Even though we ARE Nikon lovers,we are NOT affiliated with Nikon Corp. in any way.

English German French

Sign up Login
Home Forums Articles Galleries Recent Photos Contest Help Search News Workshops Shop Upgrade Membership Recommended
members
All members Wiki Contests Vouchers Apps Newsletter THE NIKONIAN™ Magazines Podcasts Fundraising

What to do, re:D700?

jwgreene

Kamloops, CA
15 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author
jwgreene Registered since 03rd Apr 2011
Mon 04-Apr-11 12:15 AM

I have recently come into a few dollars from my mothers estate. She always loved when I sent her new photos and constantly encouraged me in my photographic pursuits; therefore, I feel she would be very happy that I am planning on stepping up from a semi pro setup (D200 w/ prime lenses) to pro gear. I already know I want what I think of as "the holy Nikon trinity" of lenses, namely the 14-24, 24-70, and 70-200 2.8s.

My problem is this: Do I drop the cash on a D700 now, or shoot with my D200 until the D700 replacement drops?

On the con side of waiting, my D200 is getting a little long in the tooth.

On the pro side of waiting, I cannot afford to buy the D700 now and then upgrade when the D800 (or whatever) drops. While I know that the D700 is a significant step up from my D200... I am just unsure whether it is the best bet at this time.

What do you, the humble and knowledgable D700 users have to say?

rutherfordphoto

Vancouver, CA
5099 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#1. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

rutherfordphoto Awarded for his article contributions to the Resources Registered since 26th Aug 2002
Sun 03-Apr-11 10:40 PM

I went to the D700 from the D200... I never regretted it, and even if the D800 were introduced tomorrow, I have no plans to upgrade, regardless of the specs or price. The D700 is a huge step up, in so many ways.

In the right hands, the D700 is a very capable camera. It's images have graced the pages of National Geographic magazine, hung on billboards, covered Olympic Games, conflicts, and natural disasters. If you feel you need more camera than that, I would recommend waiting for the D800.

If you think that it's good enough, then buying now will afford you the pleasure of shooting with one of the greatest cameras to ever be released by Nikon.

~Cheers, Allan~
www.allanschroeder.com

DanieleR

US
25 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#2. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

DanieleR Registered since 13th Mar 2011
Mon 04-Apr-11 09:42 AM

Get the D700 now. If you end up feeling it's lacking something then sell it when the time comes for the D800. Plus most big stores give you a 30 return policy, take advantage of it to help you make sure you made the right purchase.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

GiantTristan

Stamford, US
2669 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#3. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

GiantTristan Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jan 2006
Mon 04-Apr-11 11:48 AM

I believe that it is always better to first invest in good lenses instead of camera bodies. Lenses keep their value, while camera bodies rapidly depreciate. You will definitely get a much greater benefit for your photography form an excellent lens than from changing from a D200 to a D700. I have used both the 70-200 and the 24-70 with the D200 with excellent results.

Tristan

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

rmwilson

Snow Hill, US
33 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#4. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

rmwilson Registered since 09th Feb 2011
Mon 04-Apr-11 11:49 AM

Read my recent post "Took the D700 Plunge". It may give you some factors to consider.


Ron

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

shutterpunk

Waianae, US
55 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#5. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 3

shutterpunk Registered since 04th Jul 2006
Mon 04-Apr-11 01:21 PM

I'd follow Tristan's advice. Buy the lenses first, which you can use on your D200 until you can afford the FX body, whether that's a D700 or its successor. Once you have the money, I'd buy whatever FX body is available at the time. If the D700 successor is out, though, keep in mind that it will probably be a a significantly higher price point. The D700 was $3000 when it was first introduced.

I am also in the camp of people who feel absolutely no pressure to go after the D700's successor. The performance of the D700 is all I'll ever need. So until it fails me, it will be my primary camera body. Getting the successor body would be like adding a second layer of icing on a cake. What's the point? It's sweet enough already!

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

CharlieS

US
1729 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#6. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

CharlieS Registered since 29th Aug 2007
Mon 04-Apr-11 02:08 PM

I moved up to a D700 late last year, mainly because of the high ISO performance, not as a replacement for my D300 but to complement it. I now have the best of both worlds, the crop factor on DX and high iso capability when the light isn't the best.
I had entertained the D700 purchase for sometime, though until it got to the point the ISO performance was necessary for an indoor family function where flash wasn't allowed I didnt see it as absolutely necessary. Had it not been for that, what i would have waited for, and would currently upgrade to now when available is a 4-5 format which would offer the advantage of full frame 8x10 prints without cropping, plus minimal cropping on larger print sizes, allowing for more pixels in printing the origional file.

As mentioned glass is a good investment and holds its value, well beyond what a camera body does.
If you dont need the higher iso performance, another option is a more inexpensive D300/S body and add some top end lenses along with it. This allows a body upgrade and some quality glass to go with it, Then consider the upgrade to the D700 replacement when it comes available. In all probability that will be some time now with the issues japan is facing.

____________________________________________________________________
When no one is looking, Pigs can walk on they're hind legs

jwgreene

Kamloops, CA
15 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#7. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 5

jwgreene Registered since 03rd Apr 2011
Mon 04-Apr-11 06:14 PM

The lenses are a done deal. I am just waiting to hear back from the Nikon dealer I used to work for on what the best price they can swing for me on the 2.8s. I also have the finances to get a D700 at the same time. I am just still sitting on the fence, as I've purchased a model that has been replaced several times (though not from Nikon) and it always makes me a little mental.

I suppose I could wait 4-6 weeks and see what transpires.

I am really looking forward to my new glass though!

ajdooley

Waterloo, US
3320 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#8. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

ajdooley Gold Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006
Mon 04-Apr-11 09:58 PM

First of all, there's not going to be a replacement for the D700 in coming weeks. Recent events in Japan may delay any replacement even longer than to existing timeline. Second, you will find the D700 to be such a distinct leap in capability from the D200 -- which I used before going to the D700, that you will experience the WOW! factor that all D700 owners experience. Third, the lenses are full-frame professional lenses. They almost beg for the FX sensor to show their true capabilities. Finally, You will be able to recoup much of your inverstment in your D700 if you actually want to get the next model. And whatever comes next will be in very short supply for months after it arrives if past experience is replayed. I'd get the D700 and the lenses. In fact, I just got another D700.

Alan
Waterloo, IL, USA
www.proimagingmidamerica.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Excalibur2010

US
18 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#9. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 8

Excalibur2010 Registered since 03rd Dec 2010
Tue 05-Apr-11 01:08 AM

Get the d700 - you won't regret it! And they are seemingly becoming difficult to get already due to the situation in Japan.

Also, I would go with the 17-35 2.8 over the 14-24. I had the 14-24 and sold it. It is really more of a specialty lens- doesnt use filters and I can't really explain why but I just didnt like shooting with it.

The 17-35 is in this months pop photography- not a review but a quick mention. It is undeniably one of the greatest nikon pro lenses of all time.

Good luck! Enjoy the new gear!!

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

tamrokin

Fremantle, AU
359 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#10. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 9

tamrokin Registered since 09th Feb 2006
Tue 05-Apr-11 05:31 AM

Tick for the 24-70mm & 70-200mm.

Hestitation on the 14-24mm. I love that it is an impressive piece of technology - but with that mass of glass out there it is fragile and has to be handled with extra special care. Plus it is heavy to handle. There are lighter alternatives to consider that will also be cheaper and comparable in performance. It is more a specialist lens I think.

D700 - the replacement will have to have a higher spec. and more whistles & bells ..... but I expect will only have marginal improvements in the resulting images. The D700 will be relevant for many years to come - just as the D200 still produces great results today.

The D700 is already at a significant discount to it's price of a couple of years back ..... but wait and when the replacement comes you can wrestle with that decision.

Depends whether you want to have all of your thrills of your new gear at the same time or space the purchases out and savour each one individually.

Rob


Black camera, Black lenses, Black bag ...... & NAS Black hole .....

Len Shepherd

Yorkshire, UK
12722 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#11. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003
Tue 05-Apr-11 07:52 AM

With the D7000much lower in price than a D700 and the 16.2 MP D5100 announced today - what do you expect to gain switching from DX to FX?
The D700 is going to give you less resolution than the D3100/5100/7000, and negligible sharpness and resolution differences to 1600 ISO compared to a D300s.
If you are set on FX my advice is upgrade lenses now - and wait for 16 or 18 MP FX options.

Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

Excalibur2010

US
18 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#12. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 11

Excalibur2010 Registered since 03rd Dec 2010
Tue 05-Apr-11 11:35 AM

I was wondering how long before someone would jump in and recommend the consumer grade d7000. If you have the money get the d700- better feel, better build, uses the pro standard-cf cards, and in my shooting performs much better. The higher megapixel is at this point in the digital game largely unimportant with the exception being specific tech needs in specialized shooting.

In my opinion the d700, D3, D300s are the only pro choices- my wife shoots the d7000 enough said.


Enjoy the gear!

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

LMMiller9

Potomac, US
1168 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#13. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

LMMiller9 Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2005
Tue 05-Apr-11 02:02 PM | edited Tue 05-Apr-11 02:03 PM by LMMiller9

You have asked a question on which everyone will have an opinion. I would definitely go for the D700. There is something to be said for a pro body over something like the D7000. I have not seen a side by side comparison of shots in low light between these two cameras and sensors. It would be interesting.

I agree that we may have a long wait for the D800 given that the plant is in Sendai which was damaged, although they announced a few days ago that it is re-opening.

As to lenses: JMHO, but I would not buy the 24-70 or the 14-24. I have both and I don't use them anymore at all. I would buy the 24-120/f4.0 and the 16-35/f4.0 and a 35, 50 and 85 1.4 primes, and the 70-200/2.8. But, that is just my opinion. One thing is for sure, even if you stick with a DX camera, don't buy anymore DX lenses. Any of the above lenses will be put to good use long after the camera is obsolete.

Good luck.

Larry Miller, Potomac, MD
DF/D810
http://lmmillerphotography.smugmug.com/

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

agitater

Toronto, CA
4526 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#14. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 12

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Tue 05-Apr-11 06:05 PM

>I was wondering how long before someone would jump in and
>recommend the consumer grade d7000. If you have the money get
>the d700- better feel, better build, uses the pro standard-cf
>cards, and in my shooting performs much better. The higher
>megapixel is at this point in the digital game largely
>unimportant with the exception being specific tech needs in
>specialized shooting.

I think Len's suggestion is perfectly valid. I shoot both bodies as well as a D3s. I personally think the D7000 has its own great feel, which is different from the D700 which itself is different from the D3s. In the right hands, the D7000 produces unassailably professional results. Then again, the OP stated clearly that he has his sights fixed on a D700 or its successor.

>In my opinion the d700, D3, D300s are the only pro choices- my
>wife shoots the d7000 enough said.

Hey! I shoot a D7000 too, and I am not your wife. Enough said (though I'm not sure exactly what that means). If that was a backhanded crack about female inferiority, I'm gonna tell on you. I purely love watching guys catch heck from their wives!

My Photo.Net Gallery
My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson

agitater

Toronto, CA
4526 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#15. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Tue 05-Apr-11 06:27 PM

>I already know I want what I think of as "the
>holy Nikon trinity" of lenses, namely the 14-24, 24-70,
>and 70-200 2.8s.
>
>My problem is this: Do I drop the cash on a D700 now, or
>shoot with my D200 until the D700 replacement drops?
>
>On the con side of waiting, my D200 is getting a little long
>in the tooth.

Information about the successor to the D700 was expected to drop sometime in August 2011, the usual month in which Nikon has for many years made pro body announcements. It's likely that the disaster in Japan which has affected parts production, supply chain managements, productivity and so on - despite the fact that Nikon's Sendai pro body plant is again operating (albeit well below production capacity) - will delay the release of any D-series pro body this year. It's possible that Nikon will pull a rabbit out of its hat, but I doubt it.

Buy a D700 now. You'll get the benefit of several years/generations worth of advancements in sensor, shutter, autofocus system, image processing, image handling and usability, along with a tougher body, much better power management/battery life, significantly better technical image quality and - wait for it - a brand new warranty. The wonderful quality of photos that any capable photographer can capture with the D700 is unquestioned. That said, your D200 is used by amateurs and pros around the world right now to produce award winning photos. If you decide to wait for the D700 successor, it's not like you'll be stuck using a terrible camera. Quite the contrary actually.

Buy a D800 (or whatever Nikon decides to call the D700 successor). You could be waiting until 2012, unless Nikon manages to pull of a truly remarkable turn-around given the state of production now. If I'm right about prospective pro body delays though, be prepared to continue using your D200 for another 8-10 months at least.

My Photo.Net Gallery
My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson

briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#16. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 15

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Tue 05-Apr-11 06:52 PM

>Information about the successor to the D700 was expected to
>drop sometime in August 2011, the usual month in which Nikon
>has for many years made pro body announcements.

Of the 12 "pro" DSLR announcements since 2001, only the joint D3/D300 launch took place in the month of August. The others were in the months of February (D100, D2Hs), June (D2Xs), July (D1H/D1X, D2H, D700, D300s), September (D2X), October (D3s), November (D200) and December (D3X).

All we could really infer from all this is that a "pro" announcement in the March to May period would be contrary to past practice - but who knows...?

Anyway, back to the original question... whatever may happen in the future, I would lean towards getting a D700 now, especially if you can afford to get it and the fast FX lenses at the same time

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

agitater

Toronto, CA
4526 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#17. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 16

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Tue 05-Apr-11 07:04 PM

>>to
>>drop sometime in August 2011, the usual month in which
>Nikon
>>has for many years made pro body announcements.
>
>Of the 12 "pro" DSLR announcements since 2001, only
>the joint D3/D300 launch took place in the month of August.
>The others were in the months of February (D100, D2Hs), June
>(D2Xs), July (D1H/D1X, D2H, D700, D300s), September (D2X),
>October (D3s), November (D200) and December (D3X).

Right you are Brian. I had in mind another product - nothing to do with Nikon or even digital photography. That's what I get for multi-tasking. Sorry everybody for the misinformation.

My Photo.Net Gallery
My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson

jwgreene

Kamloops, CA
15 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#18. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

jwgreene Registered since 03rd Apr 2011
Thu 07-Apr-11 02:18 AM

Tomorrow morning I go pick up:

1 x D700
1 x 24-70 f/2.8
1 x 70-200 f/2.8
2 x 8gb Sandisk Extreme IV memory cards

I decided that going from a 24mm f/2.8 prime on a DX body to a 24-70 f/2.8 on an FX body will give me the wider shots I feel I've been missing.

I thought long and hard about the D7000, but I feel that in terms of handling and durability, I'd be taking a backwards step that I really dont want to take. I totally think the 7000 is an awesome body and that it is as capable of capturing excellent images as the D700 is. I just want a little more in terms of ergonomics than what the D7000 offers.

Livetohunt

US
21 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#19. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 18

Livetohunt Registered since 12th Jan 2011
Thu 07-Apr-11 11:12 AM

I just sold my D7000 & DX lens to purchase my D700 & could not be happier. I also got the 24-70 f/2.8 and 50mm f/1.4 I captured some awesome images with the D7000, but I wanted FX and the smaller body did not fit quite as well in my hands. Plus the 24-70 on the DX body always felt a little cumbersome to me. Now, that lens on the D700 is like apple pie & ice cream! I am only a few days into owning the D700, but so far its been great!

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Mossyhead

Attalla, US
18 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#20. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 18

Mossyhead Silver Member Nikonian since 14th Feb 2011
Thu 07-Apr-11 12:19 PM

I don't believe you will regret any of the decisions you have made, there is nothing like the feel and flow of using a pro body. You probably will discover that you now have 2 completely different sets of lenses, because you will not use your DX lenses on the D700 because of the crop factor. The FX lenses will be useful on both bodies, but I will bet you will want to keep them reserved for your D700. The bottom line is you now have both ends of the spectrum covered (wide angle & telephoto )so enjoy every day.
SRC

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

jwgreene

Kamloops, CA
15 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#21. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 20

jwgreene Registered since 03rd Apr 2011
Thu 07-Apr-11 03:45 PM | edited Thu 07-Apr-11 09:26 PM by jwgreene

Heh. I am actually a bit of a fast glass snob. I've never been able to afford the 2.8 zooms (until now) so I've shot with an all prime kit, namely the 24 f/2.6, 50 f/1.8, and 85 f/1.8. So I am not actually losing any lenses from my kit, since they will all work fine on the FX bodies. I've resisted the urge to buy DX zooms for the reason that I knew I'd want to get an FX body at some point.

EDIT:

sasafrassagrabbabragh. GRRARGH.

They sold the D700 they had put aside for me, so now I have to wait until tomorrow or monday for the one being couriered in from another location. SAD FACE.

I am slightly salved by having two big gold boxes with some wicked glass in them!

Excalibur2010

US
18 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#22. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 21

Excalibur2010 Registered since 03rd Dec 2010
Fri 08-Apr-11 11:11 AM

Oh, those gold boxes. You will be acquiring more and more- its an addictive hobby ! Enjoy the new stuff- good decisions on the gear. What is the price on the d700 this week? I noticed last weekend that people on here were paying a few hundred more than a year ago.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

jwgreene

Kamloops, CA
15 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#23. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 22

jwgreene Registered since 03rd Apr 2011
Fri 08-Apr-11 01:52 PM

I paid 2249 canadian for mine. London Drugs price matched Lens and Shutter, saving me a trip to the nearest Lens and Shutter.

And these just add to my previous collection of gold boxes

rodsky77

US
345 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#24. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 7

rodsky77 Registered since 08th Jan 2008
Mon 11-Apr-11 04:25 PM | edited Mon 11-Apr-11 04:36 PM by rodsky77

With the disaster in Japan, I feel that there will not be a replacement any time soon.
After I got the D700 2 years ago, I realized that the only body that would be worthwhile to get is the D3s. The D700 is so much camera that even if Nikon introduces a 16 MP body with video, I would not get it because I have not outgrown the D700 yet. Instead, I just got the D7000 to complement my D700 and for a lighter body/kit and to experiment with video.

The 14-24 is a specialty lens, I have one, it's great, but I take it out rarely, just for the panoramic shots. I can promise you, that if you get the D700 now, you will not regret it, nor will you see the next version of this camera for probably another year, and then you will not feel like you have been had. If anything, we will see a D400 first, since the d300 technology is 4 years old at this point.

Go for it, you will like it

New Jersey Nikonian


Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

jwgreene

Kamloops, CA
15 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#25. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

jwgreene Registered since 03rd Apr 2011
Sat 16-Apr-11 01:41 AM

Thank you all for your advice. My D700 arrived today and I am already in love!

I am not really happy that it doesnt offer a mass storage USB option, since that is my prefered way to offload images to my computer, but I am sure I will survive... or go pick up an UDMA card reader

The viewfinder makes me tremble in joy compared to my D200. So much brighter and bigger. And the FX sensor giving me a true 24mm focal length is, I think, priceless!

T42

Atlanta, US
301 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#26. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 25

T42 Basic Member
Sun 17-Apr-11 08:56 PM

Congratulations on your new D700, jwgreene.

I have had a D700 since August of 09 and have been quite happy with its performance. I bought it to put a full frame behind my old Nikkors, some dating to the 60s. I have not been disappointed.

I bought one of those external CF card readers right after I got the camera. It works pretty fast, but I decided not to use it unless absolutely necessary.

I got to thinking about how there are pins INSIDE the D700 to mate with those CF cards. I sincerely question the wisdom in that design. When a pin breaks or bends, off to Nikon repair the camera goes. That cannot be cheap or convenient.

My prejudice in this dates to my past career in the telephone industry. It was then preferred that pins went into cables and sockets into terminal equipment. That way when a pin breaks one replaces a cheap cable, not the terminal equipment.

So, I have resolved not to switch that CF card in and out of the camera unless absolutely necessary, and then with the utmost care. I cannot see putting one of my CF cards into a device over which I have no control ... like those readers in stores where folks make prints. I use the direct transfer USB cable as much as possible. And anything that goes to one of those stores is on a USB thumb drive (no pins).

From what I have seen on the net, it looks like my suspicions have been confirmed with failures in Canon and Nikon equipment using CF cards. Those failures in Canon gear that I read about were not well correlated with any particular brand of CF card. Kingston, Sandisk, and others were implicated.

One thing I read was that a broken pin fragment from a reader could get lodged inside a card and then damage a camera when inserted. The same could happen with grit or sand in one of those tiny holes. Probably a good idea to keep CF cards in those little protective plastic cases when not in a camera, and not carry them about loosely in the pocket or bag.

Someone know a good reason not to be concerned about this? I would be only too happy to learn that it is not really an issue.



Henry

A Certified Dinosaur
Nikons F, F2, D700, L35AF, Leica M3, & Kiev 4a

jwgreene

Kamloops, CA
15 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#27. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 26

jwgreene Registered since 03rd Apr 2011
Sun 17-Apr-11 10:58 PM

Only anecdotal evidence, but I have swapped between five CF cards on my D200 for nearly five years without a single problem. The way I see it is that the guide rails on the sides of the crd keep everything aligned to the extent that it takes a lot of mishandling to bend or break one. I shot hockey one year and made several very hasty changes with nary a problem.

agitater

Toronto, CA
4526 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#28. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 26

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Sun 17-Apr-11 11:35 PM | edited Sun 17-Apr-11 11:36 PM by agitater

>Someone know a good reason not to be concerned about this? I
>would be only too happy to learn that it is not really an
>issue.

It's only an issue if you can't get the concern out of your mind. There have been a vanishingly small number of bent pins reported here on Nikonians. The tiny number of reports rarely include an explanation as to how the pin(s) were bent.

Basically, your suspicions are groundless. Relative to the number of Nikon camera owners (in the millions) who regularly insert and remove CF cards from a long line of D1/2/3/x/s and D100/200/300/700 bodies, the number of bent pin incidents is statistically insignificant. If it was any sort of issue, it would be reported here - it is not.

That problems occur from time to time is a fact no doubt. I've read reports elsewhere about people accidentally dropping things (coffee, water, dirt/detritus, etc.) into the mirror box during a lens change. It does not follow that we should never change a lens. That said, it is certainly possible to leave a CF card in a D700 slot for a very long time, transferring photos by USB connection, reformatting the card from time to time in the camera. There remains, in that practice, the problem of removing the card when it is eventually superceded by a larger capacity or higher speed model.

There is another more practical problem. The CF card slot design in Nikon bodies is meant to be used. Sports photographers, photojournalists, researchers, travelers and so on, frequently go through several CF cards a day (some pros go through several cards per hour). There is no practical way to attach a D700 to a laptop and wait patiently for photos to transfer, all while watching great shots go by because the photographer is afraid of bending a CF card slot pin. The notion is absurd. What happens when the CF card is full and the photographer is only a few hours into the shooting day? Should the photographer stop shooting?

Of course, one can always invest in CF cards of enormous capacity, thereby avoiding the need to change cards on the fly. But using a single, very high capacity card for an entire day of shooting simply invites the chance of data loss. There's another scary thought I guess, but the incidence of CF card failure is also vanishingly low.

The reason CF card pin failures are not associated with any particular brand of CF card is that pin failures due to manufacturing defects are exceedingly rare. Of the tiny number of pin failures which occur, bet that user error/sloppiness/inattention is to blame in the majority of cases.

I watch sports shooters at hockey, football, soccer, basketball and baseball games go through 5-10 CF cards. The shooters are using Nikon D3/s/x, D700, Canon 1Ds MKIII, 5D/5D MKII bodies. The shooters are quick draw artists when they change CF cards - snap out the used card, slam in an empty card. No problem. There are hundreds of sports photographers active in the U.S. alone every single day. We don't hear any stories from any of those shooters about bent pins or anything of the kind. These cameras are meant to be used, hard, day in/day out.

My Photo.Net Gallery
My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson

T42

Atlanta, US
301 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#29. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 28

T42 Basic Member
Mon 18-Apr-11 02:55 AM | edited Mon 18-Apr-11 03:22 AM by T42

Thanks, Guys.

It is good to know that bent CF pins are of such little concern here among fellow Nikonians. As I said up-thread, I had read reports on the web where such problems existed. One account, by Tom Guilmette, was very specific in the nature of the problem, how it happened, and how that it was handled. A number of comments included some from other folks who had found Canon less than helpful when confronted with the same issue that Tom described in this link:
http://www.tomguilmette.com/wp/my-blog/archives/1942/comment-page-2

Of course I will change that card whenever I really need to. And I intend to do it with considerable care too. I will also go out of my way to keep debris from getting into those CF card holes.

Now I am guessing that perhaps Canon had an issue with the quality of their CF interface connectors or associated card guide rails. If one Googles for "bent pins in cf slots," he will find a few references to Nikons, but by a HUGE margin, most of the links refer to Canon cameras and users.

Lucky us. Makes me glad I stayed with Nikon, the company which did not abandon its followers by switching lens mounts.



Henry

A Certified Dinosaur
Nikons F, F2, D700, L35AF, Leica M3, & Kiev 4a

agitater

Toronto, CA
4526 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#30. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 29

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Mon 18-Apr-11 02:26 PM

>One
>account, by Tom Guilmette, was very specific in the nature of
>the problem, how it happened, and how that it was handled. A
>number of comments included some from other folks who had
>found Canon less than helpful when confronted with the same
>issue that Tom described in this link:
>http://www.tomguilmette.com/wp/my-blog/archives/1942/comment-page-2

Unfortunately, Mr. Guilmette doesn't hazard a guess or offer any information as to how the edge of his 32GB Kingston CF card was damaged. It looks like impact damage, but without any information to corroborate that there is no way to say for sure. The pins in the CF card slot are not stiff enough to puncture through the tough plastic of the card edge. The general pin/slot tolerances are loose enough, certainly, to account for slight variations in CF card manufacturing. But once the edge of a CF card is damaged to the point at which the edge plastic is physically blocking (or partially blocking) a hole, the corresponding pin is certainly going to be damaged. The solution? Look at the CF card edge before inserting it.

>Now I am guessing that perhaps Canon had an issue with the
>quality of their CF interface connectors or associated card
>guide rails. If one Googles for "bent pins in cf
>slots," he will find a few references to Nikons, but by a
>HUGE margin, most of the links refer to Canon cameras and
>users.

This is not a problem specific to Canon, Nikon or any other camera maker. There may be a preponderance of pin slot problems for Canon owners right now, but that's just common statistical variation. Invariably, regression to the mean will show a similar number of pin slot problems in Nikon bodies at some point. The point really is that it's not a pin slot problem because the slots, from maker to maker, are basically identical in quality and materials. The problem, when it rarely occurs, almost invariably is caused by a damaged CF card. All we have to do to avoid the problem is store our CF cards properly, as has been suggested in an earlier post, and also look at the card edge to check for damage before inserting it into the slot.

My Photo.Net Gallery
My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson

briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#31. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 29

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Mon 18-Apr-11 02:38 PM

I think your research might be over-emphasising the occurrence of bent or damaged CF contact pins - for any brand of camera. A quick Google finds very few complaints about it, and Canon doesn't seem to attract significantly more than Nikon.

As has been pointed out, careful handling and storage of your cards, coupled with a visual inspection before inserting a card into a camera or reader, is sufficient to virtually eliminate the chance of damage

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

Len Shepherd

Yorkshire, UK
12722 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#32. "RE: Now CF card pins" | In response to Reply # 31

Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003
Tue 19-Apr-11 04:18 AM | edited Tue 19-Apr-11 04:20 AM by Len Shepherd

>As has been pointed out, careful handling and storage of your cards, coupled with a visual inspection before inserting a
>card into a camera or reader, is sufficient to virtually eliminate the chance of damage
I agree - but you also need to get to know your camera.
CF cards go in the opposite way round on a D3 and a D300s - card front side to the right on the D3, and to the left on a D300.
Trying to force a card the wrong way into the slot is the cause of most pin damage.
Edit - a correctly aligned card should go in with light pressure from just one finger.

Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#33. "RE: Now CF card pins" | In response to Reply # 32

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Tue 19-Apr-11 06:27 AM

>CF cards go in the opposite way round on a D3 and a D300s -

Good point! Making sure the card is the right way around was meant to be covered by my "careful handling" phrase, but it's good to make it explicit

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

ajdooley

Waterloo, US
3320 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#34. "RE: Now CF card pins" | In response to Reply # 33

ajdooley Gold Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006
Tue 19-Apr-11 08:31 AM | edited Tue 19-Apr-11 08:33 AM by ajdooley

Good reminder. I seem to remember someone in this group saying they somehow inserted a CF card into a Nikon backwards and having just about to use visegrips or a similar method to get it out. Ever since I have been super careful to look AND feel the ridge on the back edge of the card to ensure it faces the right direction. Then press gently. If it is not going -- there's probably a good reason. I have never figured out how a card was made to fit backwards, but I guess a person with strong hands might be able to make anything fit -- sort of! It is always good counsel to treat cameras like the expensive instruments they are.

Alan
Waterloo, IL, USA
www.proimagingmidamerica.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#35. "RE: Now CF card pins" | In response to Reply # 34

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Tue 19-Apr-11 09:06 AM

>I have never figured out how a card was made to fit backwards...

No, nor me, given that the grooves in the top/bottom edges are of different widths, but it's as well to be careful all the same

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

T42

Atlanta, US
301 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#36. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 30

T42 Basic Member
Sun 24-Apr-11 02:45 AM

>The problem, when it
>rarely occurs, almost invariably is caused by a damaged CF
>card. All we have to do to avoid the problem is store our CF
>cards properly, as has been suggested in an earlier post, and
>also look at the card edge to check for damage before
>inserting it into the slot.
>

Thanks. That makes sense. That, and insert it correctly oriented, and with gentle finger pressure.

Henry

A Certified Dinosaur
Nikons F, F2, D700, L35AF, Leica M3, & Kiev 4a

Len Shepherd

Yorkshire, UK
12722 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#37. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 0

Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003
Sun 24-Apr-11 05:19 AM

Welcome - but your profile indicates you are more advanced than your question implies - it says you have a D700, 24-70, 70-200 and 2 other decent FX lenses
If you have a D200 then the D300 is pro gear, the D200 was pro gear, the D700 is close to obsolete pro gear, and the D7000 is capable of overall better results than the D300 or D700.
Apart from the D700 being in very short supply and costing more than twice as much as a D300 or D7000 it offers no particular advantage or disadvantage to 1600 ISO using a 20 inch wide print - about the limit for best resolution from 12 MP - as a measure of image quality.
If the D400 and D800 were on sale the shortlist would be different.
You have only 1 chance of upgrading the D700 with only 12 MP and no video is likely to drop very heavily in value when replaced.
One option might be to upgrade short term to a second hand D300 and take the final decision when the D800 comes out.
Even when the D800 comes out it might be 9 months before 15-20% street discounts become available. On a budget it could be more than a year before the D800 become available at decent discounts.

Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

Baaker

Dumbarton, UK
923 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#38. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 37

Baaker Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Aug 2009
Mon 25-Apr-11 06:39 AM | edited Mon 25-Apr-11 06:41 AM by Baaker

>If you have a D200 then the D300 is pro gear, the D200 was pro
>gear, the D700 is close to obsolete pro gear, and the D7000 is
>capable of overall better results than the D300 or D700.


Len, taking your argument to a logical conclusion the D300s must make the d300 obsolete, or close to obsolete? As to the D700 being close to obsolete then a few member's hairs will be rising on the back of their necks and the keyboards will be getting tapped furiously? As to the D7000.

>capable of overall better results than the D300 or D700.

You will should back up this subjective statement with some evidence? Looking at some of your previous posts you don't seem to rate the D700 very much. Goes against the general thinking by most members on this forum. The next time I am out with my D700 and someone asks how it performs should I tell them it is close to obsolete and don't bother buying one? Of course you are entitled to your opinion.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/43019448@N04/

briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#39. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 37

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Mon 25-Apr-11 06:57 AM

>Welcome - but your profile indicates you are more advanced
>than your question implies - it says you have a D700, 24-70,
>70-200 and 2 other decent FX lenses

If you read the whole thread, Len, you'll see in reply #18 that Bill already made his decision and purchased a D700 together with "fast glass"

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

jpFoto

US
1114 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#40. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 37

jpFoto Registered since 25th Jun 2010
Tue 26-Apr-11 09:47 PM | edited Tue 26-Apr-11 11:43 PM by jpFoto

Len

With all due respect, and you are entitled to "due respect" for your innate understanding and explanation of lens performance. You have been described as "the final word on lenses." However, I think that you are wrong about the D700. I have probably owned almost every professional film camera up to the F4s and have owned a few very good DX DSLRs, but I had never liked the 35mm format until the D700. In my opinion, it is by far the finest and most capable camera that Nikon has ever made and that I have ever owned.

The D700 is one camera that will never become "obsolete." There will definitely be better cameras, but the D700 will never be obsolete. Just read the posts from new and current D700 owners. You have suggested that the D7000 is superior to the D700 and since I have never used a D7000 I cannot dispute your claim, however, I find it very hard to believe. I think that you have lost your credibility when you make such a loose and unknowing statement.

On that note, I must confess that as an opportunist, I am expecting delivery of a D3s tomorrow and will most probably sell my D700 since I cannot justify owning both. However, I consider the D700 the finest camera that I have owned to date.

Respectfully,

jP

jgould2

Fort Pierce, US
4582 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to send message via AOL IM

#41. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 40

jgould2 Gold Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his excellent and frequent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community in the Nikonians spirit. Nikonian since 13th Oct 2007
Wed 27-Apr-11 12:03 AM

Hi JP.

Keep in mind that according to Len's profile he does not own a D700.

JIM

agitater

Toronto, CA
4526 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#42. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 37

agitater Gold Member Donor Ribbon awarded for his very generous support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007
Wed 27-Apr-11 12:06 AM

> . . . the D700 is close to obsolete pro gear, and the D7000 is
>capable of overall better results than the D300 or D700.

Len - I read this and immediately headed for the bin with my D700. I stopped just in time though. If I could get better results out my D7000 than my D700, it would be a boon to me - less weight to carry on long walkabouts, a slightly smaller shoulder bag, a lighter battery, smaller memory card wallet, etc. Can't quite seem to get the "overall better results" I want out of the D7000 just yet though. Working on it.

My Photo.Net Gallery
My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson

GiantTristan

Stamford, US
2669 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#43. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 37

GiantTristan Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Jan 2006
Wed 27-Apr-11 12:37 AM

Maybe one should have a look a the etymology of the word "obsolete".

This is according to Merriam Webster:

Synonyms: antiquated, archaic, dated, démodé, demoded, fossilized, kaput (also kaputt), medieval (also mediaeval), moribund, mossy, moth-eaten, neolithic, Noachian, outdated, outmoded, out-of-date, outworn, passé, prehistoric (also prehistorical), rusty, Stone Age, superannuated

I am most concerned regarding "moth eaten" and will from now on always keep some moth balls in my camera bag...

Tristan

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Baaker

Dumbarton, UK
923 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#44. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 43

Baaker Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Aug 2009
Wed 27-Apr-11 06:38 AM

I hesitate to state that FX is better than DX as some claim. As others have stated in the past they should be seen as different and I agree. I own and use on an equal basis the D300 and the D700. However this is a new one? Claiming that a DX camera is better than FX, especially when the release of the two wasn't far apart and not qualifying the statement will confuse members who are thinking of buying a new camera. I think an explanation behind the thinking is overdue?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/43019448@N04/

briantilley

Paignton, UK
30235 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#45. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 44

briantilley Gold Member Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Donor Ribbon awarded for his support to the Fundraising Campaign 2014 Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003
Wed 27-Apr-11 07:08 AM

>Claiming that a DX camera is better than FX, especially when
>the release of the two wasn't far apart and not qualifying the
>statement will confuse members...

I agree that qualification of that particular statement is required. Having never used a D7000 myself, I'm not in a position to offer any insight.

Bear in mind, though, that the D700 was released over two years before the D7000, which is a huge interval in terms of the evolution of digital image processing. You'd expect many things to have improved in that time, perhaps to the point where a DX camera can exceed the performance of an FX camera, at least in some areas.

So, Len - in which areas does the D7000 surpass the D700, in your view...?

Whilst we're on this subject, I'm seeing an increasing tendency for people in this Forum to get defensive about the D700. That attitude isn't really helpful, and can lead to some nasty exchanges that I'm sure we'd all rather avoid. We should accept that at some point, the D700 - like all DSLR's - will start to look outdated compared with the latest models, even though it will still be just as capable as it always was

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

rodsky77

US
345 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#46. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 45

rodsky77 Registered since 08th Jan 2008
Wed 27-Apr-11 08:44 AM

I have and use both.

The D7000 does not beat the D700, at least in my opinion.

1. The D7000 may have 100% coverage in the viewfinder, but the viewfinder itself is smaller than on the D700

2. The focusing is pretty fast on the D7000, but not faster than on the D700, in fact it's much slower on dimly lit subjects/areas (even with snappy primes)

3. The noise handling of the D700 is still one stop above the D7000, even at ISO 1600 - there are plenty of reviews with shots that prove this beyond all doubt.

4. The buffer is too small on the D7000 for shooting action in RAW format

5. The build of the D7000 is good, but it does not compare to the D700 - the D700 is a pro body and the the D7000 is a prosumer body at best - period.

The D7000 does not feel like a camera which you could really use to do a serious shooting session because of the above points.

The D7000 does have the following things going for it and these are why I bought it and use it:

1. Lightweight/smaller form factor - don't even notice it on my shoulder/even with the 17-55 f/2.8 attached - can always take it with me and not regret it if I don't take it out even for a single shot

2. Best IQ, focusing, weather sealing, ergonomics than any other camera of similar size/class (D90, D5001, D3000, 60D, 5xxD, etc) - could actually be used as a backup/2nd camera - took it as a 2nd camera on a shoot with f/2.8 14-24 attached - did not have to change lenses on the D700 with f/2.8 24-70 - got all the shots I wanted - did not have to worry about getting dust in the D700 while doing a lens change on the streets - was very happy

3. Video

4. Dual memory card slot - one for stills - the other for video

5. Can reuse all of my Nikon glass on it

6. Get the additional reach with my 70-200 VR

Perhaps the D400 body may one day be the DX camera that may surpass the D700. The D7000 simply does not.

And even if the D400 does surpass the D700, the way I really look at it is: does my best camera deliver images of the quality I want? As long as it does, it does not matter how good the next version of the D300 or the D700 is.

I will buy the D400 for my wife, who now uses the D300, but I will not sell the D300 because even when I picked up the D300 after the D7000 on a picnic recently, I could already feel the difference in handling of these bodies to know that I would choose even the D300 over the D7000 if I did not want video or a smaller form factor.

Cheers,
Kevin


New Jersey Nikonian


my Nikonians gallery.

Livetohunt

US
21 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#47. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 46

Livetohunt Registered since 12th Jan 2011
Wed 27-Apr-11 11:38 AM | edited Wed 27-Apr-11 11:39 AM by Livetohunt

Having owned both myself, I agree with everything Kevin has stated above. I actually sold my D7000 to help fund my D700 purchase. Still haven't regretted it

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

ssmumich00

US
429 posts

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this author

#48. "RE: What to do, re:D700?" | In response to Reply # 46

ssmumich00 Registered since 20th Mar 2009
Thu 28-Apr-11 03:10 PM | edited Thu 28-Apr-11 08:55 PM by briantilley



Funny reading this, I just downgraded from a D3 to a D700 and can almost carry over 15% of those comments when comparing the two (haha!)

But in all honesty, what I've seen with the 12 mp FX, I'd argue it might be physically impossible to replicate in noise-handling with ANY DX body. . . the D400 certainly will dual cards (SD/CF), 100% VF, and an 18 or 20mpx sensor. . . but still crammed into a small sensor, so the breath-taking detail/DR I see with the D700/D3 at ISO 2500, for instance, won't really be there IMO. . . ever.

Curious to see thoughts on waiting out for the D800. . .

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

G