Go to a  "printer friendly" view of this message which allow an easy print Printer-friendly copy Go to the page which allows you to send this topic link and a message to a friend Email this topic to a friend
Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D7100, D7000 (Public) topic #32267
View in linear mode

Subject: "D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, s..." Previous topic | Next topic
goodguy Registered since 01st Sep 2013Fri 24-Jan-14 01:29 AM
45 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
"D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"


CA
          

Since I set foot the DSLR realm I hear one this again and again.
Get good glass before you get a new body, glass is more important the body.
Never was a good listener, I sold my first camera and got Nikon D7000.
But the results were not impressive, it was ok and in the first few months I thought I was doing something wrong.
I got the Nikon 50mm 1.8G which is cheap but very sharp but still pictures were not sharp.
Instead the kit lens (18-105mm VR) I got the 24-85mm 3.5-4.5 VR and with this lens I got the best results but still they were not at the level I was looking for.

Eventually after a long battle I gave up and got my D7100.
The difference was noticeable right from the get go, the D7100 produced very sharp picture with almost all my lenses (except the 50mm 1.8G) so I sold it and bought the 50mm 1.4D and the skies were smiling at me, when set to 2.8 or higher this lens produces very, very sharp images and few days ago I added my latest addition the Nikon 24-70mm 2.8G
I must say the D7100 simply shines, the sharpness with this lens and the 50mm is simply amazing, it is so much fun and so satisfying to get (at last) the results I was dreaming of for so long.

I am in photography heaven

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
LightMeter Silver Member
24th Jan 2014
1
Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
briantilley Moderator
24th Jan 2014
2
Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
rstcso Gold Member
24th Jan 2014
3
Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
goodguy
24th Jan 2014
4
     Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
gfinlayson Silver Member
25th Jan 2014
5
     Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
km6xz Moderator
26th Jan 2014
6
     Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
Holmes375 Silver Member
26th Jan 2014
7
     Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
goodguy
27th Jan 2014
8
     Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
briantilley Moderator
27th Jan 2014
9
          Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
gfinlayson Silver Member
27th Jan 2014
10
               Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
km6xz Moderator
28th Jan 2014
11
                    Reply message RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create shar...
goodguy
31st Jan 2014
12

LightMeter Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Oct 2011Fri 24-Jan-14 02:31 AM
743 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#1. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 24-Jan-14 02:32 AM by LightMeter

Houston, Texas, US
          

I just got the D7100 to replace the D300(but I'll be keeping the D300). The 24 MP and lack of AA filter does produce some super sharp images. But that's not why I got it. I wanted a new camera to replace my aging one. It has some goodies the D300 doesn't have-video capability, virtual horizon level in viewfinder, and a few others. Most of my lenses are older ones that are not all that sharp by today's pixel peeping standards(see my profile). But I'm happy with the images the older lenses produce. There's much more than sharpness to getting a good picture that we all love. And bad techniques can cause a lack of sharpness with any gear.

Bill

**D7100** D300, N6006, N2000, N6000, N5005, black F2 Photomic, chrome F2AS, black Nikomat FTN, and a few non Nikons

So many cameras, so little time....

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Fri 24-Jan-14 08:39 AM
28333 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#2. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 0


Paignton, GB
          

It's good that you're happy with your new kit - but there's no reason why the D7000 and 50/1.8 could not have produced great results too - perhaps one or both was faulty in some way?

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
rstcso Gold Member Nikonian since 17th Oct 2013Fri 24-Jan-14 08:54 AM
602 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#3. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 2


Round Rock, US
          

>but there's no reason why the D7000 and 50/1.8 could not have produced great results too

I agree, Brian, but my experience going from the D7000 to D7100 has been the same a Amir's. Most pictures just look a little better. Perhaps it's the rose-colored glasses that came with the D7100?

Regards,
Brent

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
goodguy Registered since 01st Sep 2013Fri 24-Jan-14 01:35 PM
45 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#4. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 2


CA
          

>It's good that you're happy with your new kit - but there's
>no reason why the D7000 and 50/1.8 could not have produced
>great results too - perhaps one or both was faulty in some
>way?
Yes there was a focusing problem with my D7000, I read this is a rather known issue with this camera, it never seemed to focus 100%
First I thought it was me so I researched and researched and tried every trick in the book to be sure it wasn't operator fault and once I knew its not me I took the camera to Nikon.
It actually improved the focus but pictures were still soft to I fine tuned all my lenses to my camera with varying success.
My Nikon 24-85mm VR seemed to be the best, others not so much and the 50mm 1.8G was the worst with no real improvement.
Still most the pictures were too soft to my high demand so I gave up and bought the D7100.
Right in the first picture I could see the difference, I checked old D7K pictures and compared to the ones I got with the D7100 and WOW what a difference.
Pictures with the 50mm 1.8G sadly were still soft so I went and bought a 50mm 1.4D and halleluiah perfection at last
The 50mm 1.8G was gone soon after that!

Now I can relax and focus my mind on composition without worrying if I will get a soft picture or not and when I do get a soft picture I know its the dummy behind the camera fault and not the camera LOL

I tip my hat to Nikon, the D7100 really is a whole lot of camera for its price!!!

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
gfinlayson Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Jan 2011Sat 25-Jan-14 05:16 PM
243 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#5. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 4
Sat 25-Jan-14 05:30 PM by gfinlayson

Maidenhead, GB
          

Hmmmm, I'm a little surprised at your experiences. I had 2 D7000s for a while and they were great. Upgraded one to the D7100 last year, and then later upgraded the other to a D800.

The D7000 RAW files look softer straight out of the camera than the D7100 files (AA vs no AA) , but with a little sharpening they make really nice prints at 30" x 20".

In terms of sharpness, there's nothing to pick between the 50mm f/1.8G and the 50mm f/1.4D. Neither is particularly sharp wide open, but by f/2.8 they're both excellent. If your G was performing that badly, then I suspect you had a lemon.....

For an objective comparison, try
DxOMark 50mm f/1.4 D vs 50mm f/1.8 G

The 1.4D scores slightly higher because it has a faster aperture, but if you look at the specs, the G actually performs very slightly better (sharper wide open and slightly less CA)...

In some ways I regret not keeping a D7000 - I prefer the image rendering from the Sony Exmor sensor of the D7000 to the rendering of the Toshiba sensor in the D7100. Sure, 24MP makes bigger prints and the D7100's AF system brought some improvements, but the D7000's ability to push shadows and its complete lack of colour noise at less than silly ISOs are outstanding.



  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Sun 26-Jan-14 12:56 AM
3262 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#6. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 5


St Petersburg, RU
          

I am of the same mind, the D7000 has some image quality aspects that put it in rare company such as the essentially "ISO'less" performance that complements the D800 very well.
Both are very good cameras and the D7100 has more features but I suspect that if it had a Sony sensor like the D7000 it would be even better. I have no plans or interest in replacing the D7000 since it delivers low ISO file depth better than anything else based on the appearance and measurements.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                
Holmes375 Silver Member Nikonian since 09th Sep 2006Sun 26-Jan-14 04:33 AM
1523 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#7. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

If the D7100 had the 16 MP sensor it could also have had a nicer buffer depth. While I prefer the D7100 to its predecessor its only because of the AF system and a few other control changes, not the newer sensor.

-Holmes
http://holmes.zenfolio.com/

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
goodguy Registered since 01st Sep 2013Mon 27-Jan-14 12:17 PM
45 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#8. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 5
Mon 27-Jan-14 04:09 PM by briantilley

CA
          


I believe I had a bad D7000 and bad 50mm 1.8G.
I know the D7000 is a good camera and I know it can produce pictures almost as good as the D7100 but I had bad luck with mine.
Same about the 50mm 1.8G, I simply got a lemon
I have no problem recommending people getting the 50mm 1.8G, I don't hold my lemon lens responsible to all the 1.8G out there, every company that mass produce product will have a certain percentage of bad examples and I sadly got these examples with the D7000 and 1.8G
I did lose money in the process but I also gained a lot of experience while researching trying to figure out if the problem was with me or the camera/lens so its not all bad news.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Mon 27-Jan-14 04:08 PM
28333 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#9. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 4


Paignton, GB
          

>Yes there was a focusing problem with my D7000, I read this is
>a rather known issue with this camera

It really isn't (a widespread issue)

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
gfinlayson Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Jan 2011Mon 27-Jan-14 09:51 PM
243 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#10. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 9
Mon 27-Jan-14 09:55 PM by gfinlayson

Maidenhead, GB
          

Far too many of the reported focus issues with the D7000 were due to poor technique and/or a lack of understanding of the various AF settings.

The D7000 raised the bar substantially in terms of pixel density and AF options available in a consumer level DSLR.

Higher pixel density images when viewed closely reveal poor technique very clearly, also lens and camera AF calibration become more critical, which is why AF fine tune is included in the D7000.

Too many people practising poor technique tried to AF fine tune their way out of it and got into ever decreasing circles.

The D7000 was branded a dud by many due to internet hysteria.

Most of the issues were distilled down to user error. Some genuine issues were well within the realms of AF fine tune adjustment and a small percentage required service adjustment because the manufacturing tolerances between camera and lens were too far apart and required recalibration.

Camera and lens combinations requiring recalibration can and do happen due to manufacturing tolerances and probably in some cases due to rough handling during shipping.

The need for recalibration has become slightly more common as sensor resolution has gotten higher, but it's still fairly rare.

It's very much in Nikon's best interests to minimise potential issues through good manufacturing practises rather than resolve them later in service centres and I firmly believe that that is what Nikon strives to achieve.

With any high volume manufacturing process, there are always going to be individual units which fall outside of allowable tolerances that still make it out to customers.

Is it preventable? Sure, but economies of scale and the law of diminishing returns come into play here and no one would have bought a D7000 priced at $10,000 would they?

Perfection costs a lot of money and takes an awful lot of effort. Getting it right most of the time and allowing a small number of product failures is much cheaper and easier and allows you to sell goods to your customers at a competitive market price.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                
km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Tue 28-Jan-14 11:31 AM
3262 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#11. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 10


St Petersburg, RU
          

The fact that the camera was replaced without diagnosing the problem which could be an expensive habit to adopt. The odds of getting two devices that have defects that work mostly but impact only sharpness. Could you post some images that failed the sharpness test? Did you narrow the failure to any one consistent trait like back focus, which would have cleared up by stopping down. Or missed focus with even optimum focus targets? The first question is how are you viewing the bad images: screen, prints or pixel peeping?
What was your post processing workflow and how did you sharpen, selective or full image. As you know both a D7000 and D7100 far exceed the displayable detail at normal viewing distance and scaling so monitor viewing will not reveal a difference due to resolution.
Percieved sharpness seldom is based on resolution or lens resolving power but more related to subject, micro and macro contrast and sharpening method.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                    
goodguy Registered since 01st Sep 2013Fri 31-Jan-14 01:01 AM
45 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#12. "RE: D7100 with proper lenses is the tool to create sharp, sharp images"
In response to Reply # 11


CA
          

>The fact that the camera was replaced without diagnosing the
>problem which could be an expensive habit to adopt. The odds
>of getting two devices that have defects that work mostly but
>impact only sharpness. Could you post some images that failed
>the sharpness test? Did you narrow the failure to any one
>consistent trait like back focus, which would have cleared up
>by stopping down. Or missed focus with even optimum focus
>targets? The first question is how are you viewing the bad
>images: screen, prints or pixel peeping?
>What was your post processing workflow and how did you
>sharpen, selective or full image. As you know both a D7000 and
>D7100 far exceed the displayable detail at normal viewing
>distance and scaling so monitor viewing will not reveal a
>difference due to resolution.
>Percieved sharpness seldom is based on resolution or lens
>resolving power but more related to subject, micro and macro
>contrast and sharpening method.
>Stan
>St Petersburg Russia

Visit
>my
>Nikonians gallery>.


I actually didn't open this thread to talk so much about a camera I don't own any more and lens I don't own any more.
The D7000 had a problem, I know that to be certain, I didn't changed and I can tell you the moment I got the D7100 my pictures became my sharper and I am talking about a big improvement.
With the D7000 softness was a problem I faced with all my lenses, some more and some less.
With the 50mm 1.8G pictures were softer then other lenses I had so I knew the problem was with the lens and not the camera because all my other lenses worked like a charm.
The problem was definitely back focusing issues with the D7000

I really don't want to post pictures I have of the D7000, its water under the bridge for me, I moved on, I simply LOVE my D7100.
Its everything I wanted, now when I get soft picture I know its my fault and not the camera, I know what I did wrong and I learn from it and try to improve next time.
Ok I have one beef about the D7100 which is noise in higher ISO but that's because its a DX camera, its good in low light but I do wish it was better.
My next camera will probably be an FX but for now I am just happy

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D7100, D7000 (Public) topic #32267 Previous topic | Next topic


Take the Nikonians Tour and learn more about being a Nikonian Wiki /FAQ /Help Listen to our MP3 photography radio channels Find anything on Nikon and imaging technology - fast!

Copyright © Nikonians 2000, 2014
All Rights Reserved

Nikonians®, NikoScope® and NikoniansAcademy™ are trademarks owned by Nikonians.org.
Nikon®, Nikonos® and Nikkor® are registered trademarks of Nikon Corporation.