Go to a  "printer friendly" view of this message which allow an easy print Printer-friendly copy Go to the page which allows you to send this topic link and a message to a friend Email this topic to a friend
Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D7100, D7000 (Public) topic #6812
View in linear mode

Subject: "Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?" Previous topic | Next topic
jmiguez Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2010Fri 11-Mar-11 12:18 PM
465 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
"Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"


Lafayette, US
          

In JohnE Nikon's lens testing thread much was said about proper technique, especially focusing technique. Could those of you who have been taking pictures for a while help those of us who may not have hundreds of thousands of pictures experience?

I see photography as both art and a technical skill. Is there an art to taking the shot? I always figured the art was in the composition, lighting, exposure, etc. Not in focusing?

Most modern lenses no longer have the DOF markings, so you can't just set it and forget, like the newspaper reporters of old. Unless it is a portrait or mountain that doesn't move, manual focusing seems unrealistic in most cases.

That leaves us with the auto-focus. It has to work, if we are to reasonably expect a decently focused picture. I know that with my D40 my 18-200 lens would sometimes not focus. The camera and lens had trouble with certain situations. With the D-7000, I do not recall it ever not focusing? However, sometimes the shots weren't in perfect focus.

I have always written this off to the myriad of variables the camera deals with. That is why I never take one picture of anything. I figure, take enough shots and changes are one or two will be close to perfect.

Can anyone provide guidelines on how to achiever proper focusing? What techniques insure more accurate sharpness? How do you make sure the camera is focusing on the point you think it is focusing?

John

My Pictures may be seen here: http://jmiguez.smugmug.com/

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
JohnE Nikon Silver Member
11th Mar 2011
1
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
luckyphoto Silver Member
11th Mar 2011
2
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
JPJ Silver Member
11th Mar 2011
3
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
JohnE Nikon Silver Member
11th Mar 2011
4
     Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
JPJ Silver Member
11th Mar 2011
5
     Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
agitater Gold Member
11th Mar 2011
6
     Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
kuzzy Silver Member
11th Mar 2011
9
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
agitater Gold Member
11th Mar 2011
7
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
Wingman Silver Member
11th Mar 2011
8
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
JPJ Silver Member
11th Mar 2011
10
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
Len Shepherd Gold Member
12th Mar 2011
11
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
KnightPhoto Gold Member
12th Mar 2011
12
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
jmiguez Silver Member
12th Mar 2011
13
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
luckyphoto Silver Member
14th Mar 2011
14
Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
agitater Gold Member
14th Mar 2011
15
     Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
mszak50
14th Mar 2011
16
     Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
km6xz Moderator
14th Mar 2011
17
          Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
waxart
14th Mar 2011
18
          Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
KnightPhoto Gold Member
15th Mar 2011
19
          Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
agitater Gold Member
15th Mar 2011
20
               Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
waxart
15th Mar 2011
21
                    Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
max and kate
15th Mar 2011
22
                    Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
waxart
16th Mar 2011
26
                    Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
gkaiseril Gold Member
15th Mar 2011
23
                    Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
agitater Gold Member
16th Mar 2011
25
          Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
gkaiseril Gold Member
15th Mar 2011
24
               Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
drmarkf Silver Member
17th Mar 2011
27
                    Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
briantilley Moderator
17th Mar 2011
28
                         Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
drmarkf Silver Member
17th Mar 2011
29
                              Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
igordb Silver Member
17th Mar 2011
30
                              Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
drmarkf Silver Member
17th Mar 2011
32
                                   Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
igordb Silver Member
17th Mar 2011
33
                                        Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
drmarkf Silver Member
17th Mar 2011
34
                              Reply message RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?
agitater Gold Member
17th Mar 2011
31

JohnE Nikon Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jun 2010Fri 11-Mar-11 12:42 PM
916 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#1. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 0


New HArtford, US
          

John,
Thanks for post.
I am anxiously awaiting responses.
You already helped.
I don't always take more then 1 picture of same subject.
I wonder do people keep it on rapid fire and take a few shots for each attempt?
At a recent party I had >85% sharp well exposed images. There was one where the subject matter and timing was perfect. Their eyes were soft. I wish I had this one bit of advice before party. On the other hand, it would make culling and wading through the already large amount of images I obtain even more arduous.

JohnE Nikon
https://plus.google.com/photos/104310967428146619677/albums?hl=en

https://picasaweb.google.com/104310967428146619677


"Cameras and lenses are simply tools to place our unique vision on film. Concentrate on equipment and you'll take technically good photographs. Concentrate on seeing the light's magic colors and your images will stir the soul." Jack Dykinga

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
luckyphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Fri 11-Mar-11 01:15 PM
739 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#2. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 1


Port Charlotte, US
          

This is a subject well worth discussing. Last night I found out that Aperture also has the ability to show the focus point. Once I turned it on and looked at some of my earlier "softer" photos I understood why.

General tips, tricks and guidelines on focus issues could probably fill a book.

If everyone could respond with one or two of their focus secrets we could probably distill that down into a nice reference.

I'll start by saying that I now use single point focus on most subjects that are not moving. I either move the focus point to the subject or put the focus point on the subject, hold the shutter half way down and recompose the photo. BTW - it doesn't work well for birds in flight!

Larry

"Red is gray and yellow white, but we decide which is right
....and which is an illusion"

Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

JPJ Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Aug 2009Fri 11-Mar-11 03:18 PM
1327 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#3. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 11-Mar-11 03:20 PM by JPJ

Toronto, CA
          

I think your question leads to another question: how many people truly understand the autofocus sytem in their camera.

Do people understand 1. how AF works, 2. why is may misfire and 3. how to troubleshoot it. In order to understand #2 and #3 you have to understand #1. Once you understand #1 you will appreciate that it is entirely improbable to expect 100% accuracy from your AF system, but you can increase the odds of having a high precentage of keepers by understanding the system.

Rather than reinvent the wheel let me link some very worthwhile reading imo:

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/camera-autofocus.htm
http://www.bythom.com/autofocus.htm
http://www.bythom.com/autofocus2.htm
http://www.nikonians.org/nikon/d2x_sensor_size/

The actual size of your AF sensor is a key reason why many people have AF misfire imo (obviously not the only issue, but it is frequently unknown to the user who believes the focus brackets/box is infallible).

As for my system, I think decoupling the AF from the shutter works well for me, I find the d7000 shutter to be particularly responsive and inconsistent finger pressure (as may occur when you are trying to compose, steady and squeeze for a shot), may result in inadvertent refocus. I also tend to leave my camera of AF-C, 9 point and normally have it set to focus priority. Ultimately this means I can keep my finger on the AF-L/AF-E button to keep continuous AF and take it off when I want to keep focus locked. I will occassionally use AF-S as well in certain set situations, like portraits on a tripod. If I am shooting moving objects, like sports I will normally just switch over to release priority mode. For BIF (which I rarely do) I normally use 21 point and release priority.

AF target selection is key to getting a sharp photo. You want to choose a target that is large enough relative to the sensor that it won't be confused about what you are aiming at (it covers the sensor). This is where knwoing the size of your sensor becomes key. You also want to avoid having a situation where your sensor is covering that target but overlapping as well on to another contrasty object. Further the contrast between your target and it's surroundings must be sufficient to allow the AF system to differentiate between them. Basically I determine what I want to be sharp and I will aim at largest, most contrasty (relative to the surroundings) target that is parallel to it.

Your aperture, shutter speed and ISO obviously all play a role in photo sharpness as well. In some cases you may have to choose which one you are going to compromise on in order to get the best possible result. Normally I will compromise on ISO up until about 1600 when I will start thinking about compromising aperture unless I can reduce the shutter speed without introducing camera shake or subject movement issues, normally I cannot or I wouldn't be compromising ISO at that point.

As for technique, I am assuming you are asking about handholding as opposed to monopod or tripod use. My hand holding technique involves having a good base (if standing I try and set my left foot out front and my right foor slightly back). I am a left eye shooter, I will press the camera firmly against my eye with my right hand on the grip and my left hand is normally under the lens. Most critically, elbows are in as close to the body as possible. I change my stance if there is something to lean back against, in which case I will do that. When I actually press the shutter I hold my breath just before and release after the shot is fired. When I press the shutter I am gently increasing pressure by rolling my finger as opposed to pressing down hard the moment I want to fire.

When able I try and use a tripod or monopod. This is actually one of the benefits of buying a Gitzo, once you spend that much money you will be highly motivated to use it!

Jason

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
JohnE Nikon Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jun 2010Fri 11-Mar-11 03:47 PM
916 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#4. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 3
Fri 11-Mar-11 06:44 PM by JohnE Nikon

New HArtford, US
          

Thanks for detailed answer Jason.

I use nearly the same setup with the exception for portraits I use the single center focus as opposed to 9 points with the rational I want eye and not nose or something else being tack sharp. This would be especially important with shallow DOF with lenses that really open up.

Also I keep it on release if using AE/AF lock for focus and re-composition with the rational that I already focused and now I just want the camera to release shutter. I don't want the camera to tell me prior to shutter release that I don't have focus because at the time of shutter release my central focus sensor may no longer be on main subject.
I have seen some of your images and am quite impressed. Do you have any comments on my logic for the slight difference in set up?

Also I read your above links. The first link seems to say do not focus and recompose as your distance / focus will be slightly off.
I'm a little rusty on my trigonometry, but on the surface I think this is true. I think focus could be off up to an inch with focus recompose method that I use.

A quote from the first link:

"For portraits, the eye is the best focus point—both because this is a standard and because it has good contrast. Although the central autofocus sensor is usually most sensitive, the most accurate focusing is achieved using the off-center focus points for off-center subjects. If one were to instead use the central AF point to achieve a focus lock (prior to recomposing for an off-center subject), the focus distance will always be behind the actual subject distance—and this error increases for closer subjects. Accurate focus is especially important for portraits because these typically have a shallow depth of field."

This makes me wonder if I should use the pad and move my focus around.
I never do this. I actually lock it to center.

I did a search and found this interesting post which helps you visualize problem with focus/ recompose.

http://visual-vacations.com/Photography/focus-recompose_sucks.htm

Another site confirming this.
http://improvephotography.com/216/photography-focus-recompose-compose-portrait/

Just wondering, do many use this method? Do pro portrait shooters really use this method?


JohnE Nikon
https://plus.google.com/photos/104310967428146619677/albums?hl=en

https://picasaweb.google.com/104310967428146619677


"Cameras and lenses are simply tools to place our unique vision on film. Concentrate on equipment and you'll take technically good photographs. Concentrate on seeing the light's magic colors and your images will stir the soul." Jack Dykinga

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
JPJ Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Aug 2009Fri 11-Mar-11 06:59 PM
1327 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#5. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 4


Toronto, CA
          

>Thanks for detailed answer Jason.
>
>I use nearly the same setup with the exception for portraits I
>use the single center focus as opposed to 9 points with the
>rational I want eye and not nose or something else being tack
>sharp. This would be especially important with shallow DOF
>with lenses that really open up.
>
>Also I keep it on release if using AE/AF lock for focus and
>re-composition with the rational that I already focused and
>now I just want the camera to release shutter. I don't want
>the camera to tell me prior to shutter release that I don't
>have focus because at the time of shutter release my central
>focus sensor may no longer be on main subject.
>I have seen some of your images and am quite impressed. Do
>you have any comments on my logic for the slight difference in
>set up?


You answered the question, I don't focus and recompose due to a concern that in some situations it can cause your intended in focus area to be OOF. As such I want the camera to tell me when focus is locked so I know it is safe to shoot. I keep in this way so when it is locked I can release which eliminates the chance that the lens will try and refocus because of some minute movement.

As for portraits I have always aimed for the eye but only when it is big enough to fill the sensor area.

Jason

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Fri 11-Mar-11 09:30 PM
3955 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#6. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 5


Toronto, CA
          

>>Thanks for detailed answer Jason.
>>
>>I use nearly the same setup with the exception for
>portraits I
>>use the single center focus as opposed to 9 points with
>the
>>rational I want eye and not nose or something else being
>tack
>>sharp. This would be especially important with shallow
>DOF
>>with lenses that really open up.
>>
>>Also I keep it on release if using AE/AF lock for focus
>and
>>re-composition with the rational that I already focused
>and
>>now I just want the camera to release shutter. I don't
>want
>>the camera to tell me prior to shutter release that I
>don't
>>have focus because at the time of shutter release my
>central
>>focus sensor may no longer be on main subject.
>>I have seen some of your images and am quite impressed.
>Do
>>you have any comments on my logic for the slight
>difference in
>>set up?
>
>
>You answered the question, I don't focus and recompose due to
>a concern that in some situations it can cause your intended
>in focus area to be OOF. As such I want the camera to tell me
>when focus is locked so I know it is safe to shoot. I keep in
>this way so when it is locked I can release which eliminates
>the chance that the lens will try and refocus because of some
>minute movement.

You're absolutely right . . . when using very large apertures to obtain a shallow depth of field. In those situations, focus and recompose is much more difficult because often the slightest backward or forward movement of the photographer or the subject will result in ruined focus.

But at any aperture above f/5.6, with a subject 10' (3 meters) or more distant, focus and recompose normally works perfectly - just as it always has.

That said, too many photographers claim, "I didn't move at all!" when in fact they swayed quite a bit.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
kuzzy Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Dec 2005Fri 11-Mar-11 10:46 PM
1250 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#9. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 4


Milford, US
          

Unlock that center AF point and set it free

If you unlock the focus point leaving it in the center and focus on a good target then turn the camera similar to recomposing but move the focus point in the camera back to the target using the pad on the back of the camera you will find that the camera is going to refocus and will confirm exactly what those articles are telling you. Once you get used to using it you will be amazed how often you will move it around. I would strongly suggest that you change your display on your D7k to show only 11 points as the 39 are just way too many to deal with most of the time if you decide to go this route.

Marc
There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.-Ansel Adams

http://500px.com/WhatISaw
http://kuzzy.smugmug.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Fri 11-Mar-11 10:10 PM
3955 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#7. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 11-Mar-11 10:17 PM by agitater

Toronto, CA
          

>In JohnE Nikon's lens testing thread much was said about
>proper technique, especially focusing technique. Could those
>of you who have been taking pictures for a while help those of
>us who may not have hundreds of thousands of pictures
>experience?
>
>I see photography as both art and a technical skill. Is there
>an art to taking the shot? I always figured the art was in the
>composition, lighting, exposure, etc. Not in focusing?

Repeatable, sharp focus that you regularly acquire with confidence begins with good basic camera handholding technique, good basic shutter button technique, and the proper grip method. Note that grip method and handholding technique are related but different. None of it is complicated or physically demanding.

Shutter button technique first. The mistake committed most often by photographers is slightly pressing down the whole right side of the camera, as opposed to just pressing the shutter button downward.

Examine your finger position on the shutter button. Is your finger lying flat across the top of the button, or is it curved sufficiently to place only the tip of the finger pointing downward on the middle of the shutter button? The latter position is correct.

If, during the shutter button press, you push slightly on the top of the camera or too-firmly plunge the shutter button, you end up moving the whole camera. The result is usually a blurry shot. Practice correct shutter button technique by thinking about it and doing it correctly beginning today. I guarantee that over the course of a few weeks of regular shooting, your percentage of keepers will go up. You will also begin to gain a lot more confidence in the Nikon AF system.

Proper handholding technique is also fundamental to repeatable, sharp focus. Stand up straight, feet shoulder width apart and placed flat on stable ground. Your left hand should be placed under the lens, with the heel of the left hand partly under the front of the camera body. Left elbow should be held firmly against your rib cage. Your right hand should be high enough on the right grip so that your finger can be properly positioned (as noted above) over/on the shutter button. Your right elbow should be tucked firmly against your rib cage.

Aim, compose, frame, take a breath and let it out, press the shutter button to lock focus, then shoot. Some people focus first, then half press again after they're framed. It's up to you and it depends on the situation and how much time is available to make the shot. Practice proper handholding technique and your percentage of keepers will increase still more.

If you're bent down or squatting to make a shot, get one knee firmly braced on the ground. Keep a small foam pad in your bag or vest or a pocket to protect against wet or shaply rocky or just dirty ground or pavement. If you're in an awkward position, brace yourself against something truly solid. The point is that the moment you're unstable, your handholding technique becomes unstable, you're elbows aren't braced and you end up basically waving the camera around. Blurry shots ensue.

Grip is related to handolding technique. Despite having to brace the underside of the lens and body with your left hand, once you've chosen a focal length (using a zoom lens obvious) and once the camera has locked focus, keep those meddling fingers on your left hand from slightly moving the zoom ring or focus ring. There are so many photographers who absolutely swear they're not touching anything, but when I watch their technique I discover that they're inadvertently moving one ring or the other just as they press the shutter.

RELAX YOUR HANDS. Release your death grip on the camera. The tighter you grip the thing, the more you'll end up waving it around. Your right hand should be comfortable, only your pointer finger should move when the shutter is pressed (don't squeeze the whole camera!), and your left hand should be supporting the camera and lens underneath. Supporting, not squeezing them to death.

You may even find - if any of these three basically important techniques has been contributing to your focus difficulties - that your camera's formerly (apparently) problematic autofocus system seems to be suddenly working remarkably well.

Tripod work is another matter. I'll let a tripod shooter who successfully practices good tripod techniques pick it up from here.

Check my focus in my Nikonians Gallery and my photo.net galleries. 99% of everything in those galleries was shot handheld, 85% shot without VR.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Wingman Silver Member Awarded for sharing his excellent work and continued contribution to the forums, most notably at the Aviation forum. Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2002Fri 11-Mar-11 10:36 PM
1134 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#8. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 7


Kimberley, CA
          

Excellent thread! We all tend to take our focussing technique for granted, along with many other areas of shooting discipline. A couple of years ago I also started using the AF-on button and so decoupling focus and firing the shutter. I have found that this has enormously improved my shooting "workflow" and the consistency of my results. I would very highly recommend that anybody who has not used this technique give it a try.

I learned photography long before there was any such thing as autofocus. The AF-on button has proven to be a wonderful combination of the best of autofocus with the discipline of really thinking about where I want my focus point to be. Now if Nikon would just bring back the depth of field scale...

Neal Nurmi

---Wingman Photo---

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
JPJ Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Aug 2009Fri 11-Mar-11 11:57 PM
1327 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#10. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 7


Toronto, CA
          

>>In JohnE Nikon's lens testing thread much was said about
>>proper technique, especially focusing technique. Could
>those
>>of you who have been taking pictures for a while help
>those of
>>us who may not have hundreds of thousands of pictures
>>experience?
>>
>>I see photography as both art and a technical skill. Is
>there
>>an art to taking the shot? I always figured the art was in
>the
>>composition, lighting, exposure, etc. Not in focusing?
>
>Repeatable, sharp focus that you regularly acquire with
>confidence begins with good basic camera handholding
>technique, good basic shutter button technique, and the proper
>grip method. Note that grip method and handholding technique
>are related but different. None of it is complicated or
>physically demanding.
>
>Tripod work is another matter. I'll let a tripod shooter who
>successfully practices good tripod techniques pick it
>up from here.
>

Great description of hand placement, especially paying attention to not accidentally moving the focus ring, it happens more than people may think. I did it recently thus proving to me that despite practice, mistakes happen.

For people who have not seen them yet the handholding and tripod tutorials by JRP are here, complete with photos:

http://www.nikonians.org/resources/reviews/fundamentals

Monopod technique is here, sadly the foot diagrams also make up the sum total of my dance moves :

http://www.nikonians.org/monopods/what_monopod_3.html

Jason

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003Sat 12-Mar-11 06:31 AM
12722 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#11. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 0


Yorkshire, GB
          

>I always figured the art was in the composition, lighting, exposure, etc. Not in focusing?
>unless your subject is a portrait or mountain that doesn't move, manual focusing seems unrealistic in most cases.
The first thing about AF is there is some depth of field in front of where AF locks on.
If you are shooting at a focus distance and aperture where there is very little depth of field you can "waste" depth of field in front of the focus point.
In the bird with butterfly shot the AF locked on the front of the bird and the incident lasted about 1 second. It would have been better if there had been time to switch to manual focus to get the head feathers sharper.
Part of composition is focal length and aperture. In the bird picture I used 500mm to blur out the background.
In the second picture of the steps I want front to back sharpness and used manual focus and depth of field preview to make sure I got it.
I also used a wide angle lens to emphasize the form of the steps as a dominant part of the composition.
In the third picture I wanted the reflection to be sharpest.
As the reflection was dark and not the best AF target I used manual focus.
I also used a light tent and reflectors to get the lighting as I wanted.
What I am trying to describe is moving away from "snapshot" mode into taking control of image making.
To me snapshot mode is taking what is in front of the camera more or less on automatic settings.
Image making is much; more involving focus, depth of field, and focal length control as just 3 of the techniques that can help make the difference between "automatic" and "photographic".









Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)
Attachment #3, (jpg file)

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

KnightPhoto Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2006Sat 12-Mar-11 01:17 PM
4170 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#12. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 0


Alberta, CA
          

Good topic John, I have enjoyed reading the other responses and getting some tips from them! I use the following:

- 9 point dynamic, AF-C, delay=SHORT, and FOCUS rather than Release, and yes please hammer down on that shutter and hold it there wherever possible Good points by Harold and Jason about pressing down on the shutter and not the camera and not nudging the AF accidentally - I can get caught up in the moment when I'm shooting action, I'll have to watch for that.

- I should stress that I pretty much ALWAYS MOVE THE AF-SENSOR around and around when I'm shooting people, wildlife and landscape (turn Wrap-on BTW, it helps). My one exception is BIF where I use centre since it is so difficult to stay on your target, but if the bird lands then I am back to moving the AF-point off-centre again.

- I liked the comment about setting your points to 11 rather than 39. If you haven't done this give it a try. You can have fewer choices of places to move the AF-sensor but get there faster. I tend to always revert to the higher number though as I am picky about where I want to place my AF-point.

- I rarely rarely use MF - pretty much all my subjects are moving.

- I want a camera that allows me to move the AF-point anywhere in the viewfinder. It's possible that is what is coming with the new tech in the D4/D400. The only way I can think for this to work is embedding AF pixels into the sensor (there are some compact cameras just starting to come out with this). With the current design we are constrained by the size of the secondary mirror that sends light to the AF sensor. Anyhow, because I move the AF-sensor all the time, my desired composition is always constrained by the size of the AF sensor area within the viewfinder. So DX has an advantage here and I have to action-shoot my FX camera looser and crop more in post. (in FX I can't get my AF sensors out to the extreme sides or tops of the viewfinder as much as I can in DX).

- I use an iPhone app called f8 to calculate DOF (very handy).

- I also suggest these pants from Mark's Work Warehouse that are a lined-Jean material ("Hyper Dri rain"), waterproof on the outer layer. You can then sit, crouch, lay, kneel, or elbows on knees, and generally use your body as a tripod. I have kneeled and even lain down in small puddles, snow, ice, wet foliage, etc. and therefore get yourself into a good solid position.

Best regards, SteveK

'A camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.' -- Dorothea Lange
My Nikonians gallery
My Nikonians Blog

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

jmiguez Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2010Sat 12-Mar-11 01:48 PM
465 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#13. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 0


Lafayette, US
          

If anyone wanted to question the value of a Nikonian membership, they have to look no further than this thread. I feel like young Alexander of Macedonia walking with not only his tutor Aristotle, but Plato, Socrates, and Archimedes, as well.

Jason, I have read through all of the links you provided. They were most interesting and informative. While I don't understand decoupling the AF from the shutter, I am sure I can look that up in the D7000 manual.

I don't think I move the focus ring, but I do move the darn Command dial and change the shutter speed. That, however, hasn't anything to do with focusing. Just screwing up the shot. I wish there was a way to set it then disengage it.

John, I move the focus point a lot. Except when for when it won't move (which I have not yet figured out completely why?)it works well.

Howard, your posts are always sage and wise. Your detailed step by step approach of describing how to hold and use the camera was enlightening. I would love to spend about a week with you following you around and learning. Provided, I could keep up? Besides, I have never been to Ontario and I love Canada and its people. (Except in the winter)

Ken, your post with the three pictures was worth the price of admission in itself. Your description of composing with the bird picture is one in which I can relate. I am often shooting birds at distances of 50 meters or more. At that range, even with a 500mm lens, their heads are awful small. Often smaller than the sensor size.

The thought process you described within the few seconds you have to take the shot reminds me of the ability a Payton, Manning, Drew Brees, or Tom Brady has to read defenses just before choosing to whom to throw the ball. To use a colloquialism, "I ain't there yet."

I find it almost impossible to focus on something that far away and small manually. Sometimes I will use the AF to focus then turn it off and leave the lens in manual at that focus range. So long as the bird doesn't move, it stops the camera from locking on some twig and going out of focus.

I will remember your advise on using focus, DOF and focal length. Thanks!

Thanks to all of you for such an in depth look at focusing issues and more.


John

My Pictures may be seen here: http://jmiguez.smugmug.com/

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
luckyphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Mon 14-Mar-11 02:53 AM
739 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#14. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 13


Port Charlotte, US
          

My thanks as well.

Great discussion and a lot more to chew on. I now have at least one more bad habit I have to break to get a proper focus.

Larry

"Red is gray and yellow white, but we decide which is right
....and which is an illusion"

Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Mon 14-Mar-11 04:31 AM
3955 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#15. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 13


Toronto, CA
          

John - I'll give you the guided tour next time you're in town.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
mszak50 Registered since 01st Feb 2009Mon 14-Mar-11 09:33 AM
20 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#16. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 15


US
          


I agree with the previous poster - this thread alone made my membership worth it.

I was having lots of problems getting consistent focus shooting portraits. When I did get it right, the eyes would look glassy - otherwise, they would look cloudy. Come to find out, I was holding the camera wrong in portrait orientation (arm up high and over). So, I picked up a battery grip, and things went much better (although not perfect). I also wasn't pushing the viewfinder firmly against my glasses, and I was not depressing the focus button correctly. The latter probably is still not correct - old habits are hard to break.

The technique I was using was AF-ON mapped to AF AE LOCK, focus and recompose. While I had a lot more keepers this weekend, I did not get as many as I would like - I had a lot of issues with the d7000 not acquiring focus (105mm 2.8), so the shoot went at a much slower pace than I would have liked. But it was improved!




Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Mon 14-Mar-11 10:20 AM
3292 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#17. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 15
Tue 15-Mar-11 03:25 AM by km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
          

The comment about finger tip shutter action, instead of finger pad pressing is really an important point. Watch someones else take a shot and you can see it. They can't tell they are moving the whole camera or are drifting back while recomposing but someone not involved can see it. That might be an advantage of workshops and club shoots, neither of which I have done. Seeing others make the mistake that you can't see yourself when you are doing it, and having the instructor see and interrupt it before it becomes more of a habit.

I found that when action is taking place, gripping the lens harder was something I was doing automatically. I remember back in rifle training in the Air Force many decades ago, when I shifted from the normal AR15 or 16 to a bolt action precision rifle the instructor got onto me for gripping the rifle too firmly. He had me lay the rifle on my open left palm, and not use fingers at all. I started doing that with my longer lenses last year and noticed an improvement in hand held shots.
The same with the trigger finger which was not to pull the trigger but to progressively squeeze the trigger. I started consciously relaxing my right hand and slowly squeezing until the shutter was released and then continue the squeeze until bottoming out barely. By having the trigger point somewhere in the middle of the squeeze path, and continuing passed that point in a smooth ramp function of pressure seems to make a visible difference....just like in marksmanship competitin 40 years ago. I grew up around guns and outdoors but never liked guns or hunting so did not know the little tricks that were probably common knowledge for enthusiasts. I did pretty well on the range, and was picked for advanced training, that luckily was never used except in midway shooting games at the fair. The new delicate trigger point on the D7000 probably lends itself to this same technique better than the higher resistance shutter buttons.

I usually keep the AF point in the center when shooting events where there is 1 second set up time or less for a shot, and I don't recompose. I discovered that long ago that the AF needs to be off by a certain threshold value before focus reacquisition is started even in AF-C. Therefore since the center cross polarized AF sensor point is the best for low light scenes, I leave it there in AF-S and crop later. If there is time, and the AF assist can be used( the main reason I prefer AF-S)I change AF points. Much of the spontaneous portraits and candids are portrait oriented so I'll just keep the point at the rightside middle(top in portrait orientation).
If there is light, and have an AF-S lens mounted, I will recompose manually by tweaking the focus ring which turns off AF. The 70-200vr is a joy to manual AF because of that and the lock buttons at the end of the barrel. I think I would shot a lot more fully manual if I got a focusing screen that works even close to how good the film cameras did. MF was never a problem in film, it was fast and dead on with some of the micro mesh screens or split screens...if there was light.
When in doubt, stopping down allows recomposition to work due to the greater depth of field. For general flash event use, I usually keep it at f/4 on the 70-200 and open it if the image benefits from more subject isolation.
One thing that helps a lot is just shooting a lot and really looking at the results. Even though there is very little time to set up a shot, less than a second, after 25,000 shots or so, that 1 second becomes plenty of time. At first I was always behind the process time curve...feeling like too much was being needed to be done and too little time. Same with starting driving with a manual transmission at 15 y.o., there seemed like there was just too many variables and things to notice per unit of time. After driving for a few months, even the most rigorous twisty sport driving was a form or relaxation.
Beginners with photography face the same thing, it can seem overwhelming. But if each shot is evaluated and planned in a mental process that decides beforehand what the finished shot should look like, the actions to do it become automatic. I like manual exposure, and find it easier and presents fewer surprises in results. At first it took a long time to adjust everything and if anything changed, like the subject moving a few inches revealing a back lighting situation, it blew the shot(I use spot metering 90% of the time and do a quick scan of the scene to see what the camera has to deal with. More and more, it all seems semi-automatic, the scene usually does not fool too much as to what the real light level is just by looking at it.
All the little auto functions the body develops with experience combine to make shots more and more predictable to result in how it was imagined before releasing the shutter. Sort of like driving a stick in hectic conditions, and after a few years everything just happens when it needs to happen after visualizing the intended outcome before it happens. So, the best teacher is experience but that is sped up a lot by evaluating every shot to see how or why it was not what you intended. Every image is a teacher and textbook combined.
Random shoot and hope picture taking does not advance the learning unless evaluated constantly and making corrections to instill better habits. If not stopped immediately, bad habits or assumptions become learned and are very hard to unlearn.
If you can't figure out why something went awry, it is usually a basic fundamental concept, not a camera programming or setting problem. The basics of light waves/particles, optics and the physics involved reveals the answer and allows one to make well grounded quick diagnosis of the problem. The field curvature problem with recomposition for example would probably not stump someone who had the basics down. I see too many people assuming camera settings or features causes of common photography problems.

Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
waxart Registered since 16th Jan 2008Mon 14-Mar-11 11:34 PM
67 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#18. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 17
Mon 14-Mar-11 11:36 PM by waxart

Vallejo, US
          

Very, very helpful thread. I'm bookmarking it AND copying it to a text file.

Unfortunately, due to poor sight, wearing glasses and even with the diopter adjusted as far as it can, I often can't use the viewfinder to focus. Instead I must resort to Live View. I notice that nobody so far has made any comments about focusing in LV. Obviously, as soon as you must hold the camera away from your body, shake sets in. Whenever I can, I use a tripod or rest the camera on a wall, but frequently this is not practical. I also shoot video, which can't be done on the D7000 with your eye to the viewfinder. I have tried a number of shoulder supports, but they have proved cumbersome (and not designed for a woman's anatomy!).

I'd be grateful for any tips for steadier LV shots. Are there any women out there? This thread seems to be dominated by men (who are very helpful, however).

Ann

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                
KnightPhoto Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2006Tue 15-Mar-11 02:04 AM
4170 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#19. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 18


Alberta, CA
          

Hi Ann,

Sorry to hear about difficulties. How about one of the LCD magnifying loupes? There are some threads in the video forum with some recommendations. I plan to get one for video but it could allow you to hold the camera to your eye for still photography too.

Best regards, SteveK

'A camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.' -- Dorothea Lange
My Nikonians gallery
My Nikonians Blog

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                
agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Tue 15-Mar-11 02:25 AM
3955 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#20. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 18
Tue 15-Mar-11 02:41 AM by agitater

Toronto, CA
          

>Very, very helpful thread. I'm bookmarking it AND copying it
>to a text file.
>
>Unfortunately, due to poor sight, wearing glasses and even
>with the diopter adjusted as far as it can, I often can't use
>the viewfinder to focus.

The outer viewfinder unscrews and can be replaced with a variety of different ones for a range of diopter needs beyond the built-in adjustments.

"Steadier LV shots" are a function of a stable camera position. The finest cinematographers and videographers in the world use tripods, sandbags, weights and anything else they can think of to stabilize their cameras. Everything else is the jittery, handheld, quick-cut style that has become so popular over the past 15 years or so. But even when they're handholding, they're still using stabilizing gear so that the amount of jitter, shake and tilt can be controlled.

The Habbycam SD Camera Shoulder Support Rig works really well, as long as you also attach a Hoodman Cinema Kit (or Cinema Kit Pro). Trying to use LV to focus - essentially looking unaided at the rear LCD - while holding a heavy DSLR body and lens far enough in front of your eyes to focus them naturally is futile. The Cinema Kit is a hood/magnifier/eyepiece which quick-attaches to the back of the camera. Its eyepiece extends enough for you to comfortably keep your right eye in its viewfinder while the camera is mounted on a Habbycam (or any one of a number of other shoulder rigs).

If you really want to move/walk/jog with your DSLR while shooting video, that's the time to use LV to focus unaided. Try a rig such as the Tiffen Steadicam Merlin or the Glidecam HD-2000 Hand-Held Stabilizer. They're both really slick, easy to use and can be set up quite quickly.

If you're trying to use your DSLR to replace a camcorder, you're barking up the wrong tree. DSLR video should consist of a series of set shots from a stable, non-moving position (unless you're using a Panasonic GH2, in which case you really can treat like a really high-end camcorder).

Check out the Habbycam and the Hoodman stuff. Highly recommended.

ADDED: The diopter on the Hoodman Cinema Kit is adjustable.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                    
waxart Registered since 16th Jan 2008Tue 15-Mar-11 02:25 PM
67 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#21. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 20


Vallejo, US
          

Thanks, Howard, for your long list of suggestions for equipment to help. Unfortunately, many of them are way beyond my budget! However, my mood lifted when you mentioned the Panasonic GH2, since I have had one on order for a while now. When it comes, I will almost certainly use it as my main video camera. I will also look into getting a replacement eyepiece for the D7000. At present, I am actually having quite a lot of success with Live View focusing for stills - surprisingly. And, believe me, for stock photography I have to be an aggressive pixel-peepe
Ann

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                        
max and kate Registered since 14th Nov 2007Tue 15-Mar-11 06:39 PM
37 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#22. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 21


El Sobrante, US
          

Hi, Ann.

I, too, need more diopter adjustment than the camera provides. I don't remember the part number, but Nikon makes several strength diopters that you can use in place of the rubber eyecup. The eyecup then mounts on the back of the diopter. I use a -3 add-on diopter and get the rest of the way to -3.75 with the built-in diopter. The add on diopters are fairly inexpensive (about $30 US if I remember correctly) and do a wonderful job of solving the problem of extreme near-sightedness when using a camera. Since I don't like mashing my glasses up against the viewfinder, I found that sliding my glasses down slightly and looking into the -3.75 adjusted viewfinder worked wonders for me. Good luck.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                            
waxart Registered since 16th Jan 2008Wed 16-Mar-11 02:33 PM
67 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#26. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 22


Vallejo, US
          

Thanks for this info, Max and Kate. I am definitely going to take a look (ha ha) at this product.
Ann

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                        
gkaiseril Gold Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Tue 15-Mar-11 07:49 PM
6739 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#23. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 21
Tue 15-Mar-11 08:02 PM by gkaiseril

Chicago, US
          

Nikon has not updated |Nikon SLR Camera Viewfinder Eyepiece Application Reference but the D7000 uses the model numbers 2940-2948, that covers diopters form -5.0 to +3.0 and that does not include the use of the diopter adjustment on the camera with a range from -3 to +1. The D7000 falls into the column with the other dSLRs listed. So with a combination of the optional diopter eyepiece and the camera's internal adjustment, one can cover -8.0 to +4.0. And it may even be possible to find an optician that can grind a custom eyepiece, if not a square then a Nikon round one and you can use other Nikon adapters to fit the round custom eyepiece to the square holder.

Another item to consider is replacing the focus screen with a split prism focusing screen, like the Nikormat and other film SLR cameras have. But this modification can affect metering because of the darker center circle.

Some the DOF and focus issues is a result of the smaller sensor size, 95% view finder size.

George
My Nikonian Galleries

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                        
agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Wed 16-Mar-11 01:04 AM
3955 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#25. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 21


Toronto, CA
          

>At present, I am actually having quite a lot
>of success with Live View focusing for stills - surprisingly.
>And, believe me, for stock photography I have to be an
>aggressive pixel-peepe

Not surprising at all I think. Sounds as though you just needed a familiarization period. If you're been successfully shooting stock images, you've definitely got some game to begin with. The D7000 is in my opinion the perfect stock machine because it's so versatile and because its combination of moderate weight and size means you can carry it anywhere for any distance.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
gkaiseril Gold Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Tue 15-Mar-11 07:54 PM
6739 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#24. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 17


Chicago, US
          

Moose Peterson suggest that one sets one finger on the On/Off switch and then roll/slide the finger back onto the shutter release. It will take some practice to develop the movement, but it does remove the press or squeeze movement and the associated arm and camera movement.

George
My Nikonian Galleries

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                
drmarkf Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jun 2009Thu 17-Mar-11 06:49 AM
63 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#27. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 24


Cambridge, GB
          

This thread is a great resource. Thanks to all.

I don't think I've seen above any discussion of the lack of an AF-on button on the back of the D7000. I'm a big fan of decoupling focus from the shutter, and do this on several different camera bodies.

I'm strongly considering getting a D7000 and would be very interested in comments on this aspect of focusing from those who use them.

Regards,
Mark

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                    
briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Thu 17-Mar-11 08:27 AM
28673 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#28. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 27


Paignton, GB
          

>I don't think I've seen above any discussion of the lack of an
>AF-on button on the back of the D7000.

The D7000 Custom Settings Menu allows the user to configure the AE-L/AF-L button to act as an "AF-ON" button. This means, of course, that you can't assign it to one of its other uses, but you do have the option.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                        
drmarkf Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jun 2009Thu 17-Mar-11 05:35 PM
63 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#29. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 28


Cambridge, GB
          

>>I don't think I've seen above any discussion of the lack
>of an
>>AF-on button on the back of the D7000.
>
>The D7000 Custom Settings Menu allows the user to configure
>the AE-L/AF-L button to act as an "AF-ON" button.
>This means, of course, that you can't assign it to one of its
>other uses, but you do have the option.

Yes, I should have given a bit more detail, sorry!

I've tried out the D7k on several occasions for up to a couple of hours, and I've found the AE-L/AF-L button to be in an awkward place - I seem to end up with my thumb smudging my glasses and getting in the way of holding the camera securely against my face and of seeing through the viewfinder properly.

I don't have this problem with the D700, D300, or for example the Olympus E-620, E-1 or E-5, or with Olympus micro 4/3 bodies.

Have others found this? Does it get better with familiarity?

Many thanks.

Regards,
Mark

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                            
igordb Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Dec 2010Thu 17-Mar-11 05:46 PM
22 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#30. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 29


CA
          

I think you can assign Fn button, located on front of the body for AF-on. May be you find it more convenient.
Igor

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                                
drmarkf Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jun 2009Thu 17-Mar-11 07:54 PM
63 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#32. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 30


Cambridge, GB
          

Thanks for the Fn tip - I'll check that out.

Left, yes, very strongly! I've tried hard to switch or become ambi-optical, but it doesn't work...

(Incidentally that's one of the advantages of the micro 4/3rds electronic viewfinders - I can see well out of my right eye while framing with my left. It stops me getting run over while doing street photography )

Regards,
Mark

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                                    
igordb Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Dec 2010Thu 17-Mar-11 08:02 PM
22 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#33. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 32


CA
          

Actually, I mislead you. I tried it myself and find only AF-lock function. It is not what you are looking for.
Sorry for that,
Igor

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                                        
drmarkf Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Jun 2009Thu 17-Mar-11 08:20 PM
63 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#34. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 33


Cambridge, GB
          

No problem - I find the D7000 a bit frustrating.
I think I'm going to have to go with a mint-condition, second-hand D300 and see what future bodies feel like.
{It's not exactly a hardship, of course!]

Regards,
Mark

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                            
agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Thu 17-Mar-11 07:15 PM
3955 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#31. "RE: Follow up on focusing thread: How do you focus?"
In response to Reply # 29


Toronto, CA
          

Sounds like you're a left eye shooter.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D7100, D7000 (Public) topic #6812 Previous topic | Next topic


Take the Nikonians Tour and learn more about being a Nikonian Wiki /FAQ /Help Listen to our MP3 photography radio channels Find anything on Nikon and imaging technology - fast!

Copyright © Nikonians 2000, 2014
All Rights Reserved

Nikonians®, NikoScope® and NikoniansAcademy™ are trademarks owned by Nikonians.org.
Nikon®, Nikonos® and Nikkor® are registered trademarks of Nikon Corporation.