM

It's because your using auto-ISO (like your title says), and the ISO used is different than what you selected.

Alan

kentak

US
950 posts

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#3. "RE: Auto ISO sensitivity...." | In response to Reply # 0

kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010
Sat 07-Jan-12 06:31 PM

In addition to what the others have said, you may find it useful to note that the words "ISO/AUTO" will be flashing in the viewfinder when auto ISO has engaged and is setting an ISO value different from your preferred one. Otherwise, the words remain non-flashing.

Also, I choose "Show ISO sensitivity" in menu d3, which allows me to keep an eye on how much the ISO is changing while auto is engaged.

Kent

Ob1chubster

UK
23 posts

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#4. "RE: Auto ISO sensitivity...." | In response to Reply # 3

Ob1chubster Registered since 05th Dec 2011
Sun 08-Jan-12 10:55 AM

OK, thanks all, I wasnt sure whether it meant that it was out of range or something similar. Red to me means a warning.

Along those lines if using auto iso is there anything in the viewfinder that would let you know that a scene cannot be correctly exposed with the min /max iso/shutter speeds you have selected in the menu ?

texspeel

Fairfax Station, US
391 posts

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#5. "RE: Auto ISO sensitivity...." | In response to Reply # 4

texspeel Silver Member Nikonian since 09th Nov 2011
Sun 08-Jan-12 12:47 PM

I don't think you get a warning because if the scene cannot be correctly exposed within the bounds of your settings, the camera will exceed your setting. There is a very oblique discussion in the D7000 owner's manual under Auto ISO Sensitivity Controls, but Fellow Nikonian Darrell Young has an excellent description in his book "Mastering the D7000".
In short, Darrell's explanation - shooting in programmed or aperture priority. The camera will keep the ISO as low as possible until it hits the minimum shutter speed you set in the ISO sensitivity settings. It then starts increasing the ISO until it hits the max ISO value you set. If there still not enough light, it will then decrease shutter speed below the min shutter speed you set to try and achieve proper exposure.
If you don't have a copy of Darrell's excellent book, I'd recommend you get a copy. I read it from cover to cover when I got it and find myself refering to it frequently.
Enjoy your D7000.

"Nothing can be recognized without light and shade. It is only through the eye, the window of the soul, that we can truly understand the complex workings of nature." - Leonardo da Vinci

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