Go to a  "printer friendly" view of this message which allow an easy print Printer-friendly copy Go to the page which allows you to send this topic link and a message to a friend Email this topic to a friend
Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D7100, D7000 (Public) topic #9139
View in linear mode

Subject: "Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO" Previous topic | Next topic
J_Harris Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Mar 2011Mon 09-May-11 07:53 PM
664 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
"Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
Mon 09-May-11 07:57 PM by J_Harris

US
          

I've been expirementing using my new D7000 in lower light situations like cloudy, hazy days.

What is your opinions on which is the better option to brighten a picture without decreasing its overall quality, raise the exposure compensation or raise the ISO without going above ISO 400? I shoot using aperture priority, and always ensure my shutter speed is at least 1-1/2 times greater than than the focal length.

I prefer not to use Active D-lighting at this time.

Thanks

Edit:

P.S. Has anyone else got so frustrated with accidentally hitting the DOF button, that you changed it to another function?

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO
greenwing Gold Member
09th May 2011
1
Reply message RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO
aolander Silver Member
09th May 2011
2
Reply message RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO
J_Harris Silver Member
09th May 2011
3
     Reply message RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO
kuzzy Silver Member
10th May 2011
4
Reply message RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO
Captain Rich Silver Member
10th May 2011
5
Reply message RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO
carpemoment
10th May 2011
6
Reply message RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO
mdallie Silver Member
11th May 2011
7
Reply message RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO
gqtuazon Silver Member
12th May 2011
8

greenwing Gold Member Nikonian since 18th May 2006Mon 09-May-11 09:02 PM
1299 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#1. "RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
In response to Reply # 0


Yorkshire, GB
          

Increasing ISO won't give you a brighter picture, it will just increase the shutter speed for a given aperture. You might want to add exposure compensation AND increase the ISO to keep the same shutter speed for the aperture.

Chris

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

aolander Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Sep 2006Mon 09-May-11 11:00 PM
3175 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#2. "RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 09-May-11 11:12 PM by aolander

Nevis, US
          

Exposure comp and increasing ISO don't do the same thing. Using exposure compensation is telling your camera to over or under expose an image from what the camera wants to do. Raising the ISO is increasing the sensitivity of the sensor, so to speak. If you raise the ISO and let the camera do its thing, the exposure will be the same (same brightness); the camera will either closing down the aperture or increase the shutter speed to get the same exposure (brightness). If you add + compensation you will increase the exposure (increase brightness); the camera will either open up the aperture or decrease the shutter speed to get a brighter image.

Perhaps more simply, if you up the ISO and do nothing else, the camera will compensate and the exposure will be the same. You need to use + compensation to increase the brightness, or manually use a larger aperture or slower shutter speed.

Alan

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
J_Harris Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Mar 2011Mon 09-May-11 11:31 PM
664 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#3. "RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
In response to Reply # 2
Mon 09-May-11 11:35 PM by J_Harris

US
          


Thanks for the information.

I was aware that raising the ISO will increase shutter speed, but I have always believed it would increase light to the sensor too. Thank you for setting this newbie straight.

I need to spend more time reading the manual, and invest in a "How To" book. Making the jump from a D3100 to the D7000 is challenging, but also a lot of fun.

With my Canon AE-1 "Program" that I owned from 1982/83-2010 I just set everything to "Auto" and clicked away. Now I'm enjoying the digital challenge of my D3100 and D7000.

I've spent to much time buying and experimenting with Nikon lenses and not enough time learning and practicing the basics.

Thanks again.



Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
kuzzy Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Dec 2005Tue 10-May-11 02:41 AM
1250 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#4. "RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
In response to Reply # 3


Milford, US
          

Hello Jerry, I had an AE1 for many of years until I wore the thing out and really loved that camera and the photos that it produced with the 50mm lens I had with it.

If the camera was set in manual mode, you set the shutter and aperature and then you raised the ISO you would get brighter shots with each rise in the ISO. Any reason why ISO 400 is a ceiling? You can pretty much go to 1600 with almost no noise at all and I have gone as far as 6400 with excellent results.

Marc
There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.-Ansel Adams

http://500px.com/WhatISaw
http://kuzzy.smugmug.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Captain Rich Silver Member Nikonian since 25th May 2006Tue 10-May-11 01:14 PM
1179 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#5. "RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
In response to Reply # 0


Savannah, US
          

I'm always hitting the DOF button inadvertantly, but I haven't reprogrammed it. I think it's a function of the small body and my own clumsiness. Didn't have this issue with my D200, but I'm gradually learning to use the 7K more efficiently.

Rich

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
carpemoment Registered since 17th Dec 2009Tue 10-May-11 03:07 PM
282 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#6. "RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
In response to Reply # 5


Raleigh, US
          

My biggest problem on the D7000 is the Mode dial. I manage to accidentally hit it without realizing it and end up on A when I set it to S. I wish it had the Release Mode Dial feature or that it was a little more resistant to a brush of a thumb.

I've also been getting very good results at ISO1600. I even been pleased with ISO2500 in some lighting situations.

Visit <www.carpemoment.com>.


or http://gary-adkins.fineartamerica.com


Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Wed 11-May-11 10:12 AM
228 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#7. "RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
In response to Reply # 0


Novi, US
          

Overexposing by using exposure compensation isn't going to do a good job of brightening up a gloomy day. You won't get what you desire.

The only way I've found to get what you want is to include sky in the picture, and then use Photoshop to replace the grey sky with a sunny sky. It seems to have an affect on the whole picture.

Mike

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
gqtuazon Silver Member Nikonian since 18th Nov 2009Thu 12-May-11 11:33 PM
640 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#8. "RE: Exposure Compensation Versus Higher ISO"
In response to Reply # 7
Thu 12-May-11 11:34 PM by gqtuazon

FPO, US
          

>If the camera was set in manual mode, you set the shutter and aperature and then you raised the ISO you would get brighter shots with each rise in the ISO.

This is exactly what I got when I did this experiment using manual mode with D lighting off. Here are the results of the images. I intentionally left the living room darker to see how the camera handles noise when shooting in darker areas especially with shadows. Click on the images for larger view.

M mode, f5, 1/30, ISO 3200



ISO 6400



ISO 10,000 (H.7)





Regards,

Glenn
http://www.flickr.com/photos/24917880@N02
http://gqtuazonphotography.smugmug.com

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D7100, D7000 (Public) topic #9139 Previous topic | Next topic


Take the Nikonians Tour and learn more about being a Nikonian Wiki /FAQ /Help Listen to our MP3 photography radio channels Find anything on Nikon and imaging technology - fast!

Copyright © Nikonians 2000, 2014
All Rights Reserved

Nikonians®, NikoScope® and NikoniansAcademy™ are trademarks owned by Nikonians.org.
Nikon®, Nikonos® and Nikkor® are registered trademarks of Nikon Corporation.