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Where am I going wrong?!

andyet

UK
1 posts

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andyet Registered since 07th May 2010
Fri 07-May-10 07:27 PM

I shot a tree that was behind the sun, but the trunk appears to be near as dammit black, which want how it appeared to my naked eye.

How do I get the light back on the trunk next time? Please help, this is pissing me off!

I shot using my d700/14-24 at 14 mm, f2.8, the iso was set to auto

I tried to attach the image but couldnt

MEMcD

US
31610 posts

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#1. "RE: Where am I going wrong?!" | In response to Reply # 0

MEMcD Moderator In depth knowledge in various areas Nikonian since 24th Dec 2007
Fri 07-May-10 06:46 PM

Hi Andrew,

Welcome to Nikonians!

First: Take a deep breath and relax!!!
Did you mean that the tree was in front of the sun or in other words, the tree was between you and the sun?
If so, the tree would likely be a siloette or a "black" shape as you discribe.
It sounds like you were using the Matrix meter.
If the surrounding scene is brighter or darker than your subject the matrix meter can under expose or over expose the image.
If the tree fills the circle in the center of the viewfinder you could try using center weighted metering. If not use Spot metering with the active AF point somewhere over the tree trunk.
You could also dial in some negitive exposure compensation in any metering mode.
Good Luck and Enjoy your Nikons!

Best Regards,
Marty

Asgard

East Frisia, DE
60644 posts

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#2. "RE: Where am I going wrong?!" | In response to Reply # 0

Asgard Administrator He is your Chief Guardian Angel at the Helpdesk and knows a lot about a lot Nikonian since 07th Apr 2004
Fri 07-May-10 07:07 PM

Andrew,

without an image it is hardly to help you.

Here are the instruction how you can upload/show an image:

https://wiki.nikonians.org/index.php/How_do_I_post_images%3F

Gerold - Nikonian in East Frisia
Eala Freya Fresena

Floridian

Tallahassee, Florida, US
2948 posts

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#3. "RE: Where am I going wrong?!" | In response to Reply # 0

Floridian Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Feb 2007
Sat 08-May-10 12:43 AM

>...How do I get the light back on the trunk next time?...

Spot meter off the tree. But if you're shooting a scene with very high dynamic range, this may overexpose what's behind the tree. You might also try D-lighting.

Randy

blw

Richmond, US
28708 posts

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#4. "RE: Where am I going wrong?!" | In response to Reply # 3

blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004
Sat 08-May-10 06:48 AM

> You might also try D-lighting

Good thought, although d-lighting is only going to buy about a stop. If we're talking about a tree backlit by the sun, we're probably talking about six to ten stops of difference.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

KenLPhotos

Stewartstown, US
1935 posts

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#5. "RE: Where am I going wrong?!" | In response to Reply # 0

KenLPhotos Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Jul 2009
Sat 08-May-10 10:24 AM

Unfortunately, even the best cameras today are not as good as the eye. But there are technics available to get a good image from your backlit tree - such as 'HDR'.

Hang in there and after learning HDR, you will be happy with capturing this difficult type of picture.

KenL

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



There are many 'photographs of beautiful objects' but not so many 'beautiful photographs of objects'.

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