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Subject: "Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting" Previous topic | Next topic
b1234s Registered since 05th Dec 2010Sat 08-Jan-11 07:39 PM
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"Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"


Winter Garden, US
          

I am shooting in a dark bowling alley. I want to freeze the action and not use flash.
When I select ISO sensitivity settings here is what my next screen shows:

ISO sensitivity - 200
Auto ISO sensitivity control: On
Max Sensitivity : 3200
Min Shutter Speed: 1/200

Now for this to work with this settings do I need to have the dial set for: Auto. Of course this would cause the flash to go off which I don't want. So do I set the dial to no flash.

I did take photos with the settings but looking at them later I notice some were taken at a shutter speed of 1/60 although I have a Min Shutter Speed of 1/200 selected. I did go back and fourth between Auto and P so maybe this is where I am confused.

One other question. At the above settings does this mean I would shot at a min ISO of 200 and a maximum of 3200?

Thanks.

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
briantilley Moderator
08th Jan 2011
1
Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
kentak Silver Member
09th Jan 2011
2
Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
briantilley Moderator
09th Jan 2011
3
     Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
kentak Silver Member
10th Jan 2011
4
          Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
briantilley Moderator
10th Jan 2011
5
               Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
b1234s
10th Jan 2011
6
                    Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
kentak Silver Member
10th Jan 2011
9
Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
agitater Gold Member
10th Jan 2011
7
Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
b1234s
10th Jan 2011
8
Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
kentak Silver Member
11th Jan 2011
10
Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
agitater Gold Member
11th Jan 2011
11
Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
JohnE Nikon Silver Member
11th Jan 2011
12
     Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
jmiguez Silver Member
12th Jan 2011
13
          Reply message RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting
JohnE Nikon Silver Member
12th Jan 2011
14

briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Sat 08-Jan-11 07:53 PM
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#1. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 0


Paignton, GB
          

Your chosen Auto ISO settings will apply in Auto and P, S, A and M modes on the dial. The camera will use a shutter speed below your specified minimum rather than an ISO setting above your specified maximum. To put it another way, the Maximum ISO is a "definite", but the minimum shutter speed is a "preferred" setting.

Regarding your second question, Auto ISO can adjust the ISO downwards as well as upwards. With your settings, it will go down to 100 if the lighting is too bright to give a correct exposure at ISO 200.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Sun 09-Jan-11 01:11 AM
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#2. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 09-Jan-11 01:12 AM by kentak

US
          

If I could offer a suggestion. Instead of trying to control the shutter speed via the minimum shutter speed in the ISO setting menu, why not just use S (shutter priority) mode? In other words, enable auto ISO, but set the minimum shutter speed for the slowest speed you feel you are able to hand hold for a given situation/lens combination. Then, when you are in a situation such as you described (low light, freeze action w/o flash), it's a simple mater to switch to S mode and dial in your 1/200 (or whatever) and let the camera set the f-stop and ISO as needed. Also, if checking the monitor shows you need to increase the shutter speed, it's a lot easier to just dial it rather than going back to the ISO settings menu to do so.

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Sun 09-Jan-11 08:35 AM
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#3. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 2


Paignton, GB
          

>If I could offer a suggestion. Instead of trying to control
>the shutter speed via the minimum shutter speed in the ISO
>setting menu, why not just use S (shutter priority) mode? In
>other words, enable auto ISO, but set the minimum shutter
>speed for the slowest speed you feel you are able to hand hold
>for a given situation/lens combination.

Doing it that way, you lose control over the aperture setting. The camera will always open the aperture up to maximum, then start raising the ISO. Often, we want to shoot at a particular aperture setting for reasons of sharpness or depth of field.

If we want to control aperture AND shutter speed ourselves, then Manual (M) Mode with Auto ISO enabled is the way to go.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Mon 10-Jan-11 01:37 AM
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#4. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 3


US
          

But, Brian, what advice did you give to the OP that would have enabled him to control aperture? He said he was using either Auto or P mode, which wouldn't have done so.

My advice, which was intended for the dark bowling alley situation specifically, was to use S mode because his post indicated to me shutter speed was his priority. I probably also estimated his level of camera control sophistication conservatively, and I'm not sure using M mode wouldn't have complicated his considerations.

Besides, I don't think I was wrong to try to steer him away from the use of the Auto ISO menu for shutter speed control in this situation in favor of the less cumbersome S mode. Had initial shot shown 1/200 was inadequate, he would have had to dive into the menu to change it instead of making a simple dial click or two.

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Mon 10-Jan-11 08:16 AM
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#5. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 4


Paignton, GB
          

I didn't say your suggestion was wrong - just pointing out a disadvantage of doing it that way, that you didn't mention.

In A Mode, the shutter speed stays above your specified minimum unless the ISO hits your specified maximum - if you were is S Mode when that happens, there would be nowhere for the camera to go and images would be underexposed.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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b1234s Registered since 05th Dec 2010Mon 10-Jan-11 05:45 PM
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#6. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 5


Winter Garden, US
          


>
>In A Mode, the shutter speed stays above your specified
>minimum unless the ISO hits your specified maximum - if you
>were is S Mode when that happens, there would be nowhere for
>the camera to go and images would be underexposed.

That is exactly what happened. All photos were underexposed so I assumed if I had used the A mode instead of the S mode I would have gotten better results.

  

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Mon 10-Jan-11 11:54 PM
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#9. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

>
>>
>>In A Mode, the shutter speed stays above your specified
>>minimum unless the ISO hits your specified maximum - if
>you
>>were is S Mode when that happens, there would be nowhere
>for
>>the camera to go and images would be underexposed.
>
>That is exactly what happened. All photos were underexposed
>so I assumed if I had used the A mode instead of the S mode I
>would have gotten better results.

Nowhere in your post did you say you used S mode. Did you?

According to Brian, had you used S mode in insufficient light, the aperture would have opened wide, the ISO would have hit your max, and you would have gotten underexposed images--with motion frozen as you wanted. Had you used A mode in insufficient light, the ISO would have hit max, your shutter speed would have slowed, and you would have gotten blurred subjects, possibly with better exposure. Unless of course your aperture was already wide open, in which case you would have gotten blurred subjects and underexposed images.

If there had been *sufficient* light, either S, or A, or P, or M mode might have given satisfactory results.

Am I wrong, Brian?

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Mon 10-Jan-11 07:35 PM
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#7. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 10-Jan-11 07:38 PM by agitater

Toronto, CA
          

In the Auto ISO menu, the Minimum Shutter Speed setting simply tells the camera the lowest shutter speed to use before increasing ISO to accomplish a good exposure. It does NOT mean the camera won't ever use a slower shutter speed. So all you're setting is the trigger point at which the camera will automatically begin increasing ISO as needed.

Here's an example. If you're in Aperture Priority and your maximum ISO in the Auto ISO Menu is set to 3200 and the camera ramps ISO up to 3200 but still doesn't like the exposure, it will slow the shutter in order to try and achieve an acceptable exposure. The camera doesn't know you want a fast shutter or a specific shutter speed unless you set it to Shutter Priority. Remember that the camera can't tell an action subject from a still subject or a still person from a still doorstop.

The nice thing about bowling alleys, aside from bowling itself, is that the lighting never varies from one moment to the next. If you want to freeze a particular bowler in mid-release, forget about Auto ISO. Instead, use the camera to get a meter reading of the general subject and shooting area. Then set your shutter and aperture fast enough to freeze the ball in mid-release and keep the background soft. Try a few shots, manually adjusting your ISO and eV to get the best exposure.

Before you do anything though, do a custom white balance in order to accurately capture colors.

It's digital. Experiment with settings. It's not like you're chewing through roll after roll of film. Check your histogram after each shot, and once you're satisfied with the exposures, fire away.

I think Auto ISO is most useful in situations where light is constantly changing (e.g., the sun being obscured and revealed alternately by clouds) or where you're constantly in & out of building shade or where artificial lighting is shifting unexpectedly. Under controlled indoor lighting though - such as a bowling alley - using Auto ISO may actually be counterproductive. Basically, all features aren't useful in all circumstances.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

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b1234s Registered since 05th Dec 2010Mon 10-Jan-11 08:25 PM
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#8. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 7


Winter Garden, US
          

>In the Auto ISO menu, the Minimum Shutter Speed setting
>simply tells the camera the lowest shutter speed to use before
>increasing ISO to accomplish a good exposure. It does NOT mean
>the camera won't ever use a slower shutter speed. So all
>you're setting is the trigger point at which the camera will
>automatically begin increasing ISO as needed.
>

This is very helpful. Thanks very much.

  

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Tue 11-Jan-11 12:23 AM
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#10. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 7


US
          

Howard,

Your first two paragraphs explain why I suggested S mode to the OP. Other than M mode, it's the only way to ensure the OP gets the motion freezing 1/200 he said was his priority. If the OP has sufficient working knowledge of DOF, he would set an appropriate aperture.

Your third paragraph is the ideal suggestion. I made some assumptions about the OP's level of practical knowledge from his first post and suggested something I thought would work with minimum fussing. If I'm underestimated his knowledge--I apologize for that.

  

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agitater Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Jan 2007Tue 11-Jan-11 01:25 AM
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#11. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 10


Toronto, CA
          


>Your third paragraph is the ideal suggestion. I made some
>assumptions about the OP's level of practical knowledge from
>his first post and suggested something I thought would work
>with minimum fussing. If I'm underestimated his knowledge--I
>apologize for that.

Yikes don't apologize. I don't know anything about the OP's photography knowledge either. We often respond to an OP's question, each of us using slightly different language and slightly different approaches. Eventually, one of us manages to hit the sweet spot of understanding for an OP.

My Nikonians Gallery

Howard Carson, Managing Editor
Kickstartnews Inc. - http://www.kickstartnews.com

  

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JohnE Nikon Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jun 2010Tue 11-Jan-11 02:59 PM
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#12. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 7


New HArtford, US
          


>
>I think Auto ISO is most useful in situations where light is
>constantly changing (e.g., the sun being obscured and revealed
>alternately by clouds) or where you're constantly in & out
>of building shade or where artificial lighting is shifting
>unexpectedly. Under controlled indoor lighting though - such
>as a bowling alley - using Auto ISO may actually be
>counterproductive. Basically, all features aren't useful in
>all circumstances.
>


I have found auto iso helpful even in relatively controlled lighting conditions. Sometimes light will more directly shine on subject and allow lower iso. For example while bowling subject may move in and out of areas of slightly better or worse light. I like your suggestion of manual but have found light with moving subjects is rarely stable/ controlled.

One more thought for OP. I would rather have a little noise than blurry pictures and would suggest you up your max iso. I keep mine on Hi when I use it and have gotten some very usable images with iso>25,000 especially with a little noise reduction applied in post. When using iso in the stratosphere I find that white balance has a lot to do with perceived results and often will have to cool it down in post.

Our family Christmas card picture used an iso of 6400 on the D5000 and the final result on the card looked near perfect. A couple friends who are photographers were amazed.

Good luck and don't forget to have fun while experimenting.

JohnE Nikon
https://plus.google.com/photos/104310967428146619677/albums?hl=en

https://picasaweb.google.com/104310967428146619677


"Cameras and lenses are simply tools to place our unique vision on film. Concentrate on equipment and you'll take technically good photographs. Concentrate on seeing the light's magic colors and your images will stir the soul." Jack Dykinga

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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jmiguez Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2010Wed 12-Jan-11 11:13 AM
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#13. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 12


Lafayette, US
          

This thread is one of the reasons I keep coming here and reading. I can read the manual or maybe a book by someone like Thom Hogan on camera operation and think, "Ok, I understand this." However, it is when reading a situation like the OP stated and then seeing the different ideas and suggestions you guys post that I feel I am learning a real world lesson, rather than something from a book.

This reminds me of when I first learned to fly many, many years ago. Old timers, many of them WWII pilots, use to sit around and just "hanger talk" or "What if." I learned many a lesson back then that was later useful. I see this site as a series of hanger talks.

Thank you for all the advice you guys freely offer.

John

John

My Pictures may be seen here: http://jmiguez.smugmug.com/

  

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JohnE Nikon Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jun 2010Wed 12-Jan-11 02:52 PM
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#14. "RE: Confused on ISO Sensitivity Setting"
In response to Reply # 13


New HArtford, US
          

John,
I completely agree.
Joining Nikonians has been my most rewarding and cost effective investment since beginning photography.
I feel like I have professional and enthusiast photographers on retainer with my membership. This community is more helpful than any other photography website that I have experienced.

JohnE Nikon
https://plus.google.com/photos/104310967428146619677/albums?hl=en

https://picasaweb.google.com/104310967428146619677


"Cameras and lenses are simply tools to place our unique vision on film. Concentrate on equipment and you'll take technically good photographs. Concentrate on seeing the light's magic colors and your images will stir the soul." Jack Dykinga

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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