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Subject: "Basic Questions" Previous topic | Next topic
msetter Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Dec 2012Tue 08-Oct-13 01:00 AM
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"Basic Questions"


Milford, US
          

I have a couple questions on the D7000 with a 70-300mm zoom and I have been shooting in A mode.

1. If shooting in A mode and I change the ISO will it override just for that shot, or will it stay at the changed value?

2. When shooting in CH mode Every other picture is much darker than the first. Has anyone else experienced that problem with CH mode? When I import into LR it’s light, dark, light, dark all through the series. (example below)

Thanks
Marcy


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Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Basic Questions
kentak Silver Member
08th Oct 2013
1
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kentak Silver Member
08th Oct 2013
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     Reply message RE: Basic Questions
msetter Silver Member
08th Oct 2013
3
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kentak Silver Member
08th Oct 2013
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          Reply message RE: Basic Questions
msetter Silver Member
08th Oct 2013
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kentak Silver Member
09th Oct 2013
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elec164 Silver Member
08th Oct 2013
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msetter Silver Member
08th Oct 2013
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msetter Silver Member
08th Oct 2013
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kentak Silver Member
09th Oct 2013
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Wolphin Silver Member
16th Oct 2013
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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Tue 08-Oct-13 03:39 AM
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#1. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Assuming you do not have Auto-ISO enabled, your ISO will stay at the value you set until you change it. This is true from shot to shot and even if you turn the camera off. The ISO setting is retained.

The light/dark sequence is puzzling. It would be helpful to carefully examine the EXIF data for each shot and see what aspect of exposure (aperture, shutter, ISO) is actually changing from frame to frame. Presumably, if not in auto-ISO, and if in A mode, it would have to be the shutter speed. But, the exposure should not be varying that much. The only thing I can think of offhand, is to check and make sure you do not have bracketing turned on.

Let us know if you discover anything.

Kent

  

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Tue 08-Oct-13 03:59 AM
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#2. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 1


US
          

I just noticed the +/- icon on the second image. That would usually indicate exposure compensation is going on, probably from bracketing.

Push in the BKT button and look at the top LCD. It should show 0F (zero F). If not, hold the BKT button while turning the command dial until it does.

Kent

  

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msetter Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Dec 2012Tue 08-Oct-13 11:20 AM
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#3. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 2


Milford, US
          

Hi Kent,

this series of pictures was this weekend and I did at someones suggestion increase the exposure on the camera. The day was very cloudy and rainy. I will check the other settings and the data on the pictures when I get home tonight. I'll also see if I have any other examples without exposure increased, this was my first time bumping the exposure.

Marcy

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Tue 08-Oct-13 09:37 PM
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#5. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 3


US
          

>Hi Kent,
>
>this series of pictures was this weekend and I did at someones
>suggestion increase the exposure on the camera. The day was
>very cloudy and rainy. I will check the other settings and
>the data on the pictures when I get home tonight. I'll also
>see if I have any other examples without exposure increased,
>this was my first time bumping the exposure.
>
>Marcy
>
>

A few more thoughts, Marcy

Please excuse if the things I say are things you already know. When trying to solve an issue, it's sometimes better to assume less knowledge than more knowledge.

You had mentioned that someone suggested you increase the exposure. Was it because the weather was cloudy and the light poor? Because you asked about ISO settings, I'm wondering if you tried to increase exposure only by increasing ISO. If you were indeed shooting in A (aperture priority) mode, that would not have affected exposure. Because A, like S and P, are automatic exposure modes, they will always try to give a correct exposure unless you force compensation.

If you raise ISO while in A mode, all that will do is force the camera to increase the shutter speed to maintain the same overall exposure value. In other words, raising ISO gives more exposure via more sensitivity, but the camera counters that by increasing shutter speed (less exposure) to bring exposure back to a "correct" value.

Increasing ISO in P, A, S modes helps the camera obtain correct exposure in dim light if--but only if--the camera cannot do so by adjusting aperture or shutter speed, depending on the mode you are in. In A mode, the camera uses the ISO you have set and gives a correct exposure by varying the shutter speed. As light dims, it drops the shutter speed as needed. But, whether shooting at ISO 100 or ISO 400, the resulting exposures should have looked the same.

This is why we have asked for EXIF data. Complete exposure info in the EXIF will pretty much tell us what is going on.

If you needed to increase exposure (brightness) above what the meter says is a "correct" exposure, exposure compensation or bracketing is the only way to do that. Actually, another way is to go to manual mode and meter for more exposure, but we're assuming you were shooting in A mode as stated.

No explanation for the wide variation in exposure in the sequence you posted comes to my mind except bracketing.

I'm not a Lightroom user, so someone else will have to advise on how to extract EXIF data if you need help with that.

Kent

  

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msetter Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Dec 2012Tue 08-Oct-13 10:36 PM
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#6. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 5


Milford, US
          

Kent,

When I increased the exposure I did so with the exposure compensation button.

I'm not an expert so I very much appreciate your detailed responses. In your comment you mention increasing the ISO in A mode will force the camera to increase shutter speed to maintain exposure value. In the next paragraph you mention doing that in P, A and S helps to correct the exposure. Did you mean P, M and S?

I've attached two images exported with full EXIF metadata.

In part it sounds like I'm not using A mode correctly.

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Wed 09-Oct-13 02:47 AM
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#9. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

>Kent,
>
>When I increased the exposure I did so with the exposure
>compensation button.
>
>I'm not an expert so I very much appreciate your detailed
>responses. In your comment you mention increasing the ISO in
>A mode will force the camera to increase shutter speed to
>maintain exposure value. In the next paragraph you mention
>doing that in P, A and S helps to correct the exposure. Did
>you mean P, M and S?
>
>I've attached two images exported with full EXIF metadata.
>
>In part it sounds like I'm not using A mode correctly.

Marcy,

No, I left M out because, as a purely manual mode, the camera will maintain all the exposure settings you set regardless of those being "correct" or not. Instead, the meter in the viewfinder activates and it's up to the user to adjust the settings accordingly to obtain the desired exposure, whether that be dead on, over, or under exposure. The only way to make M mode automatic is to enable auto-ISO, in which case the camera will adjust ISO to keep a correct exposure at the aperture and shutter you have set.

P, S, and A modes are often called semi-automatic modes because they give you more control over settings than the pure automatic (green camera icon) mode. In A mode, you set the aperture and ISO and the camera sets the shutter speed to give a correct exposure. In S mode, you set the shutter and ISO and the camera sets the aperture. In P mode, you set the ISO, and the camera sets a predetermined aperture/shutter value based on the exposure value of the scene.

Suppose you were using S mode in dim light. As you increase the shutter speed to suit your purpose, the camera will open the aperture to maintain the correct exposure. However, at some point the maximum aperture of the lens will be reached and no more adjustment can be made. If the light gets dimmer, or you need to raise the shutter speed, the result will be underexposure. That situation is exactly where raising the ISO would be appropriate to "help" keep a correct exposure. The same result can be had by enabling auto-ISO. Then, the camera will raise the ISO as needed when the aperture bottoms out.

As regarding your use of A mode correctly, I'm not sure how to help with that. It might not have been the best choice for the bird-in-flight sequence since you'd want to, presumably, make sure the bird's motion was frozen. That would require S or M mode. Really, the folks over in the wildlife forum can help you with suggested settings for BIF shots. Dark skies and dim light are always a challenge, and there may not have been any really good solution.

Kent

  

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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Tue 08-Oct-13 01:23 PM
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#4. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 2


US
          

>I just noticed the +/- icon on the second image. That would
>usually indicate exposure compensation is going on, probably
>from bracketing.
>

The example image looks like a screen grab of the LR film strip. If so that +/- indicates that the image has edit steps applied.

Although my first thoughts are that it's due to EB (Exposure Bracketing).

Question, when shooting with CH did you notice that the camera would only shoot a certain number of frames then stop? Then you would need to release shutter to shoot again. If EB is active when shooting in CH mode, then the number of exposure set in EB will be fired of in succession then the camera will stop till you release the shutter button. Then when pressed again another EB burst will occur.

As Kent suggested, two sample images (one light one dark)with EXIF data intact will help us better understand what might be going on.

Pete

Pete

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msetter Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Dec 2012Tue 08-Oct-13 10:43 PM
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#7. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 4


Milford, US
          

Pete, I believe your onto something, the explanation of the CH is exactly what happens to me when shooting and it's been annoying me that it stops shooting at the wrong times.

I'm not sure where that setting is or how it might have been changed.

Marcy

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msetter Silver Member Nikonian since 11th Dec 2012Tue 08-Oct-13 11:43 PM
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#8. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 7


Milford, US
          

I have read the EB setting options and I'm not sure which to choose. I rarely use a flash, I almost exclusively shoot outdoors during the day what would be my best bet for a setting?

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Wed 09-Oct-13 02:54 AM
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#10. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 7
Wed 09-Oct-13 02:56 AM by kentak

US
          

>Pete, I believe your onto something, the explanation of the
>CH is exactly what happens to me when shooting and it's been
>annoying me that it stops shooting at the wrong times.
>
>I'm not sure where that setting is or how it might have been
>changed.
>
>Marcy

That really, really seems to indicate you had bracketing enabled. That explains, then, why you got the light/dark/light/dark exposures.

See my post #2 regarding turning EB off. When you hold the BKT button in and look at the top LCD screen, you'll see two values. The one on the left is the number of exposures in the bracket sequence--either 2F, 3F, or zero F. The value on the right is the amount of exposure variance in the bracket. That can be ignored for now.

Hold the BKT button in and turn the rear command dial left or right until the left value shows 0F (zero F). That turns bracketing off.

Kent

  

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Wolphin Silver Member Nikonian since 04th Mar 2012Wed 16-Oct-13 04:03 PM
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#11. "RE: Basic Questions"
In response to Reply # 0


Calgary, CA
          

To learn the camera, I am going to recommend you read the manual, or get the Mastering the Nikon D7000 -- The mastering goes into more detail and gives a bit more explanation about what it actually does!

This site is great resource, but we can deal with one question at a time. I got that book for my D7000 and feel it is well worth the money!

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