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Subject: "Large CME impact 3-16" Previous topic | Next topic
2pixels_short Gold Member Laureate Ribbon awarded for winning in the Best of Nikonians 2013 images Photo Contest Nikonian since 16th Oct 2003Sun 17-Mar-13 08:34 PM
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"Large CME impact 3-16"


Anchorage, US
          

Here are a few images as a result of the huge CME that hit the magnetosphere last night. The Kp Index is still high and there may be a chance for continued lights tonight.




At Kashwitna Lake

D700 - Noct-Nikkor 58mm ƒ/1.2 - ISO 1250 - ƒ/1.2 - 2 seconds



Red on the Moon

D3s - Nikkor 24mm ƒ/2.0 AI - ISO 4000 - ƒ/2.8 - 1 second



Corona with Big Dipper

D3s - Nikkor 24mm ƒ/2.0 AI - ISO 4000 - ƒ/2.8 - 1 second

Mike in Alaska


Visit Fortymile Photo

Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)
Attachment #3, (jpg file)

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Large CME impact 3-16
simonsi
18th Mar 2013
1
Reply message RE: Large CME impact 3-16
nrothschild Silver Member
18th Mar 2013
2
Reply message RE: Large CME impact 3-16
lastdaylight Gold Member
19th Mar 2013
3
Reply message RE: Large CME impact 3-16
2pixels_short Gold Member
19th Mar 2013
4
     Reply message RE: Large CME impact 3-16
lastdaylight Gold Member
19th Mar 2013
5

simonsi Registered since 17th Apr 2003Mon 18-Mar-13 06:42 AM
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#1. "RE: Large CME impact 3-16"
In response to Reply # 0


Auckland, NZ
          

Fantastic!

Cheers

Simon

A New Zealand Nikonian

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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nrothschild Silver Member Neil is an expert in several areas, including camera support Nikonian since 25th Jul 2004Mon 18-Mar-13 10:52 AM
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#2. "RE: Large CME impact 3-16"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Great images! I had to duck when I saw that last one

_________________________________
Neil


my Nikonians gallery.

  

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lastdaylight Gold Member Laureate Ribbon awarded for winning in the Best of Nikonians 2013 images Photo Contest Nikonian since 09th Dec 2007Tue 19-Mar-13 01:28 AM
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#3. "RE: Large CME impact 3-16"
In response to Reply # 0


Dallas, US
          

Absolutely fabulous! How often do you get red like that in the second one?


Mark Smith
Just like I previsualized it, more or less...

My Nikonians Gallery

My Website, www.lastdaylight.com

  

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2pixels_short Gold Member Laureate Ribbon awarded for winning in the Best of Nikonians 2013 images Photo Contest Nikonian since 16th Oct 2003Tue 19-Mar-13 05:18 PM
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#4. "RE: Large CME impact 3-16"
In response to Reply # 3


Anchorage, US
          

Mark,
While the predominant colors are green and gold from particle interaction with atmospheric oxygen, blues occur when nitrogen is excited. Because red is a slower longer wavelength of light it frequently is overlooked in an image. To get reds, one usually needs a longer exposure.

Below is from NASA

The color of the aurora depends on which gas - oxygen or nitrogen - is being excited by the electrons, and on how excited it becomes.
Oxygen emits either a greenish-yellow light (the most familiar color of the aurora) or a red light; nitrogen generally gives off a blue light. The blending of these colors can also produce purples, pinks, and white. The oxygen and nitrogen also emit ultraviolet light, which can be detected by special cameras on satellites but not by the human eye.
Source: NASA

Mike in Alaska


Visit Fortymile Photo

  

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lastdaylight Gold Member Laureate Ribbon awarded for winning in the Best of Nikonians 2013 images Photo Contest Nikonian since 09th Dec 2007Tue 19-Mar-13 11:51 PM
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#5. "RE: Large CME impact 3-16"
In response to Reply # 4


Dallas, US
          

Not sure about the gases, but if I was getting shots like that I would certainly be excited. Seriously, very interesting. And, beautiful work.

Mark Smith
Just like I previsualized it, more or less...

My Nikonians Gallery

My Website, www.lastdaylight.com

  

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