Even though we ARE Nikon lovers,we are NOT affiliated with Nikon Corp. in any way.

English German French

Sign up Login
Home Forums Articles Galleries Recent Photos Contest Help Search News Workshops Shop Upgrade Membership Recommended
members
All members Wiki Contests Vouchers Apps Newsletter THE NIKONIAN™ Magazines Podcasts Fundraising

DX Lenses and Crop Factor

dperry23

US
5 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author
dperry23 Registered since 02nd Mar 2013
Tue 12-Mar-13 12:33 PM

When using FX lenses on a DX camera, we use the crop factor to ensure we are choosing the best lens for the job. However, if a lens is labled DX, do we take the focal length at face value, or do we have to apply the crop factor as well?

Leonard62

Pa, US
4419 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#1. "RE: DX Lenses and Crop Factor" | In response to Reply # 0

Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Writer Ribbon awarded for his contributions to the Nikonians Resources articles library Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009
Tue 12-Mar-13 12:00 PM

> However,
>if a lens is labled DX, do we take the focal length at face
>value, or do we have to apply the crop factor as well?

Actually you do both. The AFS 35mm f1.8 DX lens is a 35mm lens no matter what camera you put it on. However on a DX camera body it will have the same view angle as a 52.5 mm lens on a FX body.

Len


Visit my Nikonians gallery.

WD4MLA

Sylva, US
951 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#2. "RE: DX Lenses and Crop Factor" | In response to Reply # 0

WD4MLA Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002
Tue 12-Mar-13 12:08 PM

The short answer is the crop factor applies to both FX & DX lens.

When I shot film I had a 24mm lens for landscapes. Now that I shoot digital and use a DX camera, I bought a 16-85VR lens so the 16mm will give me the field of view that I got on the 24mm film camera.

Jerry Jaynes
Great Smoky Mountains
of North Carolina

http://www.flickr.com/photos/by_jerry_jaynes/

MEMcD

US
31313 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#3. "RE: DX Lenses and Crop Factor" | In response to Reply # 0

MEMcD Moderator In depth knowledge in various areas Nikonian since 24th Dec 2007
Tue 12-Mar-13 03:50 PM

Hi Demetrius,

Welcome to Nikonians!
The focal length of FX lenses and DX lenses are the same.
DX lenses project a smaller image circle at the sensor plane than FX lenses.
Since the sensor plane is in the same location on both FX and DX bodies as well as film bodies the "1.5 X crop factor" applies to All lenses when they are mounted on a DX body.
Good Luck and Enjoy your Nikons!

Best Regards,
Marty

avm247

Rancho Cordova, US
18758 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#4. "RE: DX Lenses and Crop Factor" | In response to Reply # 0

avm247 Moderator Awarded for high skills in documentary architecture and aviation photography Donor Ribbon. Awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Charter Member
Tue 12-Mar-13 05:28 PM

I think in terms of a 35mm film camera (135 format) with a negative of 36mm x 24mm. When I think of lenses and focal lengths, I think in terms of what that lens will give me as an angle of view with respect to a 35mm film or FX digital camera:
24mm = 84 degrees
35mm = 62 degrees
50mm = 46°

In DX format:
24mm = 61°
35mm = 44°
50mm = 31°30'

But I'm not comfortable learning the angle of view for DX focal lengths, so I translate to FX angle of views with the 1.5x crop.

In FX, a normal lens is the 50mm lens with 46° angle of view in DX, a 35mm x 1.5 = 52.5mm whic is pretty close to 50mm and has an angle of view of 44° ... making it a "normal lens" for DX bodies.

Long story longer, yes, do the crop factor thing if you think in terms of film/FX lenses and are comfortable with it.

I hope that makes sense.


Anthony

The Moderator Page and My Gallery
The important things in life are simple; the simple things are hard.

G