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Subject: "Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB" Previous topic | Next topic
simondyer Registered since 20th Jan 2011Wed 02-Mar-11 09:19 AM
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"Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB"


Banbury, Oxon, GB
          

Hi All,

I tend to shoot in JPEG as I haven't really got the time or inclination to Post-process my novice pictures!

Would it benefit me to change my settings from sRGB to AdobeRGB for better colours?

Would this affect picture processing at a store/on my Laptop?

Thanks

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB
Gamecocks Silver Member
02nd Mar 2011
1
Reply message RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB
simondyer
02nd Mar 2011
2
     Reply message RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB
Snappo Silver Member
03rd Mar 2011
3
          Reply message RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB
jackhx Gold Member
04th Mar 2011
4
               Reply message RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB
jackhx Gold Member
04th Mar 2011
5
                    Reply message RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB
simondyer
04th Mar 2011
6
Reply message RE: My advice is stick with sRGB.
Len Shepherd Gold Member
04th Mar 2011
7
Reply message RE: My advice is stick with sRGB.
luckyphoto Silver Member
04th Mar 2011
8
     Reply message RE: My advice is stick with sRGB.
agitater Gold Member
04th Mar 2011
9
          Reply message RE: My advice is stick with sRGB.
PAStime Silver Member
04th Mar 2011
10
               Reply message RE: My advice is stick with sRGB.
luckyphoto Silver Member
05th Mar 2011
11
                    Reply message RE: My advice is stick with sRGB.
PAStime Silver Member
05th Mar 2011
12
                    Reply message RE: My advice is stick with sRGB.
agitater Gold Member
05th Mar 2011
13
                    Reply message RE: My advice is stick with sRGB.
agitater Gold Member
05th Mar 2011
14

Gamecocks Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jul 2010Wed 02-Mar-11 10:31 AM
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#1. "RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB"
In response to Reply # 0


Joanna, US
          

Certainly there are more people better qualified than I, but from what I understand Adobe RGB is supposed to provide more variations of color. Your camera and printer settings should be the same for color management - each set to whatever setting you decide to chose. I talked with one store and they told me they used sRGB since most of the shots they got were JPEG.

John

Nobody should seek his own good, but the good of others. <><

  

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simondyer Registered since 20th Jan 2011Wed 02-Mar-11 10:37 AM
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#2. "RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB"
In response to Reply # 1


Banbury, Oxon, GB
          

Thanks, John!

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Snappo Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Apr 2004Thu 03-Mar-11 11:13 PM
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#3. "RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB"
In response to Reply # 2


Tulsa, US
          

My understanding is that most one-hour developers use sRGB. Assuming this is the case you will be better served with sRGB.

an old duffer with the time to have fun,
Jim

  

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jackhx Gold Member Charter MemberFri 04-Mar-11 06:01 AM
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#4. "RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB"
In response to Reply # 3


Richardson, US
          

Well, I don't hold myself out to be any kind of expert on color space, but here's my take on it. Most monitors, labs and printers work in sRGB color space, so I don't think using AdobeRGB gives you much of an advantage for the majority of what most people do with their pictures.

Now, if you are doing highly critical work and have access to monitors and printers that can take better advantage of the AdobeRGB space, then that's a different matter.

I routinely shoot in sRGB and print some on my inkjet printer and send some to a pro lab, and get great results.

That's my "practical" take on it. I'm sure we will get many more detailed opinions from those who are much more technically qualified on the issue.

Jack

  

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jackhx Gold Member Charter MemberFri 04-Mar-11 06:03 AM
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#5. "RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB"
In response to Reply # 4


Richardson, US
          

BTW, welcome to Nikonians, Simon!

Jack

  

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simondyer Registered since 20th Jan 2011Fri 04-Mar-11 11:01 AM
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#6. "RE: Shooting sRGB or AdobeRGB"
In response to Reply # 5


Banbury, Oxon, GB
          

Thanks to you all for valuable advice, I am learning good stuff all the time, here!

Simon

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003Fri 04-Mar-11 11:11 AM
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#7. "RE: My advice is stick with sRGB."
In response to Reply # 0


Yorkshire, GB
          

My advice is stick with sRGB as you want to avoid post processing.
Whilst Adobe RGB can record more colours you loose out with reduced colour saturation if you get RGB printed out by a high street lab using sRGB.
Whilst it is easy to convert RGB to sRGB (if you remember!) it is an extra post process step which you prefer to avoid.

Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

  

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luckyphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Fri 04-Mar-11 12:48 PM
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#8. "RE: My advice is stick with sRGB."
In response to Reply # 7


Port Charlotte, US
          

Here's a short tutorial on sRGB and AdobeRGB that may help.

http://www.fotohacker.com/2008/02/20/srgb-vs-adobe-rgb/

Larry

"Red is gray and yellow white, but we decide which is right
....and which is an illusion"

Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Fri 04-Mar-11 09:44 PM
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#9. "RE: My advice is stick with sRGB."
In response to Reply # 8


Toronto, CA
          

>Here's a short tutorial on sRGB and AdobeRGB that may help.
>
>http://www.fotohacker.com/2008/02/20/srgb-vs-adobe-rgb/

That Fotohacker blog post starts off well, but then gets a bit, um, murky and contains a couple of non sequiturs such as:

"Because the spectrum of color is restricted somewhat sRGB (in some ends of the spectrum) these images will typically “pop” a little more without any editing consideration. That’s because the color is not spread out over as wide an area."

The paragraph doesn't make any sense. It sounds vaguely authoritative, but it's meaningless.

The most important thing to respect when choosing a color space is to stick with it. If you set your camera to Adobe RGB, stick with it throughout your image processing, lab printing and so on. If you choose sRGB, stick with it throughout your image processing, lab printing and so on. Always work with the largest color gamut, and the largest size images captured at the highest resolution your camera can provide.

Remember too that printing is not a RGB color process - it's a CYMK+ process. As well, print gamuts are larger than image capture gamuts and display gamuts, so even when you're working with Adobe RGB or ProPhoto RGB, both of which have gamuts that many good LCD monitors can't fully display, a good third-party print lab will respect your chosen color space when they convert to CYMK TIF before printing. In many cases (when final images are printed), your original choice of Adobe RGB or ProPhoto RGB can result in more detailed and more vibrant prints.

Choice of gamut affects a number of things. Image sharpness, for example, occurs because of a confluence of several factors, among others:

Optical quality - the better the optical quality of the glass and hybrid formulae used to create the various elements in a lens, and the more carefully and accurately the lens elements are assembled and calibrated, the sharper your images can be.

Technique - proper handholding technique and proper tripod technique will contribute to the capture of sharp images.

Bit depth - the greater the bit depth captured by the camera, the more likely it is that fine detail, and transitional gradients at fine edges and in finely textured surfaces will be fully captured. The more clearly those edges and texture changes are accurately captured, the more edge and surface detail is perceived the sharper an image appears.

Gamut - color depth is a fundamental part of accurately capturing shadow detail, subtleties of some facial expression, richness of texture and many other details. Larger gamut can, with some subjects, provide a perception of greater emotion. Just as the subtle contrasts of B&W photography be used to convey dramatic expressions of emotion, so too can great color gamut contribute to the capture of the most dramatically lifelike realities.

Contrast - lens coatings and glass formulae contribute to the ability of a sensor to capture contrast, edge definition and accurate gamut. The more accurate the contrast throughout an image, the more desirable sharpness is perceived.

I think it's always true that greater gamut - and the same gamut throughout the image processing and printing workflow - is better. So I think also that it is your needs, subject matter and print requirements which should dictate your choice of gamut. Depending on the subject matter, B&W might sometimes be vastly better than even the widest color gamut at the highest resolution, size and bit depth. There is no "best" generally - only your needs.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

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PAStime Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Feb 2009Fri 04-Mar-11 10:46 PM
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#10. "RE: My advice is stick with sRGB."
In response to Reply # 9


Kingston, CA
          

Nicely explained Howard!

Agreed with previous posts: if you are minimizing your time and bother with post-processing, you don't want to get into color space management and conversion. You can obtain excellent results using sRGB. The potential of improvements by using aRGB are subtle. Peter

  

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luckyphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Sat 05-Mar-11 12:24 AM
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#11. "RE: My advice is stick with sRGB."
In response to Reply # 10


Port Charlotte, US
          

Howard - Agreed, the post provided was not the best. The main point was to emphasize (in a short, simpler tutorial) that 8-bit JPEG photos will not benefit from a larger AdobeRGB color space.

That's what happens when you skim tutorials. My speed-reading skills must be slipping.

Peter summed it up nicely, set everything to sRGB and don't worry about it.

Larry

"Red is gray and yellow white, but we decide which is right
....and which is an illusion"

Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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PAStime Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Feb 2009Sat 05-Mar-11 12:27 AM
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#12. "RE: My advice is stick with sRGB."
In response to Reply # 11


Kingston, CA
          


>Peter summed it up nicely, set everything to sRGB and don't
>worry about it.

Heh - I was just repeating what Len said

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Sat 05-Mar-11 12:49 AM
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#13. "RE: My advice is stick with sRGB."
In response to Reply # 12


Toronto, CA
          

>
>>Peter summed it up nicely, set everything to sRGB and
>don't
>>worry about it.
>
>Heh - I was just repeating what Len said

Len is wise.

sRGB is a perfectly decent choice. The OP should just stick with it - no conversions, no vacillating back and forth between gamuts. Once the choice is made, all that's left is to concentrate on making good photos!

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Sat 05-Mar-11 12:53 AM
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#14. "RE: My advice is stick with sRGB."
In response to Reply # 11


Toronto, CA
          

>Howard - Agreed, the post provided was not the best. The main
>point was to emphasize (in a short, simpler tutorial) that
>8-bit JPEG photos will not benefit from a larger AdobeRGB
>color space.

Of course you're right, and I should have agreed with the point. Going for the gamut by shooting NEF or JPG+NEF is, I think, one way for the OP to get the best of both worlds.

>That's what happens when you skim tutorials. My speed-reading
>skills must be slipping.

You can't mention slipping skills! Never talk about the slipping skills! Bad luck! Jinx!

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

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