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Subject: "Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW meterin..." Previous topic | Next topic
Devrishi Silver Member Nikonian since 23rd Apr 2013Fri 31-May-13 06:57 AM
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"Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."


Kanpur, IN
          

Hello,

I want to take a landscape shot having infinite depth of field with Spot/centre weighted metering... Please guide..

Say, i have a landscape in front of me with bright lit blue sky (sunny day) with clouds on top, hills with shadows on right side of my frame & on left some river - and ground with trees below.

I want complete depth of field with the right exposure in one single shot. I assign (f4) AE-L/AF-L button to AE Lock only. I am in Auto mode. I switch over to Spot Metering & focus on some brightlit-grass say some 20' away and lock my exposure by pressing AE-L/AF-L button. In this way my exposure gets locked. I keep holding the AE-L/AF-L button and for complete depth of field say my hyperfocul distance is 3' - i auto-focus on ground at 3' and swith over to Manual on lens - frame my shot (holding the AE Lock button) and shoot.

Similarly, in Centre weighted (8mm default) metering, can the same procedure be repeated? I lock the exposure on grass - holding the AE-L/Af-L button, auto-focus 3' away - switch to manual on lens - reframe my shot & shoot.

Is the procedure okay?

I understand, if i do not get a good 'complete' shot - after adjusting +/- ev values - then HDR is the answer.

Please guide...

Thanks & regards

Devrishi

Sandeep Prakash Srivastava

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
kodiak photo Silver Member
31st May 2013
1
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
Devrishi Silver Member
31st May 2013
3
     Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
kodiak photo Silver Member
31st May 2013
4
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
Omaha
31st May 2013
2
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
Devrishi Silver Member
31st May 2013
5
     Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
kodiak photo Silver Member
31st May 2013
6
          Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
Omaha
31st May 2013
7
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
RRowlett Silver Member
31st May 2013
8
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
JosephK Silver Member
31st May 2013
9
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
Toby01 Silver Member
01st Jun 2013
10
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
dagoldst Silver Member
01st Jun 2013
11
Reply message RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW met...
Devrishi Silver Member
01st Jun 2013
12

kodiak photo Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Feb 2013Fri 31-May-13 09:35 AM
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#1. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 31-May-13 09:40 AM by kodiak photo

Montrιal, (Qc), CA
          

*
Hello Devrishi,

Let's try this initial setup for handheld photography:

Lens • AF + zoom at 16mm
Mode • A
ISO • 800
Meter • Matrix
WB • Daylight
Aperture • ƒ22
Time •
If you read slower than 1/125s, raise to ISO 1600 or more.
If you read faster than 1/125s, lower to ISO to 400 or less.

Focus at +/- 10' press AF-L, frame your picture and shoot.

Try this and tell me how is you picture.

Have a good time!

Kodiak
Groovy Shootings
Image Mιdia
www.kodiakmedia.at
Photography • Design • Typography

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Devrishi Silver Member Nikonian since 23rd Apr 2013Fri 31-May-13 04:13 PM
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#3. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 1


Kanpur, IN
          

Thanks for your reply Kodiak... it has rained heavily here & its very cloudy... pls give me sometime... let the sun be out & shining & I'll take the pic as u say & post here..

Best regards..

Devrishi

Sandeep Prakash Srivastava

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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kodiak photo Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Feb 2013Fri 31-May-13 04:16 PM
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#4. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 3


Montrιal, (Qc), CA
          


*

No problem, there is always help anytime here,

Have a good day…

Kodiak
Groovy Shootings
Image Mιdia
www.kodiakmedia.at
Photography • Design • Typography

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
In photography, light is free but catching it is not!
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  

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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Fri 31-May-13 09:46 AM
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#2. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 0


Omaha, US
          

> I want complete depth of field with the right exposure in one single shot.

Reading all that, it sure seems like this would be a lot simpler if you just manually metered your scene (ie "Zone System") and manually focused the lens.

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Most of my Nikon photos end up here.

  

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Devrishi Silver Member Nikonian since 23rd Apr 2013Fri 31-May-13 04:19 PM
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#5. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 2


Kanpur, IN
          

>> I want complete depth of field with the right exposure
>in one single shot.
>
>Reading all that, it sure seems like this would be a lot
>simpler if you just manually metered your scene (ie "Zone
>System") and manually focused the lens.

Thanks for your reply Omaha... I am still learning photography.. pls let me know what do u mean by 'manually meter your scene & zone system'. Do u mean external hand held exposure meter? Please explain.

Best regards..

Devrishi



Sandeep Prakash Srivastava

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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kodiak photo Silver Member Nikonian since 28th Feb 2013Fri 31-May-13 04:24 PM
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#6. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 5


Montrιal, (Qc), CA
          


*
Do not worry about this now!

Jeff was giving tips that belong to ADVANCED photographers!
You will appreciate and love Jeff's tips when you will get there…

Have a good day…

Kodiak
Groovy Shootings
Image Mιdia
www.kodiakmedia.at
Photography • Design • Typography

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
In photography, light is free but catching it is not!
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  

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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Fri 31-May-13 05:24 PM
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#7. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 6


Omaha, US
          

>
>*
>Do not worry about this now!
>
>Jeff was giving tips that belong to ADVANCED photographers!
>You will appreciate and love Jeff's tips when you will get
>there…



You made my day right there!

> pls let me know what do u mean by 'manually meter
> your scene & zone system'. Do u mean external
> hand held exposure meter? Please explain.

You could use a hand-held meter (I use a Sekonic L-308 when I'm shooting with a manual camera), but the one in your Nikon will work just fine.

Daniel's recommended settings will get you there.

A point of study that you might consider is to do a Google search on "exposure triangle" (shutter speed, aperture, ISO). Once you gain an understanding of how these three settings interact, all of this will become second nature.

The short-hand version is:

Shutter Speed: Longer = more light = more exposure, but at the expense of potential motion blur (either from camera shake or a moving subject). Shorter shutter speed = less light = less exposure, but with the potential advantages of freezing motion and minimizing the effects of camera shake.

Aperture: Smaller number = bigger opening = more light = more exposure, but with reduced depth of field, which may or may not be desired...generally portrait photographers desire shallow depth of field so they shoot with fast lenses and numerically small apertures (big openings), landscape photographers generally desire deeper depth of field so they shoot with numerically higher apertures (smaller openings). There are lots of trade-offs on this one. Generally, a lens is going to have a "sweet spot" somewhere in the middle: Wide open (numerically low apertures) tend to be a bit "softer" (less sharp images), while very high apertures (small opening) diffraction begins to occur. There are no hard and fast rules on this, so its a matter of gaining an understanding of how your equipment behaves under different settings.

ISO: Low number = low light sensitivity = low noise. High number = high light sensitivity = high(er) noise. Absent a very specific artistic intent otherwise, there is no "penalty" for a low ISO: You always want to use the lowest possible ISO value (subject to the constraints of shutter speed and aperture).

In Daniel's excellent recommendations above, what he is doing is suggesting a high aperture (f22) which will give you the deep depth of field you desire for a landscape shot, combined with "aperture priority" mode operation, which means the camera will use its internal light meter to calculate the required shutter speed based on the aperture you specified. That should give you a reasonable exposure for the shot.

As Daniel further explains, if the shutter speed calculated by the camera is too slow (ie, less than 1/125 s which risks creating visible camera shake blur in the image) you can induce the camera to increase shutter speed by adjusting the ISO upward. In other words, by increasing the ISO, the camera is able to use a faster shutter speed.

On the other hand, if the shutter speed is over 1/125 s, we might call that "needlessly fast" for a landscape scene since there is no need to freeze motion. Better to lower the ISO, which will cause the camera to re-calculate a slower shutter speed, resulting in better image quality (again, because low ISO is always better).

Best of luck to you!!

Visit my Nikonians gallery
Most of my Nikon photos end up here.

  

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RRowlett Silver Member Charter MemberFri 31-May-13 09:13 PM
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#8. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 0


Hamilton, US
          

Basically fine approach. I make it simpler still:

Choose an aperture for DOF. F/11 or F/16 might be enough at wide angle.
Read off the hyperfocal distance, and focus on something that approximate distance.
Matrix meter. Shoot.
Look at the histogram. Red channel too, it blows out first. OK? Done. Highlights overexposed? Dial in some exposure compensation and try again. OK? Done.

If you have to dial in more than -2.0 EV, consider HDR.

That's my general approach. There's no one way.

Cheers.

  

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JosephK Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his excellent and frequent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community in the Nikonians spirit. Nikonian since 17th Apr 2006Fri 31-May-13 09:55 PM
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#9. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 8


Seattle, WA, US
          

That is a nice, simple approach.

Alternatively, if you want to play with the spot metering, take readings of the bright part and dark part of the scene and average them as a starting point.

---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
Joseph K
Seattle, WA, USA

D700, D200, D70S, 24-70mm f/2.8, VR 70-200mm f/2.8 II,
50mm f/1.4 D, 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 DX

  

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Toby01 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Nov 2012Sat 01-Jun-13 03:03 AM
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#10. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 0


El Sobrante, US
          

Hi, Devrishi.

Since shooting digitally doesn't cost you anything for shots you throw away, you can simplify your setup by using AF-S and matrix metering. Set the focus point where you want the camera to focus (3 feet away in your example) and take a shot. Check the histogram and adjust exposure compensation as needed. Then take another shot and check the histogram. Repeat with different exposure compensation values until you get the exposure you want. For landscapes where you don't have moving subjects, this method can get you to your target pretty quickly.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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dagoldst Silver Member Nikonian since 02nd Dec 2012Sat 01-Jun-13 11:52 AM
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#11. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 0


Little Rock, US
          

>Hello,
>
>I want to take a landscape shot having infinite depth of field
>with Spot/centre weighted metering... Please guide..
>

I am going to respond mostly to the exposure issue you are wondering about.

If you are going to shoot landscape with digital, shoot raw, use your histogram. Shoot matrix. Get a quality tripod and remote release. If you don't want HDR, get a GND filter. It's about that simple.

If you see blown highlights at zero EV exposure compensation, then compensate down, and check histogram.

Your camera has plenty of DR, you just need to learn how to exploit it. A good editor like Lightroom will allow you to take your RAW image that has retained good highlights and recover excellent shadow detail.

Remember, more of the DR of the newer cameras is BELOW middle gray. Generally, that means you can somewhat underexpose to maintain your highlights and still get a very good shadow recovery in post with a quality editor.

Just a perspective,

David

"Sawed that board three times and it is still too short... "

  

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Devrishi Silver Member Nikonian since 23rd Apr 2013Sat 01-Jun-13 01:21 PM
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#12. "RE: Landscape shot having complete DOF with Spot/CW metering..."
In response to Reply # 11


Kanpur, IN
          

I thank each & every nikonian here who replied to my nonsense / confused question... may be I asked the same from a confused state of mind. Today I shot over 100 pics in different metering modes with +/- ev values & that resolved my confusion.

Thank you gentlemen for all your answers... there is so much to learn here... in case if I need any other clarification / information, I will not hesitate to ask on this forum again

Best regards,

Devrishi

Sandeep Prakash Srivastava

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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