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Nikonians Articles

Resources to save time and money, reduce the pain and speed up the learning curve.


Nikkor AF 28-200mm/3.5-5.6G ED IF Review
Lens Reviews

Nikkor AF 28-200mm/3.5-5.6G ED IF Review

Victor Newman (vfnewman) on November 7, 2003

All I can say is "All-in-one" zooms have come a LONG way. I am quite impressed with this little lens. I have to call this a "consumer" lens, but that's NOT because of the image quality. I'm still amazed at the results that can be gotten from this very compact, wide-range lens. Read more...

Tamron SP AF 180mm f/3.5 Di LD [IF] Macro 1:1
Lens Reviews

Tamron SP AF 180mm f/3.5 Di LD [IF] Macro 1:1

Paul Fisher (Paul_Fisher) on November 3, 2003

Tamron has long had a 90mm macro lens in both manual and autofocus versions, with a maximum aperture of f/2.5 or f/2.8. This lens has had a formidable reputation for sharpness and performance, and continues in production to this day thorugh several technological updates. More recently, Tamron has introduced a new lens which has attracted a lot of interest. Read more...

GretagMacbeth OneEye Photo
Accessories Reviews

GretagMacbeth OneEye Photo

Alan Clifton (AlanC) on October 24, 2003

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If you wish to ensure that the colour in images from a digital camera or scanner will be displayed correctly on your computer monitor and output correctly to your printer then you need accurate colour profiles for these devices to allow translation between the "working space" (such as sRGB or AdobeRGB) of the image data and the actual colour space of the device. Monitors and printers usually come with standard profiles developed by the manufacturer, but these are just a starting point. Read more...

Tamron SP 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di AF zoom lens
Lens Reviews

Tamron SP 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di AF zoom lens

Paul Fisher (Paul_Fisher) on October 24, 2003

Tamron released a compact lightweight high speed medium range zoom and macro lens. This brief review will attempt to describe the lens, give an indication of its quality, and meaningfully compare it with a well-known Nikkor zoom in the same price range. Read more...

How does a digital camera work?
How-to's

How does a digital camera work?

Darrell Young (DigitalDarrell) on July 30, 2003

The operation of a digital camera, from the standpoint of the user, is virtually the same as the operation of a 35mm camera. Most digital cameras imitate their older film cousins very well, so a new digital user has little to fear in the operation of the camera. If you are used to a point-and-shoot, or even an SLR (single lens reflex) 35mm camera, then you will be able to find a digital camera to meet your experience level. Read more...

UV, Haze & Skylight Filters
Accessories Reviews How-to's

UV, Haze & Skylight Filters

J. Ramon Palacios (jrp) on July 26, 2003

When we buy a lens it is with a purpose in mind, with great expectations and with some effort. Surely we want to protect it from dust, dirt, moisture, fingerprints, scratches and even from a fall. From my own personal perspective, the best way to give our lens that protection -in addition to care- is to place a good multicoated filter and a hood on it and leave them both there at all times, except when using an also multi-coated polarizer. Read more...

The Manfrotto 393 (Bogen 3421) Long Lens Support
Accessories Reviews

The Manfrotto 393 (Bogen 3421) Long Lens Support

Luc VN (LucVN) on June 20, 2003

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Many of us dream with making wildlife images, as those at the Nikonians Wildlife Photography Forum and in well made nature books. To begin to learn how, the need for a truly long lens soon becomes very apparent. Finally, I bought a 600mm f/4 AF-I Nikkor and was then confronted with how to gracefully support such a monster. My regular ballhead didn't seem to be the best of means. Read more...

How to Adjust Hoods for Rotating Filters
How-to's

How to Adjust Hoods for Rotating Filters

Don F. Echler (badcreek) on March 3, 2003

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I often use a polarizer and neutral graduated filters. These filters rotate to different positions, depending on the effect desired. The recent trend to deep, scalloped lens hoods (tulip shaped) present a problem with these filters. Because the lens hood is so deep, it's almost impossible to reach the filter ring. As a practical matter, these filters must be used with the hood removed. Read more...

What Filter System?
Accessories Reviews How-to's

What Filter System?

J. Ramon Palacios (jrp) on January 21, 2003

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There are two basic filter types or systems to choose from, the screw-in and the slide-in types. The first are circular integrated filters with a mounting ring that screws into the front thread of a lens, and with a thread on the other end to screw other filter(s) or attach a hood. The second consists of a threaded adapter to screw into the front of a lens and a filter holder with one or several slots, where square or quadrangular optical resin filters slide-in. Read more...

Diffusion & Softening filters
How-to's

Diffusion & Softening filters

J. Ramon Palacios (jrp) on November 20, 2002

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You may have wondered what are these filters for and what is the difference between the two. Both "diffusion" and "softening" filters are used towards the same objective: to reduce blemishes and wrinkles in portraiture. Make people look better. The soft filter is just a more elaborated diffusion lens. Read more...

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