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Subject: "In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000" Previous topic | Next topic
ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Wed 17-Jul-13 11:01 PM
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"In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"


US
          

Hello,

I've been reading through these forums in hope of gaining some enlightenment on how to proceed with embarking into the realm of DSLR photography. Many years ago, I spent a fair amount of time on photography, but I have not been able to do so in recent years.

The only SLR camera I have ever owned is a Nikon F3, which I still have, but which I prefer not to use due to the inconvenience of using film. I own a point and shoot digital camera, but I've recently decided to return to photography as a hobby, and this camera is insufficient for that purpose.

As a Nikon user, who has some old lenses (which hopefully I can still use), I thought I would stay with Nikon as I moved into digital photography. My biggest problem with getting into digital photography is that I am on a limited budget. This will affect what equipment I am able to buy now and for the foreseeable future.

Initially, I considered buying an inexpensive DSLR just to get started, but I realized that I would outgrow such a camera too quickly, making it a bad and frustrating investment. So, after a considerable amount of reading, I have begun to think that I would do well to buy a D7000 with an all-purpose lens to be used for learning.

I am aware that there are advantages to going with a D7100 or even a D600 (for those with a larger budget), but I keep coming back to the D7000 as a better value for someone just starting out.

I would like to get some feedback and advice from more experienced photographers on my plan. Right now, Amazon has a bundle which seems like a good starting point for me, at an acceptable price. It consists of a Nikon D7000 DX-Format CMOS Digital SLR Kit with 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S DX VR II ED Nikkor Lens; included is a 16GB SD card and two Nikon instructional DVDs (a huge selling point if you don't know what you're doing!).

I have also considered the kit with the 18-105mm lens, but it does not appear to be as good of a deal (money-wise) as the 18-200mm kit. From what I've read, people either love or hate the 18-200mm lens. This lens seems slow and not particularly useful at either end, but it might be good for practicing, as well as for vacationing or hiking excursions.

I can't afford to buy the D600 or the lenses which it uses, so I have ruled it out. I have considered the D7100, but don't see it as enough of an improvement to warrant the extra expenditure over the D7000. Perhaps I would be better off saving some money up-front by buying the D7000 18-200mm kit and investing in better lenses when my budget allows.

Also, I have several old lenses lying around. The one I would like to use most is the Nikkor 50mm 1.4 lens, which came with my F3. I imagine it would be sharper than the 18-200mm, although I'm not sure how old lenses compare to new ones. Will this lens work with the D7000? If so, will I run into any limitations when using it?

Any opinions on my reasoning and options would be greatly appreciated.

  

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Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000
Leonard62 Gold Member
18th Jul 2013
1
Reply message RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000
ubiety
18th Jul 2013
2
     Reply message RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000
Leonard62 Gold Member
18th Jul 2013
3
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KnightPhoto Gold Member
18th Jul 2013
4
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ubiety
18th Jul 2013
5
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Alfred70
19th Jul 2013
6
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ubiety
20th Jul 2013
7
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luckyphoto Silver Member
20th Jul 2013
9
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ubiety
20th Jul 2013
10
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Mycenius Silver Member
21st Jul 2013
11
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ubiety
22nd Jul 2013
15
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Chris Platt Silver Member
28th Jul 2013
28
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s2sailorlis_nikon
22nd Jul 2013
16
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ubiety
24th Jul 2013
18
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KurtP Gold Member
26th Jul 2013
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mjhach Silver Member
09th Aug 2013
31
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professorune
20th Jul 2013
8
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singlerosa Silver Member
21st Jul 2013
12
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tfeazel Silver Member
21st Jul 2013
13
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Omaha
21st Jul 2013
14
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billD80 Silver Member
23rd Jul 2013
17
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ubiety
24th Jul 2013
19
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billD80 Silver Member
24th Jul 2013
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Bravozulu Silver Member
24th Jul 2013
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ubiety
25th Jul 2013
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Bravozulu Silver Member
27th Jul 2013
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ubiety
28th Jul 2013
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Bravozulu Silver Member
28th Jul 2013
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ubiety
28th Jul 2013
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07th Aug 2013
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Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009Thu 18-Jul-13 12:20 AM
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#1. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 0
Thu 18-Jul-13 12:27 AM by Leonard62

Hatboro, Pa, US
          

The D7000 with the AFS 18-200mm lens is an excellent kit. I have had my 18-200mm lens a long time and find it's a very capable lens. I find it's very sharp all the way to 200mm. Others here will tell you it starts getting a little soft toward the long end but I don't find that to be the case with mine.

You can use most of the manual focus Nikon lenses made after 1978 or so that have the AI indexing feature. Do you know if your old lenses are AI? Lenses that are not AI will need to be converted to operate on the D7000 otherwise you can damage the camera. One of the ways to tell is if the meter prongs have little triangular cutouts on each of the prongs. The non-AI prongs are solid without cutouts. To use these manual lens all you need to do is add the lens focal length and aperture into the non-CPU lens data in the Setup Menu. That will give you accurate metering and the accurate aperture readout in the upper control panel.

Your old 50mm f1.4 lens is quite capable and might be a little sharper than the 18-200mm but even though I have both lenses I've never compared them.

Len

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Thu 18-Jul-13 01:00 AM
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#2. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 1


US
          

>One of the ways to tell is if the meter prongs
>have little triangular cutouts on each of the prongs. The
>non-AI prongs are solid without cutouts. To use these manual
>lens all you need to do is add the lens focal length and
>aperture into the non-CPU lens data in the Setup Menu. That
>will give you accurate metering and the accurate aperture
>readout in the upper control panel.

Thanks for your reply. I just checked the 50mm lens and it does have cutouts on the prongs, so it looks as if I will be able to use it with the D7000. I also have a couple of non-Nikon lenses which I used with the F3, but I am less certain about their compatibility. A little more research may be in order to figure out whether these lenses would be usable with the D7000.

I'm leaning heavily towards the D7000 with AFS 18-200mm lens kit, and I'm encouraged by hearing that I can use my old AI lenses in addition to the kit lens. Unless I'm missing something, this set-up should give me plenty of room to grow before I need to invest in more equipment.

  

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Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009Thu 18-Jul-13 01:56 AM
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#3. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 2


Hatboro, Pa, US
          


>
>Thanks for your reply. I just checked the 50mm lens and it
>does have cutouts on the prongs, so it looks as if I will be
>able to use it with the D7000. I also have a couple of
>non-Nikon lenses which I used with the F3, but I am less
>certain about their compatibility. A little more research may
>be in order to figure out whether these lenses would be usable
>with the D7000.
>

Since you still have the F3 you can tell if your lenses are AI compatible or not. The F3 can use both AI and non-AI lenses by putting the AI meter coupling lever located at the 1 o'clock position around the camera lens mount up or down. If your lenses contact and move the lever when it's in the down position the lens is AI. If the lens mount interferes with the lever so it has to be moved out of the way by pushing the little button next to the lever, it is non-AI and should not be used on the D7000.

Len

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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KnightPhoto Gold Member Nikonian since 18th Dec 2006Thu 18-Jul-13 03:05 AM
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#4. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 3


Alberta, CA
          

Wow Len, what great tips about AI vs. Non, hadn't heard about those particular methods before.

For the OP, I can indicate the D7000 sensor is a great way to get started. Very nice performer and the first of a new generation of high dynamic range cameras with strong ability to boost the shadows.

I also always liked my 18-200 as well. Once sharpened in post, I don't recall being disappointed in it's images.

Best regards, SteveK

'A camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.' -- Dorothea Lange
My Nikonians gallery
My Nikonians Blog

  

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Thu 18-Jul-13 03:44 AM
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#5. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 3


US
          

>Since you still have the F3 you can tell if your lenses are AI
>compatible or not. The F3 can use both AI and non-AI lenses by
>putting the AI meter coupling lever located at the 1 o'clock
>position around the camera lens mount up or down. If your
>lenses contact and move the lever when it's in the down
>position the lens is AI. If the lens mount interferes with
>the lever so it has to be moved out of the way by pushing the
>little button next to the lever, it is non-AI and should not
>be used on the D7000.

Well, it looks like I'm in luck! All of the old lenses are AI. I had forgotten about the meter coupling lever, which, if memory serves me correctly, an astute salesman once pointed out to me when I was shopping for lenses.

I'm less certain of the quality of the non-Nikon lenses, but they should be good to experiment with anyway. Thanks for your advice; it's been very helpful.

  

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Alfred70 Registered since 12th Dec 2012Fri 19-Jul-13 10:33 PM
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#6. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 5


San Antonio, US
          

I purchased the D7000 with the 18-200mm lens used, a few months ago, and I'm very happy with it.There is a pretty steep learning curve (at least it was for me) with the camera, but certainly not impossible. The warning that the 18-200 is soft at maximum zoom is probably true, but the caution to stay away from the limits of the lens pretty well applies to all zoom lenses. I liked the 18-200mm lens well enough to buy a second one for my wife's D40x. It works great on that camera also.

I say make the purchase and enjoy your camera along with all the extra lenses you have.

Alfred
San Antonio, TX

  

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Sat 20-Jul-13 03:34 AM
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#7. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

>I purchased the D7000 with the 18-200mm lens used, a few
>months ago, and I'm very happy with it.There is a pretty steep
>learning curve (at least it was for me) with the camera, but
>certainly not impossible. The warning that the 18-200 is soft
>at maximum zoom is probably true, but the caution to stay away
>from the limits of the lens pretty well applies to all zoom
>lenses.

Thanks for providing your experience with the same D7000 kit. With respect to learning curves, just shopping for one of these cameras requires a steep learning curve. And now, I'm preparing myself for a bit of a shock when initially using the camera -- although I'm sure I'll catch on eventually.

As someone who is tech savvy, mastering the technical side of the camera shouldn't be too much of a problem. Learning how to use it to produce the images I have in mind will probably be much more challenging. On the bright side, it will keep me busy.

By the way, I have just placed an order for the above-mentioned D7000 kit. I've received more positive feedback than negative for my equipment purchasing plan, so I've decided to take the plunge, and won't look back.

  

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luckyphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Sat 20-Jul-13 11:09 AM
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#9. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 7


Port Charlotte, US
          

Regarding the learning curve - the D7000 Nikon manual is a bit less that adequate with regard to explaining how to use the camera. I would highly suggest investing in a 3rd party D7000 book that can be used as a reference.

There are several good ones. I bought the Thom Hogan book.

http://www.bythom.com/nikond7000guide.htm

Another great choice is Darrell Young's D7000 book.

http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Nikon-D7000-Darrell-Young/dp/1933952806

You'll be amazed at how these books can help get you up to speed quickly.

Congratulation on your new D7000 and getting into the digital world of photography.

Larry

"Red is gray and yellow white, but we decide which is right
....and which is an illusion"

Moody Blues - Nights in White Satin

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Sat 20-Jul-13 01:04 PM
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#10. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 9


US
          

>Regarding the learning curve - the D7000 Nikon manual is a
>bit less that adequate with regard to explaining how to use
>the camera. I would highly suggest investing in a 3rd party
>D7000 book that can be used as a reference.

This is a good idea. I'll pick up one of these books to get started. Anything that can get me up to speed more quickly will be a plus. I'd hate to have to struggle with my camera instead of spending my time actually photographing things.

  

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Mycenius Silver Member Nikonian since 25th Feb 2006Sun 21-Jul-13 08:56 AM
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#11. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 10


Auckland, NZ
          

>This is a good idea. I'll pick up one of these books to get
>started.

I'd strongly recommend Darrell Young's as a start. Thom Hogan's book's are awesome (I bought the D70, D80, and D90 ones) but they are super detailed, and IMO of more use once you are becoming an advanced user of your model camera. Darrell's books are an easier read and get you from 0 to 50 quickly and have enough advanced info for reasonably long-term usefulness....

Just my 2c...

John
Kiwi Nikonian
D7100 | Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 | Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8G | Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G | Tamron 70-300mm f/4.0-5.6 | Samyang 35mm f/1.4 | Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D | Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G Micro

  

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Mon 22-Jul-13 12:49 AM
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#15. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 11


US
          

>Darrell's books are an easier read and get you from 0 to 50
>quickly and have enough advanced info for reasonably long-term
>usefulness....

I visited a local bookstore today to look for photography books. They had a copy of Darrell Young's D7000 book. It looked pretty straight-forward and seemed to have a lot of information about the camera. As you've pointed out, a super detailed book like Thom Hogan's may be more useful to me once I've mastered the camera's basic functions. I think I'll start with Young's book and add Hogan's to my short list for future reading.

  

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Chris Platt Silver Member Nikonian since 30th Sep 2012Sun 28-Jul-13 05:01 PM
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#28. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 15


Newburg, US
          

Let me add the Thom Hogan's book also comes with an extra, bound, short primer "Nikon D7000 To Go Guide." It's a short, no-nonsense, how do you make the camera work guide. 148 Pages.

I don't want to discount the manual that comes with the camera either. Although it could be clearer in some instances, I have seen many, many questions on this forum that are easily answered by referring to the manual that came with the camera. The nice thing about the manual is that in can be downloaded in PDF version. I have a copy on my smart phone, so I am never without a reference for the camera.

Visit my gallery.

  

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s2sailorlis_nikon Registered since 19th Jun 2012Mon 22-Jul-13 01:42 AM
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#16. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 10


US
          

As you get the urge to buy additional lenses, note that there is a large market of used Nikkor lenses that are much cheaper than buying new. KEH s a great source, as is eBay if you purchase from a good buyer (1080 Photography has good selections but you have to CAREFULLY read his description before buying...and bid low..)

Enjoy your D7K, i am likey going to get a 7100 in the future, or perhaps a used D700.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.



excuse typos...via iPad....

  

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Wed 24-Jul-13 12:05 AM
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#18. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 16


US
          

>As you get the urge to buy additional lenses, note that there
>is a large market of used Nikkor lenses that are much cheaper
>than buying new. KEH s a great source, as is eBay if you
>purchase from a good buyer (1080 Photography has good
>selections but you have to CAREFULLY read his description
>before buying...and bid low..)

I've just finished checking out KEH's website. They seem to have a decent selection of used Nikkor lenses, some of which are very competitively priced. I've never been a big eBay fan, but I'll certainly check out their listings when I'm in the market for more lenses. In any event, I'll keep my eyes open for good used lens deals, as this will undoubtedly help me to stretch my budget.

  

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KurtP Gold Member Nikonian since 01st Jan 2013Fri 26-Jul-13 01:13 AM
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#23. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 7


Quesnel, CA
          

I bought the D7000 last Christmas and have been very happy with it although like you say their is that learning curve. I bought the book mastering the d7000 by Darrell Young and must say it is a joy to read although my 66 year old brain can only absorb so much which, is of course, lengthening my learning curve. I am looking forward to my retirement in Feb when I can devote more time to my rediscovered hobby. I have the 18-200 and like it just fine.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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mjhach Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Dec 2010Fri 09-Aug-13 04:17 PM
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#31. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 5


Simcoe, CA
          

I echo response #4. I have D7000 & 18-200mm VR1 and can't see what the problems are. It's a great lens with lot's of utility given its wide fl range.

Mike

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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professorune Registered since 08th Jun 2013Sat 20-Jul-13 03:50 AM
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#8. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


HK
          

The 18-200mm lens is an allround lens. It will save you from carrying a bulk of lenses everywhere you go for an equivalent range.
Combined with the D7000 you'll probably have enough to keep you happy for a while.

  

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singlerosa Silver Member Charter MemberSun 21-Jul-13 12:42 PM
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#12. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 8


St. Louis, US
          

I used the 18-200 VRII with my D7K for 2 years until I got a D600 and sold it to buy better glass for the FX body. I liked it a lot and used it often when I didn't want to lug a bag full of lenses around. It's a great combo. Good luck and happy shooting.

Jim Singler D600/D7K with a bunch of lenses and other assorted stuff

  

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tfeazel Silver Member Nikonian since 12th Sep 2004Sun 21-Jul-13 03:04 PM
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#13. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


Polk City, US
          

My GF now has my D7000 since I got a D600. I still use it from time to time, and am always impressed with its performance. From a controls standpoint, it's almost exactly the same as a D600. Handy for me. It's a great camera and the 18-200 is an excellent lens.

It's one of my 14 Nikon lenses, all of which work great on the D7000. This includes 2 converted non-AI lenses.

The 18-200 and a Tokina 12-24 (which I recommend) are my only DX lenses. These two lenses and the D7000 make a great travel kit.

The D7100 probably is not worth the extra money for you. I determined that it isn't worth it for me.

Good luck with your selection.

Tom

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Sun 21-Jul-13 10:08 PM
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#14. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


Omaha, US
          

D7000/18-200 is a great setup. Short of some very specialized situations, its all you'll ever need.

You are so right about the learning curve stuff. There is a whole world to this stuff, it can be hard to know where to start.

Best of luck to you!

Visit my Nikonians gallery
Most of my Nikon photos end up here.

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Tue 23-Jul-13 12:32 PM
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#17. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

>Hello,
>
>I've been reading through these forums in hope of gaining some
>enlightenment on how to proceed with embarking into the realm
>of DSLR photography. Many years ago, I spent a fair amount of
>time on photography, but I have not been able to do so in
>recent years.
>
>The only SLR camera I have ever owned is a Nikon F3, which I
>still have, but which I prefer not to use due to the
>inconvenience of using film.

The D7000 is a fine camera, and while it's much lighter than the D3, it's very well screwed together. Its shutter is MUCH quieter than the D3.

If you can shoot a D3, I think you'll find the D7000 a piece of cake. I think the main thing will be to understand how to use the AF so the mode you're using is consistent with what you're trying to shoot.

For most landscapes and portraits, I use AF-S mode, use the shutter release button to set my center-point sensor focus on the subject I want tack sharp, hold the shutter release (which holds the focus), recompose and fire away. Sounds complicated, but it soon becomes second nature.

The D7000 has a very light shutter release button, but it becomes second nature... In the settings, I'd use STANDARD for color rendition, and set the SHARPENING to '6' (Nikon sets that VERY conservatively).

I'd have two SD Cards installed, shoot NEF's (RAW) if you like to do post processing, or the Highest size/quality JPEGs.

I'd also use View NX2 (comes free with the camera, or can be downloaded), as it will convert your NEF files to JPEG's, and is a fairly easy editing tool.

I use View NX2 as my image browser, and I use a Western Digital pair of small external Passport drives to hold my images. They're stored on one, and then I use SyncToy to back-up onto the second drive every so often.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Wed 24-Jul-13 03:17 AM
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#19. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 17
Wed 24-Jul-13 02:09 PM by ubiety

US
          

>For most landscapes and portraits, I use AF-S mode, use the
>shutter release button to set my center-point sensor focus on
>the subject I want tack sharp, hold the shutter release (which
>holds the focus), recompose and fire away. Sounds
>complicated, but it soon becomes second nature.
>
>The D7000 has a very light shutter release button, but it
>becomes second nature... In the settings, I'd use STANDARD
>for color rendition, and set the SHARPENING to '6' (Nikon sets
>that VERY conservatively).
>
>I'd have two SD Cards installed, shoot NEF's (RAW) if you like
>to do post processing, or the Highest size/quality JPEGs.
>
>I'd also use View NX2 (comes free with the camera, or can be
>downloaded), as it will convert your NEF files to JPEG's, and
>is a fairly easy editing tool.
>
>I use View NX2 as my image browser, and I use a Western
>Digital pair of small external Passport drives to hold my
>images. They're stored on one, and then I use SyncToy to
>back-up onto the second drive every so often.

Thanks for the advice. Some things that I take for granted from my film days, like focusing, will take some practice with my new camera. But, as you say, once I've done it enough times, it will become second nature and I'll be able to concentrate more on capturing good shots than operating the camera.

As for post processing, I'm still unsure of how I'll handle that piece of it. Currently, I do little, if any, image processing. I have GIMP installed on my computer, and may use it until I get a better feel for my post processing needs. GIMP handles RAW processing through a plugin, which may or may not produce acceptable results. Maybe using View NX2 to convert the NEF files to JPEGs would be easier.

There is a lot of conflicting advice online about which software works best for processing RAW image files. Working with these programs may be the only way to understand what people are talking about when they either praise or criticize photo editing software. I guess I'll find out soon enough... if everything goes as expected, my new camera will be here tomorrow and I'll be able to start experimenting with the various facets of digital photography.

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Wed 24-Jul-13 12:11 PM
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#20. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 19


US
          

Maybe using View NX2 to
>convert the NEF files to JPEGs would be easier.
>
>There is a lot of conflicting advice online about which
>software works best for processing RAW image files.

Only View NX2 and Capture NX2 can unpack all the data in Nikon RAW files. Other companies have to reverse engineer, and they cannot access some aspects of the NEF's.

Does this matter? Not for many who happily use PS and LR and others. I am not a big post-processing guy either, so I like the View NX2 for conversion, and also use Capture NX2 if I am going to do actual post-processing.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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Bravozulu Silver Member Nikonian since 04th Jun 2012Wed 24-Jul-13 07:38 PM
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#21. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 20
Wed 24-Jul-13 07:40 PM by Bravozulu

Los Angeles, US
          

I own a D7000 for a little more than one year. My background in photography is similar to yours. Nikon 35mm since 1968. Worked in Tokyo. Owned 6 Nikkor lenses. I was paid as a photojournalist.

I'm going to ignore all the responses to your question. I don't know current prices and have no opinions about lenses because I think that is something which should be tailored to your shooting. I myself have 4 Nikkor AF lenses. But which ones will remain a secret because you are you. Think closely about the distances and the environment you will shoot. Will primes work, or do you need zoom? Do you need fast lenses or are kit lenses good enough? There can be big price tags attached to any of these choices.

But here is what I want to say to you about your entry into digital photography. My friend, a 747 captain at Continental airlines suggested the D7000 to me. He said, "When you get it, forget the fact that it is digital and highly automated. Instead, set the camera to M (for Manul) and pretend it is a film camera. Doing so will focus your education on the camera buttons and controls.

I ignored his advice, got a book and was paralyzed reading and "surfing" through menus on the D7000 instead of shooting. 60 days passed, I had taken less than 100 images, and I was really, really confused. You have simply got to learn the camera (not menus, mind you) before you feel comfortable with it. Menu options are secondary in most instances. Who cares if the date and time are adjusted in the Setup Menu? All those details can wait. You need to start shooting, which will give you the hand-eye coordination needed for mastery.

I will go one step further. I have 3 books on the D7000. The last one I bought is my clear favorite. It is short and to the point. Published in England --- Nikon D7000, by Jon Sparks, Ammonite Press. Buy the book before getting the camera and you'll have a preview of what you're in for. And remember this important fact about any camera — If you miss the shot, what good is a zillion megapixel capacity and a $1million dollar lens? The D7000 offers capacity beyond my meager photo skills.

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Thu 25-Jul-13 09:41 PM
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#22. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 21


US
          

>But here is what I want to say to you about your entry into
>digital photography. My friend, a 747 captain at Continental
>airlines suggested the D7000 to me. He said, "When you
>get it, forget the fact that it is digital and highly
>automated. Instead, set the camera to M (for Manul) and
>pretend it is a film camera. Doing so will focus your
>education on the camera buttons and controls.

Your suggestion certainly is an interesting way to approach working with a new DSLR camera. Using the camera, rather than trying to learn all the features, would be less overwhelming and would allow me to emphasize photography over technology.

The number of features these cameras have is staggering. This alone would be enough to paralyze a novice DSLR photographer.

To avoid getting bogged down, I may try a hybrid approach comprised of shooting with the camera set to M and then gradually working my way through the menus and features. There's no rush, especially since it's hard to believe that I will ever use or need all of the things the D7000 offers. But, maybe I will change my mind once I start using it. Sometimes we don't think we need things until we have them and then we can't imagine how we ever lived without them.








  

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Bravozulu Silver Member Nikonian since 04th Jun 2012Sat 27-Jul-13 04:30 AM
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#24. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 22


Los Angeles, US
          

You will face a two-tiered challenge in acquiring the D7000. a) where are the buttons I need to push. b)how can I tailor the camera to my preferences.

Challenge A can only be learned by your fingers. And this takes time, so you aren't fumbling.
"B", setting preferences, such as for contrast/hue/intensity actually takes more time, but is secondary to using the camera. You have simply got to start firing off shots to learn.

A close Nikon friend owns the D800 and says the menus are far more deep than on mine. But, they are subtleties for the most part. You can take a perfectly good picture without going through deeper and deeper menus to adjust these things.

When I bought my camera, I went to visit a close friend who is a still photographer for the movie studios in Hollywood. In his back yard he began to give lessons. He continually warned me to look through the viewfinder and at my subject. I tended to fixate on menus appearing on the LCD back screen. To repeat, how good is any camera if you miss your shot.

When you tackle something like a wedding, operating the camera has got to be instinct. Or, you'll miss the shot.

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Sun 28-Jul-13 07:50 AM
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#25. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 24


US
          

>You will face a two-tiered challenge in acquiring the D7000.
>a) where are the buttons I need to push. b)how can I tailor
>the camera to my preferences.
>
>Challenge A can only be learned by your fingers. And this
>takes time, so you aren't fumbling.
>"B", setting preferences, such as for
>contrast/hue/intensity actually takes more time, but is
>secondary to using the camera. You have simply got to start
>firing off shots to learn.

>When you tackle something like a wedding, operating the camera
>has got to be instinct. Or, you'll miss the shot.



So far, I haven't fallen into the trap you found yourself in. My camera arrived and I sat down for a few hours to read through the D7000 books I bought, with the camera in front of me.

I adjusted a few settings and then went outside to take some practice shots. I decided to shoot JPEGs since the camera was already set to this and I have never worked with RAW images. Unfortunately, I did not realize that the compression rate was set to "normal" when I would have preferred "fine." I've already changed it, so next time I'll get to see the best quality JPEGs this camera can produce.

You wouldn't believe how long it took me to shoot 40 shots. I started out in manual and then I tried the auto, aperture priority and shutter priority modes. I tried to use all of the buttons on the camera body to familiarize myself with them and to make sure they worked.

Out of 40 shots, 37 were usable. With respect to the other 3, I may have gotten trigger happy and accidentally pressed the shutter release button all the way down before I had properly composed the shot.

Once I got home, I reviewed the images carefully. Based on my observations, I changed some of the camera's settings and came up with a new shooting strategy for my next effort. On day two, I will shoot RAW on one card and Fine JPEGs on the other. This will give me a chance to work with NEF images in ViewNX 2.

The only real problem I had was getting ViewNX 2 to recognize the D7000. The camera is installed and working properly on a Windows 7 machine, but when I turn on the camera after plugging it into the USB port, ViewNX 2 doesn't find it. I set the camera to do transfers with ViewNX 2, and I enabled autorun for all devices, but all this did was launch the ViewNX 2 Transfer interface, which remains empty.

If anyone knows why ViewNX 2 won't transfer images from my camera and how to fix it, I'd appreciate some help. Other than that, I'll be experimenting with my new camera, and hopefully, it won't take me too long to get up to speed.




  

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Bravozulu Silver Member Nikonian since 04th Jun 2012Sun 28-Jul-13 08:00 AM
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#26. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 25


Los Angeles, US
          

Great results. Here's a tip from Thom Hogan'a book on the D7000. Instead of plugging a cord into the USB port on the left, it is much faster and uses no battery power (a significant issue) if you just purchase a $20 SD Card reader from your local camera store.

Amazon.com and BH Photo have them, but then you'll have to wait for delivery.

I find myself the most common use I have for Jpegs is as attached files to emails. So, in those cases SMALL/BASIC minimizes the file stuff. Like you, I set the SHOOTING MENU to save images in RAW and Jpeg. It will take you some time to understand the ins-and-outs of RAW and what advantages it offers.

Have fun. That's the important point. There are no DSLR police!

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ubiety Registered since 17th Jul 2013Sun 28-Jul-13 09:24 AM
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#27. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 26


US
          

>Great results. Here's a tip from Thom Hogan'a book on the
>D7000. Instead of plugging a cord into the USB port on the
>left, it is much faster and uses no battery power (a
>significant issue) if you just purchase a $20 SD Card reader
>from your local camera store.
>

Thanks, I had forgotten about battery use while transferring files with the USB cable. A card reader sounds like a better idea.

I don't know much about RAW images at this point. But, if I shoot with two cards, having the JPEGs available for immediate use will give me time to figure out what RAW is all about.

By the way, I'm already having fun with this camera, and I agree that having fun is what photography is all about. If it's not fun, then it's not really worth doing.

  

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Bravozulu Silver Member Nikonian since 04th Jun 2012Sun 28-Jul-13 05:56 PM
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#29. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 27


Los Angeles, US
          

About RAW. I have one year experience with digital. I have one month experience with PP, digital software. It is a whole other realm. If compared to film days (I had 30 years as a photo journalist) it puts YOU in the position of choosing kodachrome 64 or color negative film, then gives you the control of a Kodak labs chemist, and lastly as a darkroom technician.

It gives you power. But, boy, is there a lot to learn. I dithered for months before settling on the particular software I got. And RAW enables you to manipulate all the variables. Jpeg is far more automatic, and simplified and limited. RAW can turn night into day, literally. I think. But, as I saw, what do I know. I'm new to post processing.

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Henry64 Silver Member Nikonian since 13th Jan 2008Wed 07-Aug-13 05:26 AM
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#30. "RE: In Need of Information and Advice On Buying a D7000"
In response to Reply # 29


DK
          

Hi

Dont know if anyone mentioned this above - a D7000 and D7100 are bóth crop cameras so you 50mm Will give you a 75mm FOV, and you will not get 18 mm either, however you will gain some "extra" in the long end d600 will be like your F3. Maybe think about a second hand or refurb. D600 if you like narrow DOF like with the F3 and to shoot wide angle

I own 2 D800 and I'm very very happy with them, however I might buy a D7100 or D400 once it comes for shooting wildlife.

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