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Photography in wet weather questions

Artilleryman33

Lakewood, US
18 posts

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Artilleryman33 Registered since 31st Dec 2012
Mon 21-Jan-13 11:18 PM

I have a Nikon D7000 I had for a month now. I live in a state where it is either always rainy or foggy so events I want to take pictures of I don't . I am afraid of ruining my camera. I am in the military stationed in Washington State. Is there anything I could buy for my camera to make it all weather? Any pointers on camera settings? I am enjoying my camera so far. I would love to venture outdoors

JosephK

Seattle, WA, US
7064 posts

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#1. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 0

JosephK Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his excellent and frequent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community in the Nikonians spirit. Nikonian since 17th Apr 2006
Mon 21-Jan-13 11:45 PM

I tend to put the camera in roughly the same rain gear I am wearing. Granted my cameras have a bit better weather sealing than the D7000. Clear plastic and rubberbands usually get the job done in light rain. Heavy rain I am too lazy to be out in.

On the to-buy list:
http://www.stormjacket.com/SJ1.html

---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
Joseph K
Seattle, WA, USA

D700, D200, D70S, 24-70mm f/2.8, VR 70-200mm f/2.8 II,
50mm f/1.4 D, 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 DX

billD80

US
2238 posts

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#2. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 0

billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007
Tue 22-Jan-13 12:35 AM

ISO320 will give you noise free images, while allowing some leeway in shutter speed and f/stop. The D7000 isn't afraid of too much moisture, but the lenses may not be as weather-proof. Mist isn't a worry, but I don't like water directly dripping on the gear. Also, be aware that running outside into humidity, after being inside with A/C can cause a good deal of condensation. NEVER change lenses if the camera isn't yet acclimatized. Try to do so indoors, then venture out.

Maybe carry a dry, light, small towel. Try to carry the camera under your coat, until shooting.

There are a few tricks with plastic bags and rubber bands...

I would get a rider on your insurance specifically naming the camera and your lenses. That can really help should damage occur.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

hyalite

US
47 posts

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#4. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 0

hyalite Basic Member
Tue 22-Jan-13 03:02 AM

Browse through the rain protection products at B&H. Read the reviews. Perhaps one of these products will work for you.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?atclk=Discontinued_Not+Discontinued&sts=ma&N=174&Ntt=Rain+protection+camera+dslr

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ericbowles

Atlanta, US
10524 posts

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#5. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 0

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Tue 22-Jan-13 12:04 PM

A little moisture or mist on the camera won't make much difference. There is some weather protection on the D7000. The weak points are going to be the buttons and controls. For example, the buttons are small rubber disks with a raised center. As long as you have just a little moisture, it won't get through the seal, but any pressure forcing water under the flap is a problem.

With your lenses there are two problems. The front element or filter can gather drops of water - and a lens hood is a big help in avoiding droplets. I also use a lens cap between images with blowing mist or fog. Zoom lenses and lenses that extend when they focus pose a different problem. These lenses can collect water on the extended part of the barrel, and it can be carried into the lens interior. Be very careful not to let water get inside your lens - and use drying techniques and warm air to dry lenses thoroughly to prevent fungus.

What all this means is you need to provide shelter and use absorbency as a backup. The starting point is to minimize the amount of water your camera is exposed to from rain or mist. A little rain might be ignored - but if you are out in that rain for half an hour or more, it could be a problem. A hard rain needs serious protection - and you probably are not shooting in hard rain. And mist is just the same as light rain - except it often is blown by the wind. Protection starts with an umbrella or cover for your camera and increases depending on the amount of water.

Products like a the Vortex Storm Jacket cover your camera while allowing access. The Think Tank Hydrophobia is a higher cost alternative providing more protection. Some products not only cover your camera and lens, but also provide access for a flash.

Finally - water will get on your camera. When it gets on your camera or lens, try to blot with an absorbent material rather than wiping off water. I carry a couple of small absorbent towels from REI in my camera bag for this issue. I also carry a small lens cloth in a holder clipped to my camera strap.

Generally speaking, I would readily use the camera in fog or mist and not worry too much. If you are out a long time, a small towel to blot water will be useful. I would try to avoid too much rain, but if you plan to shoot in the rain you'll need something like the Storm Jacket. I keep a Medium Storm Jacket clipped to my camera pack at all times. If you get too much rain, it's hard to take good photos anyway.


Eric Bowles
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thormx538

US
83 posts

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#6. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 5

thormx538 Registered since 05th Jul 2012
Tue 22-Jan-13 12:27 PM

Has anyone used the refrigerator to dry their gear out after being in damp/humid conditions?

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jbloom

Wethersfield, US
7735 posts

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#7. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 5

jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Donor Ribbon awarded for his generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004
Tue 22-Jan-13 02:31 PM

Eric has given some good advice. As someone who often has to shoot in the rain, covering sports, I would only add that even a little bit of protection is better than none. Shooting from atop a monopod, in light rain or mist I'll sometimes just drape a towel over the top of the camera and lens, covering most of it. Even that little bit of protection keeps water from building up on the camera surface where it can find its way through the button and dial ports.

And if all else fails, a plastic garbage bag makes for an effective emergency rain cover. Just punch a hole in the closed end and stick the end of the lens through.

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

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ericbowles

Atlanta, US
10524 posts

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#8. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 6

ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2015 Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005
Tue 22-Jan-13 05:07 PM

I've never used a refrigerator since I wanted warm temps. I have put my camera in front of a heat vent. I've also heard of putting it in a sealed bag with a little uncooked rice to absorb moisture.

Jon - good idea about a towel. Even if it gets wet, the towel keeps most of the water off the camera. You can just wring it out if it is too wet.

Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
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Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

DaveSoderlund

Geneva, US
619 posts

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#9. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 5

DaveSoderlund Silver Member Laureate Ribbon awarded as a Winner in a Nikonians Best of Images Annual Photo Contest Nikonian since 29th May 2010
Wed 23-Jan-13 12:20 PM

Based on recent experience I'll second Eric's recommendation of the Storm Jacket. On the Nikonians workshop in Acadia NP last fall with Les Picker we shot for several hours in pretty steady light rain and mist. I had bought a Storm Jacket for the trip -- it kept my camera quite dry and allowed me to get a couple of really cool waterfall pictures.

dave

http://davidmsoderlund.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidsoderlund/

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MEMcD

US
31270 posts

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#10. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 0

MEMcD Moderator In depth knowledge in various areas Nikonian since 24th Dec 2007
Wed 23-Jan-13 01:55 PM

Hi Ray,

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
Get a quality Rain Cover like the Think Tank Hydrophobia and don't look back.
Good Luck and Enjoy your Nikons!

Best Regards,
Marty

Garen T

Hawthorn Woods IL, US
161 posts

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#11. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 0

Garen T Registered since 20th Jan 2013
Wed 23-Jan-13 02:44 PM | edited Wed 23-Jan-13 02:47 PM by Garen T

I use mine outdoors all the time, it is tougher than you think, but I always keep one of these http://www.amazon.com/OP-TECH-USA-Rainsleeve-18-Inch/dp/B000PTFDYO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358958771&sr=8-1&keywords=camera+rain+sleeve in mybag just in case,and if sitting on my tripod waiting for a shot I often just drape a black garbage bag over the whole setup.

This is from my last trip to Washington, and as you can see, I and all my gear got soaked! Everything was fine after drying it out!

Click on image to view larger version

Garen
www.garentphotography.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/garent/

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EAPhoto

Asheboro, US
75 posts

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#12. "RE: Photography in wet weather questions" | In response to Reply # 11

EAPhoto Registered since 16th Jan 2013
Thu 24-Jan-13 02:17 PM

Always having a few garbage back stuffed into my camera bag has saved my rump many times.

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G