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Nikonians Tele Converter Compatibility Table

Brian Tilley (briantilley) on April 22, 2014


Keywords: teleconverter, charts

One of the most common questions regarding Nikon and 3rd Party lenses is "Will lens X work with teleconverter Y?"

To help answer such questions, the Nikonians Team has created THIS CHART. >>

 

General tele converter usage

Teleconverters (“converters” or “TC’s”) are a relatively inexpensive way of extending the focal length, and hence the range, of an existing lens. However, their usage comes at a price in performance terms. Typically, AF speed may be reduced, and any tendency of the lens to “hunt” may increase. Image quality (resolution and contrast) is likely to be degraded somewhat. Lastly, an inevitable result of using any converter is a lessening of light transmission, and hence a darker viewfinder:

  • a 1.4x converter will lose 1 stop of light; an f/2.8 lens becomes an f/4 combination
  • a 1.7x converter will lose 1.5 stops of light; an f/2.8 lens becomes an f/4.7 combination
  • a 2x converter will lose 2 stops of light; an f/2.8 lens becomes an f/5.6 combination
  • a 3x converter will lose 3 stops of light; an f/2.8 lens becomes an f/8 combination.

Converters are designed to be used on longer focal length lenses. Prime lenses under about 100mm, zooms shorter than about 70-200mm, and “superzooms” like an 18-200mm, tend to give poorer results with converters.

The Nikon MF converters have limitations as to which focal lengths they can be used on. The TC-14A, TC-200 and TC-201 are intended for lenses of 200mm and less; the TC-14B, TC-300 and TC-301 are intended for lenses of 300mm and more.

Not all lenses will physically fit all converters. If the converter has a protruding front element, and/or the lens has a non-recessed rear element, attempting to mount the converter could damage both it and the lens. The Nikon TC-300 and TC-301 are good examples. Nikonians cannot be held responsible for any damage caused by mounting any converter on any lens.

Converters transmit various signals between the lens and camera using electrical contacts. 10 contacts are currently required for full operation, including autofocus and VR/OS/VC functions where the lens has them, with Nikon AF cameras. Autofocus is transmitted using the electrical contacts for AF-S, AF-I, HSM and USD lenses, or through a mechanical clutch known colloquially as “screwdriver” for other AF lenses. Nikon’s TC-xxE, TC-xxE II and TC-xxE III converters, as well as newer Sigma EX DG TC’s, do not have the “screwdriver” clutch. Some older 3rd Party converters such as the Kenko Teleplus MC4 and MC7 lack the contacts for AF-S/AF-I/HSM/USD lenses. Stopping down of the lens diaphragm is achieved via a mechanical linkage (which often rattles!).

If a VR/OS/VC lens will autofocus with a particular converter and camera combination, then in general VR/OS/VC will also work. If a lens will meter with a particular camera, then in general metering will also work with a converter attached.

Nikon’s TC-xxE, -II and -III converters have a tab on the front mounting ring that prevents them being mounted on anything but the longer “pro” Nikkor AF-S and AF-I lenses. It is possible to remove the tab with a grinding tool, but Nikonians cannot be held responsible for any damage caused by doing so.

Tamron SP Pro converters are functionally the same as the equivalent Kenko Pro 300 converters; any differences are cosmetic only. The Nikon TC-xxE and TC-xxE II converters have only cosmetic differences, but TC-xxE III converters have a new optical formula.

 

 

(14 Votes)
Brian Tilley Brian Tilley (briantilley)

Paignton, United Kingdom
Moderator, 28756 posts

12 comments

Chris Malacarne (chris_mal) on July 25, 2014

Good day fellow Nikonians! This chart is great! Thanks to all who put forth the effort! Please chime in if you have or know of someone who has had this issue. I have a Tamron 2x n-af bbar mc7 that was working perfect on my D3 and (older 80-200 2.8). Then all of a sudden when I attach it the focus jumps from front to back...never capturing a focus point. It moves very quickly and sharp. It is like it is not even searching for focus and has gone hay wire! Has any one had this happen? I have tried other lenses...same thing. Other bodies (D90)...same thing. I am 99% sure the tamron 2x mc7 has crapped out on me I am just looking to confirm this and the next question is where to get it fixed? Thanks

Dale Maas (marnigirl) on June 3, 2014

Disregard my query submitted on 2 June. According to Nikon's website the TC-17E II is NOT compatible with a Nikon 70-300mm lens AF-S lens. Dale

Raj Milan (s3191384) on June 3, 2014

A handy piece of information for first time buyers!

Dale Maas (marnigirl) on June 2, 2014

Ref: Lynn comment dated 9 May 2014 I also have a 70-300 AF-S. I cannot mount it to my TC-17EII. Unless I have misunderstood something, according to the chart they should be compatible. Any feedback appreciated. Dale aka Marnigirl

Lynn Gemeinhart (absaroka1) on May 9, 2014

I love this chart. I have wanted a teleconverter to help reach the long shots. According to the chart, an AF-S lens should be compatable with the TC-20E II. I have an AF-S Nikkor 70-300. I cannot get the lens to mount onto the teleconverter. I am using a D600. Am I misreading the chart? I don't wish to damage either one by forcing them.

John (the_shaman) on May 6, 2014

Great chart. very helpful indeed.

Bo Stahlbrandt (bgs) on April 29, 2014

The downloadable chart has now been updated with the latest models.

Bo Stahlbrandt (bgs) on April 24, 2014

David; Will ping the team on this and ask for update re TC-20E III.

David B Arkin (sazerac_the_dog) on April 23, 2014

I notice that in your chart you list the : Nikon TC-20E Nikon TC-20E II but do not the latest TC-20E III. I would have hoped you included the better III in comparisons. Is this omission on purpose or a "typing" error. Thanks for the information. David

KENT M. WHITNEY (KMWHITNEY) on April 23, 2014

Thank You, I discovered some years back (1964) if I wanted maximum compatibility, performance and quality, I married only Nikon to Nikkor and solved all the issues with one exception, "Cost"! If one wants the best product, engineered to work at the best Nikon engineered performance, bite the bullet and stay Nikon throughout! Thank you for the review, well worth the read and refresher, short and to the point! V/R The PhotogDog (Kent)

Zita Margit Kemeny (zkemeny) on April 23, 2014

Good to know this. Thanks :-)

Russ Kitchen (kayakers11) on April 22, 2014

Wonderful! I was looking for a chart like this & the usage info is a plus...thanks so much!

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