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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 19-May-11 12:18 AM
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"Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"


US
          

I have shot many pictures with my Nikon D7000 since getting it late last year, and quite a few of those photographs are true gems that have earned me an undeserved reputation as a great photographer. Last night I had an event to shoot, one that was both personal and professional: it was my daughter's last high school orchestra concert before she graduates from high school in a couple of weeks.

After maybe 150 shots, many appearing in the brief review screen as among the best I had ever done, near the end of the concert, I got a reading through the viewfinder that I didn't understand. On the left I saw the cryptic letters "Cd," and on the right, when I would press the shutter release, I'd see "Err."

When the graduating seniors in the orchestra assembled on the steps for that last Great Moment Together, I had nothing.

Nothing.

I even tried to swap the Sandisk 32Gb Class 10 card that had been in Slot 1 with the Sandisk 4Gb Class 6 card in Slot 2.

Same errors, and no action on the shutter release.

When I got home, that 32Gb card was unreadable. Windows 7 on my computer kept reporting that the thing was unformatted. Looking further into the matter, the card had no boot sector.

Ditto for the 4Gb card in Slot 2 (which had been my main card until I bought the heavy lifter Class 10 beast more than a month ago).

Thinking back on last night to figure out what happened, I have two possibilities that are the most probable, with the latter I describe below being more likely than this first one.

Possibility 1 (not as likely): Having worked with computers for decades, and having had disk failures before, something as catastrophic as boot sector destruction (especially on more than one drive) is often the result of over-heating. Supposedly, the Nikon D7000 is engineered with the recognition that the sensor can overheat, which is why high-quality movies can't be of more than 20 minutes in length (I think it's 20 minutes, anyway). Under rapid-fire shooting, which I was doing at several times during the evening, it's possible I cooked the two SDHC cards.

Possibility 2 (more likely): Towards the end of the evening, the SB-600 speedlight I had on the D7000 was flagging severely, even though I had put in four brand new, top-of-the-line Energizer photo batteries right before the event. I decided to sit down and swap out the Nikkor AF-S 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 DX VRII I'd been using all evening and put on my Nikkor AF-S 50mm f1.4G. In my rush to get the faster lens on, I forgot to turn off the camera. As soon as I unlocked the telephoto lens from its mount, I heard what sounded like the shutter cutting out, and the camera turned off. It is possible that what happened at that instant was the equivalent of pulling a USB flash drive out of its port without electronically unmounting it, first. Although doing that won't necesarily destroy a flash device, it's a very bad thing to do, and in a camera, it might be a quick way to execute any removable media that might be in the way of an unchoreographed shutdown.

So far, I've tried to recover the 150 or so RAW files on that Sandisk SDHC card with four different recovery utilities, but not one of them can see anything on the card, primarily because they all rely on the boot sector being in some semblance of recoverability.

As it stands right now, I've lost photographs that cannot be replaced, and quite a few people who were depending upon me will be sorely disappointed at my failure. (Yes, this is my failure: I had become so confidant in the quality and reliability of the D7000 and its peripherals that I didn't bother to take along my lowly D5000 as a backup, which would at least have allowed me to get that last, wonderful shot of those young people the last time they would ever be together like that.)

I am offering this rather long narrative as a cautionary tale. First, the Nikon D7000 is not a professional camera. Hammering it in a high-pressure photo shoot is bad practice, no matter how much people tell you they just love your photographs, and no matter how many nice, easy portraits, senior pictures, and pretty landscape prints you've sold.

Second, watch for warning signs that the camera is in distress. That SB-600 speedlight had never acted up before. It might have been warning me that something was going wrong. Maybe that lowly SB-600 was trying to tell me something the fancy digital readouts in the viewfinder display were going to let me know about when it was too late.

Third, if you have a back-up body, take it with you, no matter how well your primary camera has performed in the past and no matter how much you look like a geek staggering around with several bags of equipment hanging from your neck.

Finally, whether or not this is what caused the ruin of not one, but two SDHC cards, don't ever swap lenses with the camera turned on.

At this point, I'm out of business for a while, and it's not just because I've lost a couple of SDHC cards. I need to tone down my hubris about being such a great photographer and get out of the mind-set that, "It's a Nikon!" as an excuse for sloppy practices when people are relying on me, not my camera, to be as good as they need.

I apologize immediately for the length of this post and thank you for reading it.



Dark Wraith
Professor, Writer, Photographer
See my Gallery

  

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adcam Gold Member Nikonian since 31st Dec 2007Thu 19-May-11 01:25 AM
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#1. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0


Portland, US
          

Wow sorry to hear about your loss. Hopefully there is still a chance to recover something. In the end, the camera is still a machine and can fail anytime.

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Thu 19-May-11 01:30 AM
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#2. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Have you tried the SanDisk recovery software, with the cards left in the camera, not placed in an external reader?

Don't give up on getting the images off the cards. I hope you can salvage them.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 19-May-11 02:10 AM
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#5. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 2


US
          

With as many Sandisk SDHC cards as I have bought, you would think that I could find one of those little CDs they always used to include, but I can't. It turns out that Sandisk now seems to be outsourcing their recovery program to another company. I went to that company's Website and got the demo version of the recovery program, which required that I give them my phone number, which they promptly used to call me to market the upgrade to the full version.

Fortunately, I wasn't in the mood to dine on the caller's backside for fatiguing me, but I did let him know that the recovery program demo (which will identify the lost files but not recover them) found no files. He told me I could send the SDHC card to the company and, if they recovered the files, I would have to pay $275 to get them.

I thanked him for the offer and indicated that I would consider doing that.

In other words, I lied.

I don't feel good about that, especially since he seemed like a nice man. I didn't want to make him unhappy that he was talking to someone who would prefer not to give up personal property in such a way that I might not see it again if I didn't send him more money than I have right now. (Note the part in my original post about my daughter's upcoming graduation: in a couple of months, I'll be paying over $12,000 a year for her to go to college, which means I'll be moving into an Airstream trailer down-wind from the waste treatment facilities unless I can find a job as the assistant manager at a Jiffy Lube on the south side of Toledo and hook up with some divorcee with a good job, a gullible heart, and an unwanted collection of 8-track tapes I can sell as rare collectibles on eBay).

I'm not giving up. I know a boot sector failure is about as bad as it gets, and I've had only limited success in recovering hard disks with such a problem; but hard disks with FAT 32 architecture can be pulled out of the fire with some old DOS tricks, although I am aware that those same techniques aren't going to work on a large capacity SDHC card. In fact, it looked to me like one of the recovery utilities I downloaded and tried was using DOS (actually, the Windows pretend version of DOS) to do the same thing we used to do back in the day to recover data. The program failed to find anything except an "unformatted" "15 megabyte MMC," which means it had no clue where to even start on an NTSF file allocation protocol.

Forgive the technical language, above. When I'm under duress, I do the technology equivalent of speaking in tongues. While it might not lead me to salvation, at the very least, it keeps me from speaking in vulgarities about the state of my situation.


Dark Wraith
Professor, Writer, Photographer
See my Gallery

  

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Pocobear Registered since 09th Apr 2011Thu 19-May-11 12:12 PM
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#10. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 5


Mechanicsville, US
          

Just at note on format. The SDHC cards are formatted in FAT32 format, not NTFS. I checked both of my cards, Class 10 UDMA1 8gb Scandisk and class 10 16gb Lexar and both are formatted as FAT32. I have used Recuva software in the past and recovered all but 2 photo files from a Canon XTi camera, which acted a lot like yours did. The Scandisk software didn't see a thing. I know how it feels to lose photos. Best of luck

Visit my Nikonians gallery.


You don't take a photograph, you make it. -
Ansel Adams

The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance. -
Ansel Adams

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 19-May-11 01:49 PM
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#13. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 10


US
          

That's something that confuses me. Upon checking into the matter, I found out that you are right about the FAT32, but the reason FAT32 has gone out of style is that it cannot support file sizes larger than two gigabytes. (I remember that my old Windows XP machine couldn't handle videos I had recorded that were bigger than that.) Since I have not recently shot long, high-definition videos, I am wondering if the new video DSLR cameras break up the native files being built into smaller parts.

As another point, I originally wrote that the prevailing idea among some camera specialists is that the Nikon D7000 won't shoot high-def movies more than 20 minutes in length because of the possibility of over-heating the sensor. Now I'm wondering if the real reason is that a movie longer than that would be too large for a FAT32-format storage device.

I might have lost a whole lot of hugely important pictures a few nights ago, but I am most certainly gaining quite a bit of knowledge here at Nikonians in the aftermath. I almost wasn't going to post my original message, but now I'm glad I did.


Dark Wraith
Professor, Writer, Photographer
See my Gallery

  

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RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter MemberFri 20-May-11 01:56 PM
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#23. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 13
Fri 20-May-11 02:18 PM by briantilley

Monterey Bay, US
          


I use Sandisk 32GB cards in my D5100 & D7000.
I have an unused "FREE DOWNLOAD" for rescue pro recovery software.
The SDHC cards are FAT32.
The Video files average 3GB each.
As for the 20 minute limit, it has something to do with patents.
I push the record button at the end of 20 minutes two or three times
during a Sunday service and only lose about one second between.
The camera has never even gotten very warm.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Thu 19-May-11 12:17 PM
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#11. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 5


US
          

I've never had experience with the issue you describe so eloquently, but I DID loan my SanDisk recovery program disk to a friend who had accidentally formatted her card... ALL of the images were saved. The suggested approach is to leave the card in-camera, attach camera to the PC, and run the program.

If you need a copy of the Sandisk program, let me know.


Bill
billisabk@sbcglobal.net

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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dm1dave Administrator Awarded for high level knowledge and skills in various areas, most notably in Wildlife and Landscape Nikonian since 12th Sep 2006Thu 19-May-11 01:45 AM
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#3. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0


Lowden, US
          

Sorry to here this. I hope that you can get the camera back up and running.

Dave Summers
Lowden, Iowa
Nikonians Photo Contest Director

Nikonians membership -
"My most important photographic investment, after the camera"

My Nikonians Gallery | SummersPhotoGraphic.com
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Showcase your best work in any of our 7 Monthly Nikonians Photo contests.

Wildlife | Landscape | Macro | Sports | Travel | Underwater | Online Assignments| Best of 2014

  

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JPJ Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Aug 2009Thu 19-May-11 02:04 AM
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#4. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0


Toronto, CA
          

I am sorry you lost your photos, that is terrible.

I don't think either of the 2 things you mentioned should occur if the d7000 is working properly. I had my d7000 in the Dominican for a wedding and was shutter mashing numerous shots in sweltering heat with no issues (well except for the over heating sb900, but that is a known issue with the flash). On the wedding night I took over 500 shots. Further, I never turn my camera off to switch lenses, from the d40 to d90 and now d7000. I also use Patriot SD cards which are not exactly the quality of SanDisk.

I might just be very lucky, but it may also be that your particular d7000 has an issue. Might be worth having it checked.

Jason

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 19-May-11 02:15 AM
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#6. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 4


US
          

Your reply is hugely informative. I'm glad I've heard from someone who swaps lenses without turning off the camera, although that sound I heard when I did so was, in retrospect, not at all what I would consider healthy. It was something mechanical, and it wasn't graceful. Perhaps turning off the camera with a lens mounted muffles that sound, but I hadn't heard it ever before when turning off a Nikon DSLR.

Nevertheless, and again, I appreciate your reply, as well as all the others that are being posted.


Dark Wraith
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RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter MemberFri 20-May-11 02:01 PM
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#24. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 6
Fri 20-May-11 02:29 PM by RRRoger

Monterey Bay, US
          

>Your reply is hugely informative. I'm glad I've heard from
>someone who swaps lenses without turning off the camera,
>although that sound I heard when I did so was, in retrospect,
>not at all what I would consider healthy. It was something
>mechanical, and it wasn't graceful. Perhaps turning off the
>camera with a lens mounted muffles that sound, but I hadn't
>heard it ever before when turning off a Nikon DSLR.
>

>

Dark Wraith
>Professor, Writer, Photographer

Which lens did you have attached?
If non AF-S, perhaps you may have interrupted a screwdriver attachment at an opportune moment while the camera was focusing?

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jengo4 Registered since 20th May 2011Fri 20-May-11 03:31 PM
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#25. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 24


CH
          

Hi and sorry to hear about the data loss.
Just registered just to leave some more tips...

As an IT guy, I've already had success recovering data with these apps:
- Recuva from piriform, Win (as mentioned before)
- Data Rescue from prosofteng, Mac (now also available on Windows)

Worth a try:
- File Recovery 4 from pcinspector.de, Win

Just from experience (as mentioned before):
- I'd just use software that tries to only read and then recover, not to write anything on or repair the original card in any way. If you've got an ISO copy, of course go ahead with whatever helps.

Best luck!

  

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Covey22 Moderator Expert in various fields including aviation photography Awarded for his contributions to the Resources and The Nikonian eZine Charter MemberThu 19-May-11 03:09 AM
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#7. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

A card crash is one of the worst ways to lose images, especially when in the middle of a session. You have my sympathies.

Possibility 2 (more likely): Towards the end of the evening, the SB-600 speedlight I had on the D7000 was flagging severely, even though I had put in four brand new, top-of-the-line Energizer photo batteries right before the event. I decided to sit down and swap out the Nikkor AF-S 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 DX VRII I'd been using all evening and put on my Nikkor AF-S 50mm f1.4G. In my rush to get the faster lens on, I forgot to turn off the camera. As soon as I unlocked the telephoto lens from its mount, I heard what sounded like the shutter cutting out, and the camera turned off. It is possible that what happened at that instant was the equivalent of pulling a USB flash drive out of its port without electronically unmounting it, first. Although doing that won't necesarily destroy a flash device, it's a very bad thing to do, and in a camera, it might be a quick way to execute any removable media that might be in the way of an unchoreographed shutdown.

Generally speaking, it's untidy but not unsafe to remove any lens while the camera is still on. The sound you heard is likely the VR unit in the lens resetting itself to home position. I have used several VR lenses and have dismounted them accidentally while both camera and lens were on. In very rare cases, the camera goes into extremis as a result, but a simple flick of the ON-OFF switch cures it. There's additional aspects to the power-off that you should be aware of (see below).

The flash flagging isn't necessarily a sign of systems failure either - this is why pros invest in external power packs. In a flash-heavy shooting scenario, you cannot afford to have your refresh cycle lagging - so you power the Speedlight using heavy-duty and long-lasting sources - AAs just don't cut it. To be candid, four fresh batteries during a flash session is not even the minimum - I carry at least two extra sets in quick-access pockets on the holster bag and if my vehicle is nearby, a larger stash in the trunk in case it's really getting hot and heavy. A slow re-charging flash can also slow your camera's readiness, but it doesn't ever jeopardize the CF write process.

Finally, it was true of 1st generation models that I/O writes to the card would be put in jeopardy if power was cut. Nikon solved that and prevented a true power-off if a write-operation was still in progress and there were items in the buffer waiting to be written out. This was true as early as the D200, and is an inherited safety feature of the D7000 today.

Unfortunately, none of those aspects will help your current situation, but it's in your best interest to understand that everything you described can be attributed to operational norms of the camera. Your hardware (for the most part) is fine - it's behaving as expected.

There is a way to purge the buffer during a shut-down, and it's a trick that goes a few generational bodies back - if you hold down the trash/delete button while flicking the power switch off, the camera will dump the entire buffer rather than writing it to disk. Highly unlikely you were holding down that exact button combo at the time, but you should know about the possibility.

Good luck, and I hope you get as many images back as you can.

"Toodle-loo from Covey22!"

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vladman Registered since 25th Jun 2009Thu 19-May-11 10:07 AM
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#8. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 7


London, GB
          

I'm really sorry to hear about this misfortune you've suffered.

It might be worth investigating software called Spinrite. I offer no guarantees whatsoever that it will work, but I've heard good things about it.

The website is: www.grc.com/sr/spinrite.htm

Good luck!

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PAStime Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Feb 2009Thu 19-May-11 12:05 PM
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#9. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 8
Thu 19-May-11 12:08 PM by PAStime

Kingston, CA
          

Sorry to hear about the loss.

I wouldn't rush to declare the D7000 as not a pro camera (not that "pro" is defined anyway). If the lens removal led to the corrupt memory card, I can imagine that could happen on any camera, D3 included.

Pros have a second body slung around their neck. That's one reason why.

I have many times swapped lenses and then realized after or midway that the camera power is still on. Hate it when I do that.

I doubt very much that the camera over-heated the cards. The camera doesn't get that hot and the cards can withstand a lot more heat than the camera's sensor would ever generate (especially positioned some centimeters away). (I have experienced my D90 automatically shut down during video taking due to over heating - it said as much on the rear display).

After having tried everything possible with that corrupted card and having no success, consider quick formatting it (perhaps in the camera?) and then attempting a data recovery. Just a guess but that may render the card more usable (the index table remade sound) while leaving some images still recoverable.

Cheers,
Peter

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 19-May-11 01:39 PM
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#12. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 9


US
          

Thank you for that comment. I had seen the recommendation that I should try quick formatting the camera, and I thought that was simply unthinkable because it would destroy the file allocation table. Now that you have mentioned it again, though, I have reconsidered and realized that the file allocation table is already gone, so it probably wouldn't hurt to try that route. I think I'll postpone the quick format until I've tried a few more rescue programs, but it is now on my list of approaches I will try, thanks to your advice.


Dark Wraith
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DeanAZ Moderator Expert nature photographer Nikonian since 28th Apr 2007Thu 19-May-11 03:11 PM
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#14. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 12


Phoenix, US
          

I'm sorry about your troubles but a point about the sound you heard, if you were in live view mode when you removed the lens the mirror will drop out of lock up and live view mode will be cancelled.

If you had no pictures on the smaller card, you could try reformatting that one in camera as a test. I say this because you had said that when you tried to swap the cards it would not let you write to that card either. If you had not been using the card (backup/raw-jpeg/video) then it may have been empty and there would be nothing to lose in the attempt. Did you say if you had been using slot 2 during this event?

Dean
Phoenix, Arizona USA
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Robman3 Gold Member Nikonian since 12th Apr 2010Thu 19-May-11 04:37 PM
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#15. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0


West of Santa Monica, US
          

Wow, not fun!

Question, as stated once below, were you using both cards? If so, are you set up for NEF's on #1 and JPEGS/h.264 on #2?

Thanks,

Rob

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swaussie Silver Member Nikonian since 13th Oct 2007Thu 19-May-11 07:19 PM
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#16. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 15
Thu 19-May-11 07:28 PM by swaussie

Unteraegeri, CH
          

Being in the IT industy and having had to recover lost data from hard drives before, I can recommend "getdataback" from runtime.org. I will admit I have never used it on SD cards so your milage may vary.

I dont see why formatting the card would help, it sounds as if the file allocation table is corrupt and this wont make your data suddenly readable.

The good news would be that the data is still on the cards in bits and bytes and can still be recovered, the bad news is if something did corrupt the cards themselves and hence the data on them. Whatever you do, dont copy ANYTHING to the cards themselves, this could overwrite the data on them!

If the data is seriously of value, you might want to speak to a police forensics unit - they might be able to assist as they are experts in recovering data!

I truly wish you the best of luck.

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 19-May-11 08:07 PM
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#17. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 15


US
          

In retrospect, my choice for the card in Slot 2 was not the best; I was using it as the overflow from Slot 1. It occurs to me now that I was plowing with a 32 Gb Class 10 card in Slot 1, so I doubt if there was any way whatsoever of overrunning that card with photos or even video.

What I should have done was allocate the card in Slot 2 to JPEG versions of the RAW files that were being saved on the burly card in Slot 1.

But, no.

Grr.


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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Fri 20-May-11 01:37 AM
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#18. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 17


Novi, US
          

Overflow was a very reasonable choice for slot 2, so I wouldn't beat yourself up over that.

All cameras can fail, pro or not. Too bad it was on something so important.

I can see how a Quickf ormat could make the card available to be recovered by something like RescuePro. It would certainly be my last resort, but at the end of the day, I wouldn't be surprised if that worked.

Mike

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Fri 20-May-11 02:00 AM
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#19. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 18


US
          

I have an alternative for trying the quick format and several other approaches. I'm going to make an ISO image of the card. I'll create a partition on one of my backup drives, then produce the image there to create something more or less equivalent to a virtual representation of what (if anything) is on the physical card. I can then try a couple of different methods for recovery that had failed on the card, itself.

It's a long shot, but I can do a lot more knowing that the card is no longer in danger of being made worse off by what I'm going to try.


Dark Wraith
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PAStime Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Feb 2009Fri 20-May-11 02:27 AM
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#20. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 19


Kingston, CA
          

Interesting plan! Do let us know how it goes, thanks, Peter

  

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Robman3 Gold Member Nikonian since 12th Apr 2010Fri 20-May-11 07:11 AM
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#21. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 17
Fri 20-May-11 07:14 AM by Robman3

West of Santa Monica, US
          

Again, what a drag,

Were you shooting NEF and JPEG's then?

Matched cards, I try for that always unless the front card (NEF's gets full which has happened), of course no one needs to lay that out now.

Class 10's because you can, and should you shoot Video, then the U1 types, which may be overkill, however, here we are all discussing cards and yes, possibly the bursts collided and locked it up.

Like a bad sector on a HDD, doesn't mean one cannot retrieve, just a PITA.

Just precaution, up front.

The ISO file sounds like a good approach.

Good luck,

Rob

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Pocobear Registered since 09th Apr 2011Fri 20-May-11 12:50 PM
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#22. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 21


Mechanicsville, US
          

Another last resort idea. With the card in a card reader, goto Windows Explorer > Select drive > Properties > Tools tab > Error checking > Check now.. and select both options and let it try to repair the card that way.

Good Luck

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You don't take a photograph, you make it. -
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The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance. -
Ansel Adams

  

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SnapSnapSnap Registered since 08th Nov 2010Fri 20-May-11 05:58 PM
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#26. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 22


US
          

I have had issues with the sb600 keeping up with my d7000. In fact, I melted two sb600s one day after the other at fashion shoots.

I switched to sb700 due to the overheating issue. When the sb700 heats up it slows down to limit overheating. I have had it shutoff at a recent fashion show due to my shutter happy finger... and I removed the flash, opened the pop up and kept going... just remember to remove the lens hood or you will have a semi-circle shadow in most pictures. The perfect flash for high speed shooting is the Quantum and it will set you back more than buying a second d7000.

I did not see anyone mention why I don't leave the camera on when I swap lenses, the charged sensor will draw in dust during lens changes.

This thread did bring up a number of great tips for dealing with various issues but it doesn't mean the camera can't keep up or isn't professional. The buffer size is smaller than on the "true" professional cameras and the weather sealing is not as robust... but it offers the highest level of professional features in a consumer priced model.

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Sat 21-May-11 01:23 AM
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#27. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 26


US
          

I am sincerely grateful for all of the messages replying to the original post of this thread. After trying no fewer than eight recovery utilities, none of which worked, and several different old-style approaches from the Dark Ages of computers, I have given up.

No, I did not take the SDHC card out to a field and shoot it; instead, I packaged it up and sent it to the SanDisk third-party recovery company, which is called LC Technologies. They will charge me a whopping $275 if they can recover the files on the corrupted card. Under normal circumstances, I would never go for a deal like that, but the photographs on that disk are worth that otherwise head-banging price.

Truth be told, I strongly suspect the files are irretrievable, but we shall see. I will post one last message to this thread when I hear from LC Technologies, which should be in about a week or so.

On the larger topic of the Nikon D7000, it is, indeed, an amazing piece of equipment, but a fine camera is only as good for professional work as the photographer who creates works of art with it. That includes a persistent willingness to learn and always abide by best practices. I now know a few of those best practices that only bad experiences can teach.

Again, I thank all of you and invite you, if you haven't already done so, to see what I do with a Nikon D7000: Abandoned Landscapes. It is because of the potential for photography like this that I won't give up on what is one of the best Nikon cameras ever.


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jengo4 Registered since 20th May 2011Sat 21-May-11 08:24 AM
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#28. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 27
Sat 21-May-11 08:27 AM by jengo4

CH
          

All the luck with the ongoing recovery process you go through, even after having tried eight (!) recovery utilities - wow!

I've just seen your movie Abandoned Landscape, transports mood well, very inspiring!

The case on topic is, indeed, a VERY unfortunate one, as you were using one of the best camera together with one of the best SD card available today.

As it still could be a D7000 issue, or one of your specific cam, I'd consider having the cam checked (as Jason mentioned), or let Nikon know about the case in some way.

At the least, thank you for posting this story, as it helps me not trusting my much beloved D7000 too much, and finally using the second card as backup. This option is supposed to seriously prevent such a case, well, possibly?

  

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BulliTT597 Registered since 27th Jul 2011Sat 30-Jul-11 01:09 AM
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#93. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 26


US
          

and doesn't it have a higher pixel count, and a few features the older "pro's" don't have?

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Tue 24-May-11 06:23 PM
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#29. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0
Tue 24-May-11 06:24 PM by Dark Wraith

US
          

This is an update to my post that started this thread. Last Saturday, I sent the failed Sandisk 32Gb Class 10 card to LC Technologies, which specializes in data recovery from corrupted Sandisk cards.

Today, I got the following e-mail message from Ray at LCT:

"I wanted to let you know the memory card is a counterfeit. It is not a Sandisk brand. This can make recovery a bit more difficult. I will keep you posted."

That's right, it's a knock-off. What makes the ones I got from an "authorized Sandisk reseller" special is that mine looked exactly like Sandisks: whereas most of the knock-offs coming out of China have only some of the same markings as real Sandisks, mine had everything the same. Fonts, color schemes, logo -- everything like genuine Sandisk (at least as far as I could tell).

Grr.

I shall provide a subsequent update concerning the recovery of the files on that phony card.

(By the way, I just ordered two Sandisk 8Gb U1 cards from Amazon, which, I hope, is selling the real deals. The Nikon D7000 is one of the very few DSLRs that can use these high-speed beauties, and the price was only about $35 each at the time of my order. I have a sense that the price might go up when demand for them increases, but I don't know that for sure.)


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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Tue 24-May-11 07:00 PM
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#30. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 29


Novi, US
          

How awful.

Who did you buy them from (so we can avoid the same problem).

Mike

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Tue 24-May-11 07:32 PM
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#32. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 30


US
          

I'm going to do some investigative work on the reseller, who is plying his stuff off eBay and other sites. Somehow, he's getting top-notch ratings, which leads me to think he's a "multiple merch," someone who sets up many accounts to transact with himself to boost his ratings. Also, because his cards don't fail right away, I am sure others are rating him highly before their cards fail.

I assume LC Technologies will be passing the information about the knock-off along to Sandisk, but I will see what their intention is in this matter and let Sandisk have first shot if it so chooses, which it might or might not depending upon whether the corporation determines that the damage to its reputation from failing products is greater than the cost of actually hunting down the chain of distribution responsible.


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Pocobear Registered since 09th Apr 2011Tue 24-May-11 07:02 PM
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#31. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 29


Mechanicsville, US
          

I just read that at least 30% of all Scandisk cards are counterfeit, but from the pictures they posted, some had really bad artwork, but some had very good artwork. What I have always wondered is why, if your going to counterfeit some thing, why not at least copy the artwork and container exactly like the original. Like their going to sue and jail you for the artwork and not for copying the device???
Aw, the crazy world we live in.

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Tue 24-May-11 07:47 PM
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#33. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 31


US
          

I just had another conversation with the fellow at LC Technologies. He said the head of their tech group has been communicating with Sandisk, and it appears that Sandisk is now interested in the whole knock-off problem enough that they might want me to pass some information along about what happened.

I asked the LC Technologies gentleman for a protocol to establish authenticity of a card, and he told me that there is no electronic way to do it; instead, you have to look carefully at everything about the card, comparing it to one that you know to be genuine. According to him, I was way wrong in my claim that the knock-offs of mine looked just like real Sandisk cards. In fact, the 32Gb phony was a really weird deal: it was a knock-off 8Gb micro card that had been sealed inside a phony 32Gb shell. (Apparently, the knock-off boyz at the hack factory are into Inception.)

One last point I should make that the LCT guy mentioned. I said that I was going to buy cards only from Amazon to make sure I was purchasing authentic product, and he said something that led me to believe that, because Amazon is a pass-through merchant, it had unknowingly sold counterfeits.

So, there we are.

Life was easier with my F3. Life was also easier before computers, I suppose.


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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Tue 24-May-11 08:45 PM
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#34. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 33


Novi, US
          

Well, some things you buy directly from Amazon and some things you buy on Amazon from others. The information is pretty clear on their site who you are buying from.

But now I'm worried about the three 32GB cards I bought from Amazon and that I am taking to Italy. I guess the first thing I am going to do is put them in my reader and validate that they really are 32GB.

Secondly, my cards came with a license key for Rescue Pro. I went to the Sandisk website and had to enter the key in order to register and then download and unlock the software. I wonder if that proves anything?

Mike

  

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Bob Chadwick Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Jan 2006Tue 24-May-11 08:56 PM
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#35. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 34


Norcross, US
          

The whole card buying prcess is frustrating. Sandisk has four or five CF cards on their web site, yet when you do a search on Amazon there are a ton of others with the Sandisk logo. At first I thought they were just older versions, now I wonder if they are counterfeit.

Visit
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NorcrossPics.Com

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BulliTT597 Registered since 27th Jul 2011Sat 30-Jul-11 01:14 AM
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#94. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 35


US
          

>The whole card buying prcess is frustrating. Sandisk has
>four or five CF cards on their web site, yet when you do a
>search on Amazon there are a ton of others with the Sandisk
>logo. At first I thought they were just older versions, now I
>wonder if they are counterfeit.


I buy all my cards at retail outlets, i don't trust any online sellers as they might not know there fake or cheap, sadly i see a lot of "size differences " where the card appears to be say a 32, and works OK for a little while, but sure enough they eventually start to break down, the info gets garbled, the the real size comes to light, best buy for me, yeah i know its more $$$ but what you gonna do? at least there, 45 days later you can return it

  

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KurtP Gold Member Nikonian since 01st Jan 2013Mon 11-Feb-13 03:04 AM
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#98. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 94


Quesnel, CA
          

I have found this thread very informative. I bought two Sandisk 16GB Extreme Pro from a retail outlet in fact the same one I bought my D7000 from. I check my cards to see whether their was anything amiss that I could see and noticed that both cards are made in China. They seem authentic and have worked fine. I didn't realize I could or should have registered them.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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KenLPhotos Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Jul 2009Tue 07-Jun-11 02:00 PM
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#72. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 34
Tue 07-Jun-11 02:08 PM by KenLPhotos

Stewartstown, US
          

>>With as many Sandisk SDHC cards as I have bought, you would think that I could find one of those little CDs they always used to include, but I can't.
>>It turns out that Sandisk now seems to be outsourcing their recovery program to another company. I went to that company's Website and got the
>>demo version of the recovery program, which required that I give them my phone number, which they promptly used to call me to market the upgrade
>>to the full version.

Do you suppose that asking for your phone number was a give-away???
Serial number or some other ID is more usual for companies to have to help a customer.

KenL

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



There are many 'images of beautiful objects' but few 'beautiful images of objects'.

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Tue 07-Jun-11 02:38 PM
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#73. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 72


US
          

I have found that LC Technologies, although quite dedicated to their data recovery work, has too much of an interest in getting personal information. I just purchased a Sandisk Extreme Pro 16Gb UHS-1 SDHC card (they're going right now for about $65 new), and it came with a free, one-year subscription to RescuePro 3.5. When I went to the Webpage to get the activation code, it was an LC Technologies site, and I was required not only to provide a telephone number, but also a full mailing address.

This unwarranted demand for personal information is, of course, supported by Sandisk, which provided the representation of the free software, and Sandisk might want to consider its vicarious liability as "respondeat superior" should LC Technologies either deliberately use such personal information abusively or suffer a security breach allowing that information to be obtained by third parties.

In an earlier time, I would have been appalled by the behavior of Sandisk with respect to ensuring the privacy of its customers; these days, however, I just remind myself that it is now the 21st Century, and the term "privacy" is one of those colloquialisms from a by-gone era.


Dark Wraith
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Covey22 Moderator Expert in various fields including aviation photography Awarded for his contributions to the Resources and The Nikonian eZine Charter MemberTue 24-May-11 09:18 PM
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#36. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 33
Tue 24-May-11 09:21 PM by Covey22

US
          

In fact, the 32Gb phony was a really weird deal: it was a knock-off 8Gb micro card that had been sealed inside a phony 32Gb shell.

That's actually an old trick. This scam is insult on top of injury. The creators of this piece of work have chutzpah as the old folks would say.

It's painfully obvious now, but reliable retailers are the only way to go for most hardware, especially if it's mission critical. This is the only way the buyer can be guaranteed a means of recourse.

"Toodle-loo from Covey22!"

-Armando
Nikonians Team
Nikonians News - Fresh Everyday!

The Covey Blog!

My Plan:

Get out of the car.
Get closer to the subject.
Pick the right mid-tone this time.

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Tue 24-May-11 09:58 PM
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#37. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 33


US
          

Continuing this tedious tale, I received an e-mail message from a gentleman who is a manager in Technical Support at SanDisk Corporation's Global Customer Support group. He requested specific information about the seller and details of the transaction by which I acquired the knock-off merchandise. LC Technologies had already sent him photographs of the phony card. I gather that the first order of business for Sandisk is to have eBay shut down the seller.

I sent the details of the transaction, including screen captures of the eBay Web page where the cards were being sold. In a subsequent message, the gentleman at Sandisk sent me a letter I can use to request a refund from eBay. That was quite gracious, but I probably won't try to get my money back, given the litany of stories I've heard about PayPal's refund obfuscation routine (which is actually part of the company's successful business model, but that's another story).

When I get that knock-off card back, I'll post a picture of it here so everyone can see what the phony thing looks like. Until then, feel free to continue this conversation with me if you so choose.


Dark Wraith
Professor, Writer, Photographer
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PAStime Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Feb 2009Tue 24-May-11 11:14 PM
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#38. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 37


Kingston, CA
          

Fascinating story. I wonder how much Sandisk is reasonably able to do about this. Peter

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Tue 24-May-11 11:42 PM
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#39. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 38
Tue 24-May-11 11:47 PM by Dark Wraith

US
          

That would depend upon how much Sandisk is willing to do. There are consulting firms that specialize in matters involving international trade and counterfeit suppression. You might even have heard some of the names of these firms or their parent companies.

In one case, a company in the United States got a hybrid team comprising the FBI and other agencies to retrieve stolen software that has subsequently proved to be worth billions of dollars in revenue to the company.

While that case involved a U.S. firm with deep and powerful ties in Washington, other companies without such recourse can still, at least sometimes, get problems under some semblance of control. In many cases, this involves legal means; in other cases, it involves extra-legal methods. The cost can be very high, but rest assured that when huge revenue losses could result from counterfeiting, theft, and other corporate intrigue, a market for security services will exist, and there will be plenty of specialists who will provide solutions.

Now, if anyone wants to have some fun, let's try a couple of questions. I mentioned a company that got a special U.S. government law enforcement team to do a retrieval on foreign soil of its software, which might sound all well and good unless you have some serious understanding about that software.

Question #1: What was the company?

Question #2: What was the software that was so important?

Question #3: What exactly does this software do?

(Note about #3: If you don't know about this proprietary software, I'll bet you wouldn't believe me if I told you what it does... day after day, week after week, month after month, to make this company considerably more profitable than its competitors.)


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Mike55Y Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jun 2006Wed 25-May-11 05:31 PM
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#40. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 39


Hillsborough, US
          

My experience has been that formatting the card in the camera does not wipe out any of the picture files. Formatting a second time does. I have recovered all of the pictures after doing a single format. I also recall seeing this confirmed somewhere on this forum. To be sure I was using a CF card in a D300, but it's likely the same.

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Wed 25-May-11 06:08 PM
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#41. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 39


Paignton, GB
          

>Now, if anyone wants to have some fun, let's try a couple of
>questions...

This has been an interesting and instructive discussion, but let's not stray too far from the subject of this Forum - the D7000 - please.

Thank you

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Wed 25-May-11 07:59 PM
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#42. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 41


US
          

Right you are. This thread can slip away quietly as soon as I post a picture of the card, along with any last information Sandisk wants to provide.


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PAStime Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Feb 2009Thu 26-May-11 02:28 AM
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#43. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 42


Kingston, CA
          

>Right you are. This thread can slip away quietly as soon as I
>post a picture of the card, along with any last information
>Sandisk wants to provide.

But do let us know how the data recovery goes!

Peter

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Thu 26-May-11 12:13 PM
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#47. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 43


US
          


>But do let us know how the data recovery goes!
>
>Peter

Yes, and you may wish to make amends to your D7000 for initially thinking she had done the damage. I think a new lens would be in order.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 26-May-11 01:36 PM
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#48. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 47


US
          

A workhorse AF-S Nikkor 18-200mm f3.5-5.6GII and a gorgeous AF-S Nikkor 50mm f1.4G suit my current needs well. I should note that an SB-700 would be nice, but that's just because I don't like swinging between under-flash and nuking my subjects like I do too often with that SB-600. It's a personal thing.

I should stipulate that the Nikon D7000 is the best camera on the market in the prosumer class, notwithstanding the constant ramp of new offerings by Canon, which seems to come out with a higher mega-pixel version of its Txi series every year. Canon is a fine company, and anyone who wants a prosumer camera should consider a T3i, especially if Disney colors and green tints are desirable.

The D7000 is not a professional camera; but neither is any other camera in the hands of a photographer who is not a professional. What I did constituted unprofessional practice: I did not pay attention to detail in the technical, front-end of work flow. The cost of my lack of professionalism was the loss of irreplaceable photographs for many people who were counting on me.

Yes, the SDHC card was a counterfeit, but that was not the reason I failed. Our culture has gone too far in looking to the failure of others--from teachers in education to politicians in fiscal matters--for the reasons we now look forward to a degraded future, when the first and last place to look is at what we, ourselves, in our individual lives have chosen to do.

My Pennsylvania Dutch ancestors said it well: when you go out into the world, you should always be careful; the world is full of Englishmen.

As it turns out, it's also full of Chinese counterfeiting shops.


(With apologies for once again being somewhat off-topic, but that's my way: all stories are connected in the on-going novel of life.)


Dark Wraith
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Robman3 Gold Member Nikonian since 12th Apr 2010Thu 26-May-11 07:48 AM
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#45. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 33


West of Santa Monica, US
          

What a scam, yikes, that is (------) crazy.

No wonder it crashed, was the card inside a class 4?

Very sorry once again, hope they can master the disaster.

Rob

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 26-May-11 11:27 AM
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#46. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 45


US
          

It was inside a Class 10. Paying for an authentic Sandisk 32Gb Class 10 SDHC and ending up with a knock-off micro 8Gb Class Whatever inside a counterfeit 32Gb card is two layers of duplicity on the part of the hack shop that's building these, and hearing from the data recovery expert that maybe 30 percent of the Sandisk cards out there are phonies is really worrisome.


Dark Wraith
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skibbyshot Silver Member Nikonian since 25th Apr 2006Thu 26-May-11 02:03 PM
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#49. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 46


Little Falls, US
          

Awful story. I for one, have no suggestions about the data recovery. In the past, two friends with different cameras asked me how to retrieve photos from cards that weere 1) accidentally "erased or deleted" and 2) the 1 GB micro drive had apparently failed. Both had succcessful recoveries at a local Nikon camera shop that I recommended them to.

Last point on the cards - maybe buy htme from someone like B&H Photo, Adorama, etc. Whom sell directly after purchasing from maunfacturers (my theory at least!)

Now the D7000 - is it working? After your event, is the camera broken/dead/non-functional? Just curious.

Great write up and sugestions from all of the above. Still rooting for you!

  

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Robman3 Gold Member Nikonian since 12th Apr 2010Fri 27-May-11 07:21 AM
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#50. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 46


West of Santa Monica, US
          

Keep us up on the recovery, sorry once again.

Rob

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Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Carvalho Mourao Registered since 28th May 2011Sat 28-May-11 01:54 AM
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#51. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 46


BR
          

Hello,

I read the whole thread hoping that you'd post an update with the pictures (the counterfeit discussion is important, but not at all when compared to the lost pictures part).

I just want to wish you good luck

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Sat 28-May-11 02:37 AM
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#52. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 51


US
          

When I get the counterfeit card back, which will probably be on Tuesday, I shall post a picture of what it looks like. My pictures were all lost. Nothing was on the phony card.

On the bright side, I bought two Sandisk 8Gb U1 cards on Amazon.com for about $35 each, and I got them yesterday. When I put them in the Nikon D7000, they went right to work like champions. (The card in Slot 2 is now set as straight backup for the Slot 1 card.)

I even ran a burst of multiple, rapid-succession pictures to try to overrun the D7000. I couldn't. I had read that the U1 cards are able to do some magic to keep the shots going without any lag, but I don't know if that's what was happening.

This thread will end (mercifully) next Tuesday with pictures of the counterfeit trash, and if I get any follow up from Sandisk about what the company is doing to the twit who sold me the phony stuff, I'll let readers know about that, too; I doubt, however, that they will share their ways and means with me. That's just as well. I've never been much for seeing large firepower being brought to bear on small objects. (It's not so much the carnage, mind you; it's just the acrid aroma of over-cooked meat I don't like.)


Dark Wraith
Professor, Writer, Photographer
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Robman3 Gold Member Nikonian since 12th Apr 2010Sun 29-May-11 07:32 AM
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#54. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 52


West of Santa Monica, US
          

The overload per grain, smells like to much powder was used.

It's fitting however.

Rob

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gladstone03 Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Feb 2011Fri 17-Jun-11 12:21 AM
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#86. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)I"
In response to Reply # 46


Lake Ridge, US
          

I read that this scam is common. It is recommended that after receiving new cards, format them, and then write data to the card. So if you have a 32gb card and it formats to ~30gb, then write at least 25gb data to the card. What happens is when you format the card, the card shows up as 32gb but if it is really an 8gb card, once you go to write beyond the 8gb, then the card will fail as your did.

Gary

>It was inside a Class 10. Paying for an authentic
>Sandisk 32Gb Class 10 SDHC and ending up with a knock-off
>micro 8Gb Class Whatever inside a counterfeit 32Gb card is two
>layers of duplicity on the part of the hack shop that's
>building these, and hearing from the data recovery expert that
>maybe 30 percent of the Sandisk cards out there are phonies is
>really worrisome.
>
>
>

Dark Wraith
>Professor, Writer, Photographer
>See
>my Gallery>


Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Robman3 Gold Member Nikonian since 12th Apr 2010Thu 26-May-11 07:44 AM
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#44. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 29


West of Santa Monica, US
          

U1 prices should be heading down by now.

Good luck,

Rob

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Sat 28-May-11 01:42 PM
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#53. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 44


US
          

I wonder if camera manufacturers and memory providers could enter an agreement where bona-fide cards have embedded encoding, read by the recording device (in this case a D7000) and potentially rejected if a counterfeit card is used?

I realize only new cards could have this (unless Sandisk have already encoded their cards). But you could also have an on-camera over-ride for known bona-fide memory cards.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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NASattack Silver Member Nikonian since 13th Feb 2008Tue 31-May-11 07:00 PM
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#55. "UPDATE: RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 53
Tue 31-May-11 07:20 PM by NASattack

Dartford, GB
          

I can't recommend buying memory cards from anywhere other than a recognised photographic dealer.Same goes for batteries.

Steve.

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Wed 01-Jun-11 01:08 AM
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#56. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Finally, as promised, I am herewith publishing photographs of the counterfeit Sandisk 32Gb SDHC Class 10 card that motivated me to begin this thread here in the Nikonians D7000 forum. I just received this phony card back from LC Technologies, which determined that the data on it was unrecoverable, and that the Sandisk 32Gb SDHC Class 10 card you see here was a counterfeit 8Gb micro card embedded in a knock-off Sandisk 32Gb case.

This first photograph is pretty much what the card looked like when I received it "new" from a dealer representing that he was selling authentic Sandisk cards.

http://alancring.com/offgallery/PhonyCard0.jpg

The second photograph, below, is a close-up of the card, which got scratched up quite a bit during the attempt by the recovery company to get the data off it by dismantling the case. Note that the shiny parts at the top left are the camera light catching the hologram, which was part of what made the card look authentic.

http://alancring.com/offgallery/PhonyCard1.jpg

The third and last photograph is the inside of the card. LC Technologies did not put the card back together, but instead left the pieces inside the clear case underneath the outside front of the card.

http://alancring.com/offgallery/PhonyCard2.jpg

So, there it is: that's what I thought was a real Sandisk card, only to find out in a disastrous way that it was a counterfeit.

I shall leave it to you to decide whether the card I saw and trusted to put in a Nikon D7000 looked like it was authentic, and I am publishing these photographs so you can use them as a guide for one of what might be many counterfeit Sandisk cards out there.


Dark Wraith
Professor, Writer, Photographer
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rbsandor Gold Member Nikonian since 29th Aug 2007Wed 01-Jun-11 02:05 AM
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#57. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 56


Denver, US
          

I'm sorry to hear about your loss of data, but given eBay's reputation, what was your motivation for buying a critical item through eBay?

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Wed 01-Jun-11 02:47 AM
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#58. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 57


US
          

That would be the same motivation of millions of other business and individual purchasers who buy there: as fraught with opportunities for fraud as eBay and similar sites might be, a dealer rating system of the same kind does not exist in the brick-and-mortar world. Insofar as online merchants are concerned, according to the data recovery company I used, counterfeit Sandisk cards were sold through Amazon.com. Both Amazon.com and eBay assure that it is not their respective companies, but instead disreputable merchants who are at fault. Notwithstanding that shared and inevitable denial of liability, real people are hurt, and just compensation in our Anglo-Saxon legal heritage amounts only to money, which is truly irrelevant when a harm is irreparable.

Unless I can buy direct from a manufacturer whose products I want and trust, I am at peril in any transaction. Over the course of my unfortunately long and lengthening life, I have bought catastrophically bad products made by highly reputable companies and sold through highly reputable retailers (an HP laptop bought at Best Buy comes to mind right away).

Here's my admittedly folly-riddled understanding. Most people have high and good ideals and strive to a greater or lesser extent to live their lives to some semblance of the calling of those better angels. We are all, of course, hypocrites, and we face a persistent, almost impossible-to-close chasm between the desired and the desirable in ourselves; but that is insufficient for us to dispense with all hope for ourselves or those around us.

That having been noted, the world is also way too generously endowed with truly cruel, vicious, unconscionably awful people, as well. They tend to be successful, and their mendacity is quite difficult to dismiss, especially when we try to teach our young about the consequences of rightful and wrongful actions.

Whether I purchase from what I deem by ratings a reliable merchant on eBay or because of what I hear from a massive public relations department of Amazon.com, I am at peril of dealing with a seller that could be successful because of mendacity as much as business acumen.

Ultimately, as I noted in another post on this thread, the failure of a product is my failure, at once because I made a choice and because I made that choice knowing the landscape of merchants in a system that teeters in the dark land between humanity and its cruel heart whose name is capitalism.

I lost a round in that continuing story. That means I'll be better in the next round.


Dark Wraith
Professor, Writer, Photographer
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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Wed 01-Jun-11 03:19 AM
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#59. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 58


US
          

This has been an informative thread...

Frankly, I'd have had no idea that the card you purchased was bogus.

Much as I'd like encoding in cards, readable by the devices they're used in, might it also be a good idea for Sandisk (and others) to issue a free utility for buyers to determine bona-fide cards?

Simple solution for what can be a huge problem.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Wed 01-Jun-11 03:50 AM
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#60. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 59


US
          

I asked that specific question, among others, of the man with whom I spoke at LC Technologies. He deferred an answer, but I can tell you this much: electronic authentication would be great. An industry-wide standard for authenticating the manufacturer would be fine, too, so we could tell that a Kingston was a Kingston, a Lexar was a Lexar, and a Sandisk was a Sandisk. However, such a standard would have to be open for use by manufacturers that were not as well known; to do otherwise would constitute an unfair restraint of trade. While antitrust laws are obsolete and widely unenforced anymore, that could change in the future. Moreover, an industry group acting as a gatekeeper on which manufacturers could use the authentication system could end up in legal trouble not just because of restraint-of-trade allegations, but also because of violations of international trade agreements if it were deemed that, for example, Chinese manufacturers of SDHC and CF cards were being excluded at a higher rate than were American, Japanese, and Taiwanese manufacturers. Worse yet, a manufacturer in, say, China could produce a perfectly legitimate line of low-end cards and also run a hack shop for counterfeits. That would mean the manufacturer would have the basic authentication code and then the means and motivation to hack it for use in its counterfeiting operation.

Security systems are always vulnerable (as the LulzSec party boyz are showing companies from Sony to Lockheed Martin, these days).

This is not to say electronic card authentication won't happen, but it will be awhile before the costs of doing it (including legal costs) outweigh the challenges and the losses from counterfeits. We aren't there yet, but writing this long thread is part of the process of making the public aware that a problem exists, and that's an important, albeit early, step in getting the manufacturers moving in the right direction.


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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Wed 01-Jun-11 04:12 AM
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#62. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 60


US
          

>This is not to say electronic card authentication won't
>happen, but it will be awhile before the costs of doing it
>(including legal costs) outweigh the challenges and the losses
>from counterfeits.

With huge respect to your longer post, surely Sandisk can offer it's own utility, for its own purchasers, to quickly and easily confirm its own cards are bona-fide.

No legal issues involved...

If they can issue RescuePro3.2, they can issue BonaFide1.0.

I'm not knocking SanDisk, just looking for easily established confidence that I won't experience what you did.

BTW, you have boatloads more insight than 99% of the world, and you were fooled.

Sandisk can easily assure everyone that cards with their name are the real deal.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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rbsandor Gold Member Nikonian since 29th Aug 2007Wed 01-Jun-11 03:57 AM
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#61. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 58
Wed 01-Jun-11 04:14 AM by rbsandor

Denver, US
          

It is not a fault of capitalism. It is a fault of disreputable people. Dishonesty is not the sole purview of capitalism. There are liars and cheats in all walks of life.

  

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NASattack Silver Member Nikonian since 13th Feb 2008Wed 01-Jun-11 04:40 AM
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#63. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 61


Dartford, GB
          

Here is a link from Sandisk as to "where to buy".

http://www.sandisk.com/sandisk-support/where-to-buy

Steve.

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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Wed 01-Jun-11 09:55 AM
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#65. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 63


Novi, US
          

Interesting that Amazon isn't on the list of online sellers.

Mike

  

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gdhawkins Silver Member Nikonian since 04th Jun 2006Wed 01-Jun-11 05:29 PM
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#68. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 65


Reading, GB
          

Mike

Amazon UK is listed as one of the sites approved by San Disk in the UK

I have bought 4 16GB SanDisk 45 MBs SDHC cards and so far have had no problems.

Geoff

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Robman3 Gold Member Nikonian since 12th Apr 2010Wed 01-Jun-11 06:08 AM
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#64. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 56


West of Santa Monica, US
          

The label is ever so slightly on crooked, but one would never take as much time as we here to scrutinize after you tale of woe.

Rob

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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Wed 01-Jun-11 09:59 AM
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#66. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 64


Novi, US
          

So my cards came from Amazon but a company called Komputerbay. I am now worried and trying to figure out how I ascertain their authenticity other than looking at the label. While my 16GB SanDisk Extreme cards cost a respectable $50, that isn't a guarantee. Yikes!

Mike

  

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RRRoger Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his long history of demonstrated excellence and helping other members with equipment, technique and DSLR video in the true Nikonians spirit. Charter MemberWed 01-Jun-11 12:18 PM
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#67. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 66


Monterey Bay, US
          

I have a pile of SanDisk cards.
They all work extremely well.
That is proof enough for me.
If the new 32GB SanDisk 45 MBs SDHC card does not work as good, I will send it back to Amazon.

By the way, although headquartered in Milpitas California, the cards say made in China on the back.

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chroaz Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Apr 2009Wed 01-Jun-11 10:39 PM
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#69. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 67


Cave Creek, US
          

I apologize if I have missed it in this very interesting and unfortunate thread, but how much below the price at say Adorama or B&H was the Sandisk card you bought on e-bay - might that "discount", if there was one, have been an indication of a potential problem?

Thanks for sharing this experience.

Chris

When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.
- Ansel Adams

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Thu 02-Jun-11 12:00 AM
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#70. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 69


US
          

This response will begin tamely enough, but I must caution that you should stop somewhere after about the first or second paragraph because, otherwise, you will be dragged to a grim vortex that crosses into such an unholy tedium as international economics. If you don't want to go down that terrible path to madness, stop below while your soul is still good.

Adorama is selling this card for about $96, and I won the auction at a net cost of about $76 if I recall correctly. That was, a couple months ago, within the range of prices at auction for this particular size and class of Sandisk card (on the low side, but I stop bidding at any auction for any product if the bidding gets within about 10 percent of new price). With Sandisk cards, I used to get them in auctions and local offers by people (usually students) who got a rebate by cutting out the UPC label on the box, so somewhat below-retail prices for certain electronics are not all that unusual in my purchasing experience. I got my Canon Pro9000 Mark II printer by buying a UPC cutout version. I must note that, as a general rule, the UPC label being cut out was my indication that the product was, indeed, legitimate and also not hot merchandise. To be perfectly honest, I had seen some low closing prices at auctions for Sandisk cards and thought that some post-rebate merchandise was passing through the market, as it had from time to time in the past. Less than a week before, I had missed the close of an auction at which a Sandisk 32Gb Class 10 card had been won for $70 or so.

Correlating with these shards of information, I was seeing the prices of Sandisk cards being sold by highly rated Chinese eBay merchants going up dramatically, largely as a result of the initial phases of the collapse of the years-long exchange rate pegging the People's Bank of China had been running for the yuan against the American dollar. That gave me the impression that anything coming out of China would be priced higher than domestic equivalents.

Although I do not yet know the details of how it is working, some places in China are still able to sell their exports at prices consistent with the old exchange rate regime; moreover, other countries are still pegging their currencies to make their domestic manufacturers' exports to the U.S. extraordinarily cheap, and it is altogether possible that the Chinese are now actually out-sourcing their production to localities in eastern and southern Asia where currency pegging is still the rule of international trade. (That gambit will not save the likes of companies like Walmart, which married its supply chain with brick and mortar to the Chinese Mainland and will now, as a result, have those famous low-low prices turn not so low-low over the coming few years).

So I got the card at about a 20 percent discount to new retail. Although a good deal, it did not seem to be one that was too good to be legitimate.


Dark Wraith
Professor, Writer, Photographer
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chroaz Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Apr 2009Thu 02-Jun-11 12:23 AM
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#71. "!"
In response to Reply # 70


Cave Creek, US
          

Your turn of phrase is beguiling!! Thank you.

At 20% off "retail", especially with all the rebates around, I think I would agree that alarm bells might not sound.

Personally I like the idea of not dedicating too much time to background research into the art of buying, and am lazy enough to go with a store I trust; who will process a return without too much hassle, and who offers any/all the OEM flavor of the month rebates. SanDisk seem to have a lot of rebates.

"Fixed" (I use the word deliberately!) pricing is a BxxxH for the consumer, but sometimes it's a safer course to tread.

Thanks again for sharing this tale of woe, and I am truly sorry you lost your captures due to the malfeasance of an unscrupulous merchant.

Chris

When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.
- Ansel Adams

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bobr Silver Member Nikonian since 09th Jun 2004Wed 08-Jun-11 04:18 PM
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#74. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 69


pitman, US
          

Hi Alan,

I followed your saga with some interest, since I had similar experience with counterfeit cards a couple of years ago. I had purchased a pair of CF cards from an "authorized Sandisk dealer" on Ebay, who had an impressive positive feedback rating. One of the cards failed, but I was able to recover all but a few of the images using RescuePro.
When I contacted Sandisk, under the limited lifetime warranty, the first thing the the customer service rep asked me, after the purchase details, was for the serial # on the card-whoops-no number. I did however,get my money back from PayPal with no fuss. I've since limited my purchasing of memory cards to B&H, periodically checking their site for deals from Lexar and Sandisk that can make the cards as cheap as any of the Ebay sellers. This is particularly evident, when those manufacturers introduce new technology in a new generation of card, which doesn't matter much to me now, as my cameras can only write at 30Mbs to the card. I still, even from B&H, check the card with a magnifying glass for the etched serial # on the card.

Bob

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Wed 08-Jun-11 04:26 PM
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#75. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 74


US
          

Believe it or not, Bob, according to LC Technologies, that counterfeit card I bought actually had a serial number on it. The technician told me that it was in the "wrong place," but it was there. He told me this in the context of a narrative of all the things I should have noted: the logo wasn't quite right, the fonts were not quite right, the serial number was in the wrong place, etc. To my untrained eye, it all looked fine, but apparently, the key to identifying a counterfeit like mine isn't finding an absence of something, but instead it's a matter of finding something wrong with it even though it's there.

Grr.


Dark Wraith
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bobr Silver Member Nikonian since 09th Jun 2004Wed 08-Jun-11 10:14 PM
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#76. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 75


pitman, US
          

Alan-just goes to show how technology advances (for the counterfeiters).
When it happened to me, the faux cards were just starting to flood onto the market place and according to the Sandisk rep I talked to, the equipment needed to encode the serial # was proprietary technology by the legit card makers-hence the lack of a number was a dead giveaway. This was I think my first card purchase on my initial journey into digital from film, so I knew nothing. Very sorry to hear about your loss.

Bob

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fjcranston Registered since 25th Jan 2011Fri 10-Jun-11 02:15 AM
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#77. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 76


US
          

I have a burning question that I don't think was answered yet . . .

Was the card you purchased from an Ebay merchant delivered in full retail packaging?

I'm hoping that is one way to tell a fake if you are buying some kind of bulk version versus the retail packaged one. I've seen many stores sell these bulk style cards that don't have the package so I know they are everywhere.

Thanks,
Frank

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Dark Wraith Registered since 05th Apr 2010Fri 10-Jun-11 04:13 AM
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#78. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 77


US
          

No, it was not delivered in packaging other than the small plastic packet commonly used to store these cards. The problem is that the pictures on eBay from retail merchants almost never show anything but the card, itself, so a buyer doesn't know whether the item that gets delivered will be in the retail box or not. In fact, even Amazon.com shows pictures of the cards only and leaves it to the buyer to assume that what shows up in the mailbox will be in a box.

You are, of course, right that upon delivery I should have been suspicious that it wasn't in a retail Sandisk package, but for one reason or another, that deficiency did not strike me at the time. As I had stipulated in several previous posts on this thread, the failure of the counterfeit card was merely symptomatic of my own failure in purchasing it, using it, and relying upon it.

On the bright side, I now know more about the current state of flash card counterfeiting than I would have known if this hadn't happened, and so do all of you good participants here at Nikonians who have followed this thread. I don't know if encountering counterfeit cards will be a common occurrence or if it will be one of those rare and unfortunate events, but at least some Nikonians now know details about the problem of counterfeiting that might help them be more cautious than I was.

On another good note, I have now stepped up to Sandisk Extreme Pro UHS-1 cards, and I am reasonably sure they are authentic. The result of this whole saga is that I have gone on in my photography work with considerably less hubris and ambition that can cause harm beyond me. (I invite all of the readers here to see my follow-up post here in the D7000 forum.) Notwithstanding much folklore and many stories of success in licentious daring, learning to be more cautious and less ambitious is generally a good thing.


Dark Wraith
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RGBnik Registered since 02nd Feb 2009Mon 13-Jun-11 02:28 AM
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#79. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 78


CA
          

Have followed this very informative forum with interest.

And yes they're out there, same as the Gucci's & Rolexe's knockoffs. Just hope that no one experiences a loss such as yours but it's a big world out there so it is possible it has already happened to someone else and will in future - just that we don't hear about it but yours has been the exception....

Thanks for sharing your bad experience and continued success with your new venture...

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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jsfoster Registered since 19th Apr 2011Mon 13-Jun-11 07:46 PM
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#80. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 79


US
          

A very scary tale, but we -probably- have all lost important images, by not putting in the Nikon F properly,for instance, and the crank kept winding after '36', why? Awful.

Personally i am glad it turned out to be a knock off card, though that also is scary.
I would like to note that on June 3rd of this year I shot my D7000 for 3 hours straight, over 1000 images. My SB-700 w/ new batteries started flagging at 5-600 images, which slowed down the D7000 a little.
That camera seems to me incredible, strong and precise. I admit to some of the same hubris, and maybe that is the lesson for us all...
thanks for this incredible thread..

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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jsfoster Registered since 19th Apr 2011Mon 13-Jun-11 07:47 PM
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#81. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 79


US
          

A very scary tale, but we -probably- have all lost important images, by not putting in the Nikon F properly,for instance, and the crank kept winding after '36', why? Awful.

Personally i am glad it turned out to be a knock off card, though that also is scary.
I would like to note that on June 3rd of this year I shot my D7000 for 3 hours straight, over 1000 images. My SB-700 w/ new batteries started flagging at 5-600 images, which slowed down the D7000 a little.
That camera seems to me incredible, strong and precise. I admit to some of the same hubris, and maybe that is the lesson for us all...
thanks for this incredible thread..

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Tue 14-Jun-11 12:53 AM
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#82. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 81


Novi, US
          

I can't tell you how thankful I am for this post. For a year I've been planning a trip to Italy (I leave in a week). The trip was the catalyst for my purchase of the D7000 and three lenses, and the photographic aspect of this trip has been in the planning for months.

I purchased one 16GB Class 6 SanDisk Extreme Card and received two more from my WishList at my favorite store, Amazon. Except that while they were fulfilled by Amazon, they were actually from another vendor (Komputerbay.com). They were in retail packaging complete with a serial number for RescuePro software, so it looked good.

After reading this thread I wrote SanDisk and asked if the fact that I had valid RescuePro serial numbers meant they were legit cards. They said "probably", but if I sent them pictures and additional information, they'd give me a better idea.

I almost let it go after that but followed up. Sure enough, they were all counterfeit!! This could have ruined my vacation photography left me quite devastated. Fortunately, there is time to get legitimate cards.

Amazon was good to refund my money, though I honestly don't think the customer service rep knew what the word "counterfeit" meant.

Mike

  

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fjcranston Registered since 25th Jan 2011Tue 14-Jun-11 01:37 AM
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#83. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 82


US
          

>I can't tell you how thankful I am for this post. For a year
>I've been planning a trip to Italy (I leave in a week). The
>trip was the catalyst for my purchase of the D7000 and three
>lenses, and the photographic aspect of this trip has been in
>the planning for months.
>
>I purchased one 16GB Class 6 SanDisk Extreme Card and received
>two more from my WishList at my favorite store, Amazon.
>Except that while they were fulfilled by Amazon, they were
>actually from another vendor (Komputerbay.com). They were in
>retail packaging complete with a serial number for RescuePro
>software, so it looked good.
>
>After reading this thread I wrote SanDisk and asked if the
>fact that I had valid RescuePro serial numbers meant they were
>legit cards. They said "probably", but if I sent
>them pictures and additional information, they'd give me a
>better idea.
>
>I almost let it go after that but followed up. Sure enough,
>they were all counterfeit!! This could have ruined my
>vacation photography left me quite devastated. Fortunately,
>there is time to get legitimate cards.
>
>Amazon was good to refund my money, though I honestly don't
>think the customer service rep knew what the word
>"counterfeit" meant.


So what was it about your cards that they could tell they were counterfeit? I did the same thing, purchased from Amazon and fulfilled by some other outfit. Mine were in retail packaging and had the certificate for the recovery software,etc. Now I'm worried.

I'm about ready to order up a half dozen raw steel cards from hoodman and just stop buying from Amazon and San Disk both.

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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Tue 14-Jun-11 01:52 AM
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#84. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 83


Novi, US
          

I sent pictures and I sent the numbers that were on the back of the cards. The response I got back was "Upon reviewing the picture, it appears that the card is not a genuine SanDisk card. In addition, all our SD cards will have a part number at the back which yours doesn't have."

Now each card did have a number on the back, but all of the numbers were different, like a serial #. I emailed those serial numbers with my pictures.

The new cards I just bought from NewEgg also had a similar number on the back, but both of them had the same number (indicating a part number). Also, the MADE IN CHINA was a lot different on the card I got from Amazon vs the one I got from B&H. There was also something different (very subtle) about the label.

SanDisk has a list of authorized online resellers on their website. They say if you buy from those companies you don't have to worry, it will be Genuine.

Yeah....who do you buy from. This is really terrible.

Mike

  

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chroaz Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Apr 2009Tue 14-Jun-11 01:55 AM
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#85. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 84


Cave Creek, US
          

This is a terrible tale as you say. Personally I have ALWAYS bought my cards exclusively from B&H, and (touch wood) never had a problem.

Have a great time in Italy.

Chris

When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.
- Ansel Adams

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mikesrc Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd May 2009Thu 30-Jun-11 02:48 PM
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#87. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 85


OKLAHOMA CITY, US
          

Now you guys have me worried. Just bought a couple 8Gigs from best buy and I see NO numbers of any kind on the cards. None. Where should they be??

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chroaz Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Apr 2009Thu 30-Jun-11 03:22 PM
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#88. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 87


Cave Creek, US
          

SanDisk cards usually have a "serial" number etched at the bottom of the back of the card above a "Made in China" mark.

Chris

When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.
- Ansel Adams

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paul_7e Silver Member Charter MemberFri 01-Jul-11 06:05 PM
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#89. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 88


US
          

I could not see the "serial" number without using a magnifying glass. Do the folks who make the counterfeit cards know about the serial number?

  

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chroaz Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Apr 2009Fri 01-Jul-11 07:26 PM
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#90. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 89


Cave Creek, US
          

Yes - I think earlier in this post the OP said his counterfeit card had some sort of number on it.

When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.
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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Sat 02-Jul-11 11:11 AM
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#91. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 90


St Petersburg, RU
          


This thread has been interesting and for many a bit scary. Maybe the reason I have not had these problems is that I do not normally buy SanDisk because the only one I did, failed with about 100 event photos on it. I am sure they make a good product, and mine had been for for months. But buying brand name of 2nd tier companies probably results in more confidence in it not being counterfit....why would a counterfieter want to copy a Maxell or Patriot card when for the same effort put the logo of a more expensive brand on it. It would be interesting to find someone in China where these are made to find out what brand names are attached to the cards produced by the company supplying the cards for Sandisk.

As a fast rule, I never commit any more images on any media than I am willing to have fail. Whenever I say this people on the forum say I am nuts but they have not had major losses due to media failure. After getting a D7000 I have moved up in size to 8gig cards, whereas 4 gig was my limit before with the smaller 12mpx raw files.
Cards fail, and they are write cycle life limited so you KNOW it is going to fail without warning someday so why risk an important session by putting all eggs in one basket? I had a media failure that cost me $100,000 out of pocket to replace the sessions so I go by my self imposed rule ever since. When considering the number of images to put on a card, I think to myself "can I risk losing more if the failure occurred now", and usually swap cards. When shooting events, I have 8-10 4-8gig cards in the pockets of my Black Rapid RS-5 and can swap out a card with one hand in 3 seconds. The last time I had a card fail was 3 weeks ago and lost only 98 images but the other 4 cards were fine.

When I read of people investing in 64gig cards so they never have to change cards I can only wish them luck, they will need it, but doing so, it probably means they just do not care about or have anything invested in the images.

The assumption that the camera is not up to rapid and continuous work is proven wrong daily all over the world. My D90 has 75,000 frames on it, mostly events with faster frame rates and all with flash than the event this thread is about, and never any indication that it was not up to the task. If the SB600 is taking too long to cycle, it means you are getting full dumps which also means the subjects are either just too far away for speedlights or there is too much path attenuation. Even in conditions where there is little to bounce from, with matte black high ceilings, it is very rare for my SB900's to not even have the Ready light go out between shots. Getting closer or finding an effective path for reflections can really reduce the power required per shot with distant subjects.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Sat 30-Jul-11 12:04 PM
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#95. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 91


Toronto, CA
          

>It would be
>interesting to find someone in China where these are made to
>find out what brand names are attached to the cards produced
>by the company supplying the cards for Sandisk.

Stan - Everybody isn't a middler. SanDisk is the largest OEM of NAND flash memory and cards in the world. It is SanDisk that makes cards for 2nd tier brands. You've got it reversed - SanDisk is a top tier maker.

The links above jump to various SanDisk announcement about its own Fabs, joint ventures with Toshiba (a Fab manufacturing dev specialist amont other things) and the latest processed that SanDisk is using in its own Fabs.

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kevin4617 Registered since 07th Apr 2009Sun 17-Jul-11 03:53 PM
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#92. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 0


Loveland, US
          

After reading this thread I checked my 8GB Sandisk Ultra cards. I purchased them from Amazon and both came from Komputerbay LTD. So, I went to the Sandisk website and registered both cards. Both seem to register without errors or warnings.

I have not had problems with my cards, but was worried because of the vendory I bought from.

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Lissajous Silver Member Nikonian since 01st May 2011Thu 25-Aug-11 09:53 AM
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#96. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 92


Gosford, AU
          

My sincere condolences to those of you who have been ripped off in these scams. I too had a similar experience buying a USB flash drive on eBay a few years back. That place is awash with fake memory products. Happily, I detected it very quickly and PayPal ended up covering my loss.

How did I detect it you ask? Maybe it's the engineer in me but I'm the type who tests everything (including my wife's patience!). So the device went straight from the postman into my PC where I filled it with files before reading them back. It didn't take long to get read errors. I was about to write some software to do this in a tidier manner when it occurred to me that it must exist. A quick Google search turned up a Windows utility from a German magazine cover called H2testw. I recommend it to all. I routinely use it on every flash memory product I buy as part of acceptance / commissioning.

While the interface is in German there is a labelled button for English. No installation is needed. Just extract the executable from the ZIP or ARJ archive you download and run it. The utility then writes a test pattern in a zillion little files until the drive is full before reading them back. It can be told to do the read test repeatedly.

It may help you guys to know a little of what's happening here. Inside the memory module is a controller and a memory module. The villains commonly reprogram the controller to report an inflated capacity to the host computer, change the labels and flog it off. Simple as that (although the re-labelling step can be pretty elaborate). Then if you throw a few files on it to test it, all will initially appear fine. My issue was with a 32GB drive. It had been faked from a 2GB unit. So until I wrote past the 2GB point, all worked just fine. That's where the above utility comes in. It tests that the full reported capacity is indeed there. Note that although the utility does report the achieved read and write speeds, this will usually reflect your PC performance rather than the module specs. Also, it doesn't measure reliability or any other quality aspects. But it does detect the common fakes. And that's what you guys need. If someone were to re-badge a Class 2 card as Class 10 it will still store images but just be tardy. If someone knows of a utility to verify speed (both burst and minimum) please let me know - I'm all ears!

BTW, what one guy can tweak, another can re-tweak. I was able to identify the controller chip and reprogram it to report 2GB. So after PayPal covered my loss I was able to also pocket a freebie 2GB USB drive. Grumble...

Sorry my first post here had to be so long. Hope it's helpful.

John

PS: I just located my archived distribution of H2testw so I'll try to attach it.

http://www.nikonians.org/dcfp/user_files/202771.zip

Attachment #1, (zip file)

  

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KenLPhotos Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Jul 2009Thu 25-Aug-11 12:26 PM
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#97. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 96


Stewartstown, US
          

Thanks John for the tool. I love tools! It worked and checked my flash cards as valid.

KenL

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There are many 'images of beautiful objects' but few 'beautiful images of objects'.

  

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cosmicfires Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Nov 2011Tue 12-Feb-13 04:47 PM
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#99. "RE: Catastrophic Data Loss (and Likely Why It Happened)"
In response to Reply # 97


US
          

I just noticed this thread, I will be checking all my cards. In the future I will put the serial number of the card on the invoice for tracking in the future.

I once bought a hard drive from and amazon seller that was refurbished, not new. The seller told me it was just as good as new. amazon never replied to my complaint. My credit card company refunded my money, hopefully the seller suffered.

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