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Subject: "D7000 AF Fine Tune" Previous topic | Next topic
metta10 Gold Member Nikonian since 05th Feb 2012Wed 02-Apr-14 02:59 PM
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"D7000 AF Fine Tune"


Springfield, US
          

I have been trying to realign a Nikon 24-70 F2.8 I have tested many defaults from -20 to +20 and have it down to 0 and -5. I am now trying to further narrow it down to one number. All of a sudden no matter where I set the tune they all come out as zero! Any ideas what is wrong and how to correct this?

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
JosephK Silver Member
02nd Apr 2014
1
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
vema
12th Apr 2014
2
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
Asgard Administrator
12th Apr 2014
3
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
luckyphoto Silver Member
13th Apr 2014
4
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
Ellis Feibush Silver Member
14th Apr 2014
5
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
mdallie Silver Member
16th Apr 2014
10
     Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
Ellis Feibush Silver Member
18th Apr 2014
11
          Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
westcoast Silver Member
19th Apr 2014
12
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
martinjp22
16th Apr 2014
6
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
Giltic
16th Apr 2014
7
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
JohnE Nikon Silver Member
16th Apr 2014
9
Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
Giltic
16th Apr 2014
8
     Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
sumankdas
21st Apr 2014
13
          Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
JosephK Silver Member
21st Apr 2014
14
          Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
JohnE Nikon Silver Member
21st Apr 2014
15
               Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
sumankdas
21st Apr 2014
16
                    Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
JohnE Nikon Silver Member
21st Apr 2014
17
                    Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
sumankdas
22nd Apr 2014
18
                    Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
elec164 Silver Member
22nd Apr 2014
19
                         Reply message RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune
sumankdas
22nd Apr 2014
20

JosephK Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his excellent and frequent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community in the Nikonians spirit. Nikonian since 17th Apr 2006Wed 02-Apr-14 05:43 PM
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#1. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 0


Seattle, WA, US
          

The first thing to check is to make sure you did not turn off the fine-tune system.

---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
Joseph K
Seattle, WA, USA

D700, D200, D70S, 24-70mm f/2.8, VR 70-200mm f/2.8 II, TC20e3,
50mm f/1.4 D, 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 DX

  

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vema Registered since 12th Apr 2014Sat 12-Apr-14 09:06 PM
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#2. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 0


CS
          

No need to use the function.
Be sure what to shoot properly. Hold your breath when you shoot.

  

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Asgard Administrator He is your Chief Guardian Angel at the Helpdesk and knows a lot about a lot Nikonian since 07th Apr 2004Sat 12-Apr-14 09:37 PM
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#3. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 0


East Frisia, DE
          

Why do you use the AF fine tune ? Is there a reason ?

I have never used it. Camera and lenses are OK and sharp.

Gerold - Nikonian in East Frisia
Eala Freya Fresena

  

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luckyphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Sun 13-Apr-14 12:21 PM
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#4. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 13-Apr-14 12:22 PM by luckyphoto

Port Charlotte, US
          

Welcome to the Nikonians.

"I am now trying to further narrow it down to one number."

If you find out how to do that please let the rest of us know. (lol)

The focus variability of a zoom lens at different focal lengths will require slightly different AF Fine tune numbers. That's normal with a zoom lens. The best you can do is select an average value between the high and low numbers.

Of my three lenses, only one required AF Fine Tune. The others tested out at zero.

Good luck.

Larry

"Red is gray and yellow white, but we decide which is right
....and which is an illusion"

Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin

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Ellis Feibush Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Sep 2009Mon 14-Apr-14 09:39 AM
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#5. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 0


Summit, US
          

In the years I've owned my D7000 I have never,ever had any focus issues, until very recently. On a recent Caribbean vacation all of a sudden none of my lenses could focus properly. All images were soft in the center at infinity especially at the wide end of my lenses.
A very experienced photo store employee put me wise to the problem and its solution. He tried my new 18-140mm lens on a brand new D5200. It worked very well. fast and accurate focus. On my D7000 it focused very slowly and not very sharp. Obviously the camera was the problem.
Long story short: took a white, poly eraser and cleaned the much oxidized contacts. When I got home I also thoroughly cleaned the camera's contacts with Deoxit electrical contact cleaner (available at Radio Shack). Joila! This wonderful camera performed like brand new with all my lenses, even an old 50mm, f1.4 D lens. Focus was spot on and very fast.
Also check to see that the contact pins on your lenses are going in and out and also clean the contacts on each lens.
A Nikon rep once told me that it's not the best idea to keep lenses on your camera bodies. Though inconvenient, this practice prematurely wears out the springs under the contacts on lenses.
My point is, always look for the simple solution. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. I do know this one fact,I was just about to send my D7000 in to Nikon for repair, however, I just avoided a $249.00 repair bill and my D7000 is working like a champ. I just lately do a lot of on location informal portraits and these images are all tack sharp. AF fine tune is a feature you rarely ever have to use IMHO.

efeibush

  

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mdallie Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jan 2011Wed 16-Apr-14 03:35 PM
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#10. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 5


Novi, US
          

Thanks, Ellis, for that "simple" but great solution!!

Mike

  

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Ellis Feibush Silver Member Nikonian since 08th Sep 2009Fri 18-Apr-14 12:21 AM
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#11. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 10


Summit, US
          

You're welcome Mike.

efeibush

  

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westcoast Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Jan 2007Sat 19-Apr-14 08:06 PM
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#12. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 11


California, US
          

To answer your original question of why it might show a 0 value in NX, if you have already entered in a lens in AF fine tune and then change the saved value to zero. It will use the saved value of zero and not the default value. So don't test by changing the default value, test by changing the saved value.

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Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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martinjp22 Registered since 27th Mar 2014Wed 16-Apr-14 02:53 AM
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#6. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 0


Troy, US
          

If you have a good camera repair shop nearby you could have them do it. I took my lenses and D7100 into a local repair shop that is authorized to do Nikon warranty repairs and they only charged $10 each to do micro adjustment on the two lenses that were more than a year old. One ended up at +1 and the other at -4. For $20 I saved hours of trying to do it myself and still not knowing if I did it correctly.

  

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Giltic Registered since 11th Nov 2013Wed 16-Apr-14 09:35 AM
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#7. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 6


SI
          

Af fine tune is there to use it if needed.
I have 4 lenses and two of them needed AF fine tune on my D7100.
One of the simplest test is to compare photos done with live-view with the photos done through the view-finder (camera on the tripod, mirror up,good light, …etc). If both photos have the same level of sharpness then AF fine tune is not needed. But if there is a difference in sharpness, then AF fine tune could solve the problem. Of course, there is also a chance, that something is wrong with the focusing system.
Here are my AF fine tune results on D7100:
-Nikon 35mm f1.8 : no AF fine tune needed
-Nikon 50mm f1.8 : +5 AF fine tune
-Nikon 35-70mm f2.8 : +11 AF fine tune
-Nikon 18-105 kit lens : no AF fine tune needed

One question that bothers me for a long time:
So; how do we know, if our photos are sharp? Can we measure the sharpness at home without the proper equipment?
I was reading that Nikon 50mm f1.8 is sharp at f1.8 and it gets sharper when closing the aperture. So, if it's sharper at f5.6, how could be also sharp at f1.8? Where is the limit, when the photo is still sharp?
Is it OK to be just sharp or should it be »tack« sharp? How sharp is »tack« sharp?
If I shoot a flower with f1.8 and then the same flower with f5.6 and then compare both photos, the first photo won't be as sharp as the second. Is then the first photo blurry?
Someone might say: »My photos are sharp without AF fine tune«. Are they sharp as Nikon 50mm at f5.6 or they are »just« sharp as Nikon 50mm at f1.8? Are they tack sharp? How much sharper (as Nikon 50mm at f5.6) is »tack« sharp then?

  

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JohnE Nikon Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jun 2010Wed 16-Apr-14 01:46 PM
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#9. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 7


New HArtford, US
          

Sharpness is relative. Your goal should be to get the sharpest image you can out of each lens. This is easier to detect when shooting wide open. Your lenses while being sharp wide open will not be as sharp as they are when stopped down a few stops.

You can print lens test charts from online sources and experiment. If you are shooting wide open and can get a sharper image with fine tuning turned on, you should use it. About half of my lenses require some degree of fine tuning for maximal sharpness.

I have noticed that with some lenses -10 or 20 barely affect image while other are affected a lot by a change of 5. It is often very difficult to decide between 2 close numbers. Like -4 compared to -5. When you test make sure you have good light. Use a tripod and take at least 3 shots at each fine tuning increment to avoid inconsistencies.

There is a lot online about how to do it or you can purchase products that may make your job easier.

JohnE Nikon
https://plus.google.com/photos/104310967428146619677/albums?hl=en

https://picasaweb.google.com/104310967428146619677


"Cameras and lenses are simply tools to place our unique vision on film. Concentrate on equipment and you'll take technically good photographs. Concentrate on seeing the light's magic colors and your images will stir the soul." Jack Dykinga

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Giltic Registered since 11th Nov 2013Wed 16-Apr-14 09:35 AM
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#8. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 6


SI
          

Af fine tune is there to use it if needed.
I have 4 lenses and two of them needed AF fine tune on my D7100.
One of the simplest test is to compare photos done with live-view with the photos done through the view-finder (camera on the tripod, mirror up,good light, …etc). If both photos have the same level of sharpness then AF fine tune is not needed. But if there is a difference in sharpness, then AF fine tune could solve the problem. Of course, there is also a chance, that something is wrong with the focusing system.
Here are my AF fine tune results on D7100:
-Nikon 35mm f1.8 : no AF fine tune needed
-Nikon 50mm f1.8 : +5 AF fine tune
-Nikon 35-70mm f2.8 : +11 AF fine tune
-Nikon 18-105 kit lens : no AF fine tune needed

One question that bothers me for a long time:
So; how do we know, if our photos are sharp? Can we measure the sharpness at home without the proper equipment?
I was reading that Nikon 50mm f1.8 is sharp at f1.8 and it gets sharper when closing the aperture. So, if it's sharper at f5.6, how could be also sharp at f1.8? Where is the limit, when the photo is still sharp?
Is it OK to be just sharp or should it be »tack« sharp? How sharp is »tack« sharp?
If I shoot a flower with f1.8 and then the same flower with f5.6 and then compare both photos, the first photo won't be as sharp as the second. Is then the first photo blurry?
Someone might say: »My photos are sharp without AF fine tune«. Are they sharp as Nikon 50mm at f5.6 or they are »just« sharp as Nikon 50mm at f1.8? Are they tack sharp? How much sharper (as Nikon 50mm at f5.6) is »tack« sharp then?

  

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sumankdas Registered since 12th Jan 2014Mon 21-Apr-14 07:14 AM
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#13. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 8


GB
          

I only have the 35mm f1.8 DX lens which is always fixed on my D7000.
In auto focus some of my pictures focuses either left or right of the subject.
There must be something I am doing wrong.

Also when I press the info button, I see the focus point white dot has shifted to the left.


Do I need to regularly clean the lens and camera contacts?

Thank you.
Suman

  

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JosephK Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his excellent and frequent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community in the Nikonians spirit. Nikonian since 17th Apr 2006Mon 21-Apr-14 09:17 AM
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#14. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 13


Seattle, WA, US
          

What are the focus settings you have chosen and which focus point do you normally choose?

---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
Joseph K
Seattle, WA, USA

D700, D200, D70S, 24-70mm f/2.8, VR 70-200mm f/2.8 II, TC20e3,
50mm f/1.4 D, 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 DX

  

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JohnE Nikon Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jun 2010Mon 21-Apr-14 03:19 PM
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#15. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 13


New HArtford, US
          

>I only have the 35mm f1.8 DX lens which is always fixed on my
>D7000.
>In auto focus some of my pictures focuses either left or right
>of the subject.
>There must be something I am doing wrong.
>
>Also when I press the info button, I see the focus point white
>dot has shifted to the left.

This is a good reason not to use autofocus.

the camera often is not smart enough to know what your intended subject is. Try Af S focus and choose your focus with the pad behind camera. It should work. there likely is no problem.

I did find that there was more focus hunting with the 35mm 1.8 DX than with any of my other primes. Not sure if this is widely known or just particular to my lens camera combination.

JohnE Nikon
https://plus.google.com/photos/104310967428146619677/albums?hl=en

https://picasaweb.google.com/104310967428146619677


"Cameras and lenses are simply tools to place our unique vision on film. Concentrate on equipment and you'll take technically good photographs. Concentrate on seeing the light's magic colors and your images will stir the soul." Jack Dykinga

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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sumankdas Registered since 12th Jan 2014Mon 21-Apr-14 09:08 PM
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#16. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 15


GB
          


Dear Joseph and John,

Thank you for reading my post.
Generally use AF-A.

Please take a look at this picture, everything appears out of focus.


Not sure what I did wrong.

Thank you.
Suman

  

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JohnE Nikon Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jun 2010Mon 21-Apr-14 09:32 PM
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#17. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 16


New HArtford, US
          

I can't tell. What was shutter speed and aperture? Did you get focus lock? Try changing your focus mode like I suggested to narrow down problem.

JohnE Nikon
https://plus.google.com/photos/104310967428146619677/albums?hl=en

https://picasaweb.google.com/104310967428146619677


"Cameras and lenses are simply tools to place our unique vision on film. Concentrate on equipment and you'll take technically good photographs. Concentrate on seeing the light's magic colors and your images will stir the soul." Jack Dykinga

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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sumankdas Registered since 12th Jan 2014Tue 22-Apr-14 05:15 AM
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#18. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 17


GB
          

Dear Joseph,

I will use AF-S and see my results.
You are right, I don't have focussing issues with manual focus.

Many thanks again for your advice.
Suman

  

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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Tue 22-Apr-14 01:20 PM
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#19. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 16


US
          

>Please take a look at this picture, everything appears out of
>focus.
>
>Not sure what I did wrong.


Suman, the EXIF data is stripped from the image, but the information you keyed into the gallery states that you used the 35mm DX f/1.8 lens at f/2.8. And it appears by the subject that you may have been near the closest focus distance which would give you a very narrow DOF.

In a subject such as that, AF will have a hard time in that there are multiple potential targets at varying distances and it may not pick out what you wish (especially given the narrow DOF). But if I look carefully, I can pick out isolated areas that appear relatively sharp (also verifying the narrow DOF). The upper right corner is almost relatively sharp, but being that corners of the frame are softer than the center, it's hard to say. But about a 1/4 of the way down from the top right, there is a stem that looks sharp, and you can follow it in and it is sharp.

When testing AF you need to have a flat target parallel to the imaging plane and of high enough contrast to remove as many variables as possible.

Also I notice you listed that you used a UV filter also. I recently had an experience where I rented a lens thinking I might replace and trade in one of my Nikkor's for a Sigma. I was comparing equal shots side by side and they were very close in image quality, but overall I felt the Sigma was a bit sharper. But then I noticed there was a Hoya UV On the rental. I removed it and the sharpness improved significantly. I tried my Promaster UV on it just to see (the filter size is the same as one I had) and I didn't notice the dramatic difference in image quality that I noticed with the Hoya. So I would also take the filter off when you are testing to see if it is affecting your image quality.

Pete

Pete

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sumankdas Registered since 12th Jan 2014Tue 22-Apr-14 09:41 PM
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#20. "RE: D7000 AF Fine Tune"
In response to Reply # 19


GB
          

Dear Pete,

Thank you for taking time to review my photo.
Now I understand why the image is so blurry as the camera could not choose a distinct focus point.

In the next picture , the flower is in focus and the rest blurred as now the camera could easily focus on the main subject.

I will definitely try taking the filter off when I take photos next time.

Many thanks again for your kind help.

Regards,
Suman

  

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