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Subject: "Quality problem with D7000" Previous topic | Next topic
eljaysheffield Registered since 29th May 2013Wed 29-May-13 05:15 PM
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"Quality problem with D7000"


GB
          

I have just bought a Nikon D7000 after using a d80 for six years but after taking it away travelling for a week, I have come back to 600 bad quality images and i am bitterly disappointed. I can only assume that it is my fault but I have used generally the same settings and style of photography as I used on my D80 with which I never had any problems at all. As an amateur photographer and graphic designer, I am critical of my work and like to check and process all images in NX2 but this time they are too far gone to rectify to my standards.

All of my recent images are done with aperture priority, most 100 or 200 ISO and using mainly between f8 and f14. All of the images are quite blurred in both foreground and background and the colours on most are shocking – dull or with huge amounts of darkness and highlights blown out. At 100@ they are unusable and I can only settle for 6x4 prints. It is like they have been taken on a cheap camera and there is no definition, sharpness or detail. I used two lenses that I regularly use – Nikon AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm 3.5-5.6G VR and a wide angle Tokina SD 12-24mm F4 (IF) DX. Both have got hundreds of great shots in the past with the D80. I always shoot in RAW so I can do the post-processing in Capture NX2 and I always use the best quality settings. I switch the D-Lighting off.

I had the camera's autofocus set on AF-A and fear that this may be the problem as my subjects were landscapes, buildings and general scenery but I have never had any problem with my D80 using the same settings. Am I doing something fundamentally wrong with this D7000 or could there be a problem with the autofocus and light metre?
Any advice would be appreciated.

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
elec164 Silver Member
29th May 2013
1
Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
km6xz Moderator
29th May 2013
2
Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
eljaysheffield
29th May 2013
3
     Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
km6xz Moderator
30th May 2013
4
Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
RLDubbya Silver Member
30th May 2013
5
Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
eljaysheffield
30th May 2013
6
     Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
RLDubbya Silver Member
30th May 2013
8
     Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
Omaha
30th May 2013
9
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Toby01 Silver Member
30th May 2013
10
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ericbowles Moderator
02nd Jun 2013
18
Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
Puddlepyrate2013 Silver Member
30th May 2013
11
Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
eljaysheffield
31st May 2013
12
     Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
Daveecopping Silver Member
31st May 2013
13
     Reply message RE: Quality problem with D7000
mjhach Silver Member
31st May 2013
14
Reply message check exposure compensation is not on a value other th...
ardoluc
01st Jun 2013
15
Reply message RE: check exposure compensation is not on a value othe...
RRowlett Silver Member
01st Jun 2013
16
Reply message Read This
chesterdawg Silver Member
02nd Jun 2013
17
Reply message GREAT SITE ON PROFESSIONNAL PHOTOGRAPHY
ardoluc
03rd Jun 2013
19

elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Wed 29-May-13 05:34 PM
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#1. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Welcome to Nikonians!

I, like you, came from a D80 to a D7000. But my experience seems to be the direct opposite of yours in that I find the DNR and image quality better.

How are you determining the lack of sharpness/focus? Keep in mind that viewing at 100% in an editor is dramatically different. You went from 10MP to 16MP. So with the D7000 at 100% view on the average monitor is like looking at a door sized print with your nose to the glass. With that type of magnification you will see slight flaws in your technique that might not be problematic when viewing a D80 file at 100%.

Perhaps if you could host a full sized image with the EXIF data intact somewhere like Flickr and provide a link here so we can better evaluate what you might be experiencing.

Pete

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Wed 29-May-13 06:19 PM
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#2. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


St Petersburg, RU
          

Welcome to Nikonians
There are so many potential causes that without examples no one here will be able to determine the problem. Please post images that show the problem either on the forum of to your gallery so we inspect the metadata/exif data for settings, focus point etc.

The D80 was a less complex camera with far fewer adjustments available that could impact the results.
Using AF-A introduces an additional variable that is out of your control so if you suspect focusing problems, you should use AF-S when shooting static subjects and on a tripod and AF-C when either or both the camera and subject are not static.
Are the images that fail being viewed at normal viewing distance printed with sufficient resolution? If it is viewing at 100% or more, you are viewing much greater magnification than 100% on the D80, so avoid viewing at 100% until you get a handle on what is going on.
The D80 had several stops less DR than a D7000 and in fact the DR on the D7000 at the ISOs you are using, it has the best DR of all but a couple cameras ever made. This problem you are seeing with exposure might be related to not being familiar with the metering choices or even the 3rd party lens not being able to communicate with the D7000 since its chip was probably programmed before the D7000 was introduced.
Lots of possibilities, not enough information yet.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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eljaysheffield Registered since 29th May 2013Wed 29-May-13 06:44 PM
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#3. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 2


GB
          

Thanks Stan,
All of the RAW files are around 20Mb so I can't post them but I could send a few in the morning by an FTP such as www.wetransfer.com but I would need your email address to send you the link. I fear that it may be me using AF-A focus instead of AF-S but I didn't realise they would come out looking so bad with AF-A. I view them in Capture NX2 and not enlarge any bigger than 100%. Even at 25% they are not sharp and the colours are dead.

  

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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Thu 30-May-13 05:15 AM
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#4. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 3


St Petersburg, RU
          

To see the nature of the images, a 300kb jpg posted is fine as long as the exif data is intact.
If the problem is mostly lacking sharpness and flat colors the problem may be simpler. After the D80, Nikon changed their default jpg rendering settings to a more neutral set. The D90 had a lot of initial complaints and D7000 also, but it was a benefit in cameras that had wider dr.
Setting Picture Controls to add sharpening, and contrast made all the difference for many of us. The default sharpening reduced sharpening artifacts that were objectionable when higher res files were being post processed. Sharpening had by that time, become more effective in post processing using selective sharpening.
The D7000 Vivid PC is closer to the default settings of the D80. A sharpening value of 6-7 is most often used by D7000 owners.
NX2 reads the PC selected present information so renders the RAW file as if those PC settings were baked in. They aren't so you have full control of that rendering post capture. The only in-camera adjustment that is not fully reversible is Active D Lighting. The mid boost portion of the file changes are but not the highlight protection since that is does by lowering exposure a little at capture.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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RLDubbya Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Dec 2011Thu 30-May-13 11:31 AM
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#5. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

You should be prepared for a learning curve with your new camera. You didn't post such details, but many have found that they have to shoot with higher shutter speeds than they used on earlier, lower resolution cameras.

Another variable you mention is AF-A. While I'm not familiar with the D80, I'd bet that the AF-A is significantly different in that camera. So, eliminate the AF-A variable, and shoot some stuff around the house in AF-S mode. Figure out if that's the problem.

Then, learn the new AF-A system.

You may also need to learn the exposure metering system. For example, in Matrix Mode, the D7000 makes some decisions based upon what it believes the image to consist of, and will optimize certain areas of the image at the expense of others. If you're not experienced with how Matrix Mode works in a given situation, this could take you by surprise. Here, I'd make sure I did some work in spot-mode.

The D7000 is really capable of some great images.

It's certainly possible that you got a bad sample. However, by eliminating some of the newer automation and other differences (so, shoot in AF-S, spot meter mode, and raise the shutter speed), I think you can pretty quickly determine if you got a lemon or if you need to work on technique.

Have fun with your new camera!

  

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eljaysheffield Registered since 29th May 2013Thu 30-May-13 12:10 PM
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#6. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 5


GB
          

Thanks,
I have just shot a few (while it wasn't raining) in AF-C and the difference in quality has showed me that I have been shooting wrongly in AF-A mode. That is what happens when you buy a new camera the week before you go travelling and don't learn the new technology. This might sound like a daft question but I have 600 travel shots all taken in AF-A mode in RAW. Is there an outside chance that Capture NX2 can change the settings during post processing or have I really got 600 unreversible but semi-OK pics?
Thanks again,
Lee

  

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RLDubbya Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Dec 2011Thu 30-May-13 01:28 PM
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#8. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 6


US
          

>Thanks,
>I have just shot a few (while it wasn't raining) in AF-C and
>the difference in quality has showed me that I have been
>shooting wrongly in AF-A mode. That is what happens when you
>buy a new camera the week before you go travelling and don't
>learn the new technology. This might sound like a daft
>question but I have 600 travel shots all taken in AF-A mode in
>RAW. Is there an outside chance that Capture NX2 can change
>the settings during post processing or have I really got 600
>unreversible but semi-OK pics?
>Thanks again,
>Lee
>


Well, at least you're getting some answers.

I'm not a big user of Capture NX2. Topaz Labs have trial versions of all their tools - 30 days - and they have a tool called "InFocus" which might help. It's free, relatively easy to use, and might help you out a bit.

  

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Omaha Registered since 07th Jan 2012Thu 30-May-13 02:21 PM
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#9. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 6


Omaha, US
          

Photography enthusiasts like us tend to be overly-critical of images, always seeking technical perfection. You may be surprised at how much your family appreciates these photos.

Visit my Nikonians gallery
Most of my Nikon photos end up here.

  

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Toby01 Silver Member Nikonian since 19th Nov 2012Thu 30-May-13 04:38 PM
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#10. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 6


El Sobrante, US
          

Since you shot in RAW mode, CNX2 will allow you to change all of your settings for color, contrast, tone curve etc. The one thing it can't help you fix is out-of-focus shots. If AF-A mode caused most of your shots to be focused incorrectly, I'm not aware of any way to fix that problem. If your problem is with color rendition, however, try adjusting things in CNX2.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Sun 02-Jun-13 11:22 AM
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#18. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 6


Atlanta, US
          

Capture NX2 cannot change the focus setting. You may be able to improve the sharpness with editing of other settings such as removing noise reduction. You can also modify a picture control setting to apply more sharpening.

I had a similar experience with AF-A. I found it to be unreliable when a stationary subject began to move. But I did not find that it was the reason for large numbers of soft images - especially with aperture settings of f/8 to f/14.

Are you using Single or one of the Dynamic AF modes?


Eric Bowles
Nikonians Team
My Gallery
Workshops

Nikonians membership — my most important photographic investment, after the camera

  

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Puddlepyrate2013 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2013Thu 30-May-13 07:18 PM
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#11. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 0


Portsmouth, US
          

The D7000 has a 3.0 inch 921,000 screen on the back of it. Purpose of this screen is for use in live mode or reviewing images taken for quality control. After taking 5 pictures or so, most prudent photographers would do an image review to ensure proper results. Then adjust the camera accordingly. Not doing this and just taking 600 pictures expecting glorious results, always ends in failure. Maybe lesson learned, maybe not. Best advice, take the time and read the manual. Nikon does include it free with every camera sold for a reason.

Bob

  

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eljaysheffield Registered since 29th May 2013Fri 31-May-13 07:01 AM
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#12. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 11


GB
          

Yes you are right. I simply assumed that my new D7000 was the same as the D80 but better and merrily took 600 mediochre shots. I bought it a week before going away and didn't learn the extras. Definitely a harsh lesson learned. CNX2 will fix the majority of problems and family and friends will never know the difference, I just won't be able to get my enlargements this time.
Thanks everyone.
Lee

  

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Daveecopping Silver Member Nikonian since 21st Jan 2011Fri 31-May-13 08:21 AM
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#13. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 12


Polegate, GB
          

Lee, I have learned something from this thread as well.

Dave

  

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mjhach Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Dec 2010Fri 31-May-13 05:43 PM
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#14. "RE: Quality problem with D7000"
In response to Reply # 12


Simcoe, CA
          

Maybe keeping the D80 would be prudent during your learning phase with the D7000, unless, of course you needed the money to pay for the D7000, and no longer have it.

I would also recommend, and I'm sure others in this Nikonians group would concur, that you purchase Darrel Young's book "Mastering the D7000". It presents the information found in the owners manual in a better organizational arrangement facilitating one's understanding of the cameras features and controls.

Mike

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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ardoluc Registered since 16th Feb 2013Sat 01-Jun-13 04:05 AM
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#15. "check exposure compensation is not on a value other than 0.0"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 02-Jun-13 02:18 AM by ardoluc

saint-jean-sur-richelieu, CA
          

1-A thing that should be checked first , is if your exposure compensation is not set to zero. One day after using a flash exposure compensation to +2 ev, I forgot to set it back to 0.0 afterward and ended up with a bunch of overexposed pics (washed colors, low contrast, etc.)
2- Blurred pics are mostly caused by speed settings to slow. On the D7000 with its high density sensor, we should avoid min speed settings below 1/ (2* focal length). For instance if I am at a focal length of 50 mm I will use a faster speed than 1/(2*50)= 1/100 sec, like 1/125 sec. If for any reason you can not increase the shutter speed many people claim by taking a series of pics in Ch mode (high speed), you have the chance to have a few without any blur.
3- to avoid slow speed, use in the D7000 shooting menu the "Iso sensitivity settings" and set "auto sensitivity control to ON" choosing the minimum shutter speed following the rule of 1/(2* focal lenght), and setting the maximum sensitivity you want to allow. The Iso sensitivity value is the iso value that you want the sensitivity to be set when there is plenty of light. Remember that a high ISO pic is much better than a blurred one at low iso (unusable).
4- set your camera in aperture "A" mode, so you can set the F stop that suits you, for non moving or slow moving subject.

  

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RRowlett Silver Member Charter MemberSat 01-Jun-13 05:29 PM
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#16. "RE: check exposure compensation is not on a value other than 0.0"
In response to Reply # 15


Hamilton, US
          

I think #3 is worth reading again for D7100 users. This sensor is so much better than the early generation sensors that you do not need to worry so much about ISO. I think you would have a hard time determining the difference between ISO 100 and ISO 800 shots unless you zoom to 100%, which you will not do even with large prints.

I'm playing around with having AUTO ISO on all the time, and capping it at ISO 800 outdoors. This way, the camera can do a lot of the grunt work keeping shutter speed fast enough for sharp images. When AUTO ISO gets to 800, then I pay closer attention to shutter speed when in A mode. Without ISO AUTO, I would spend more time composing, looking at the exposure settings, dialing up the ISO, re-metering, etc. If you use CPU lenses, AUTO ISO will also account for focal length and VR when adjusting your shutter speeds and setting ISO. It works reasonably well. To stack things in your favor even more to get sharp images, fire off a burst of 3-5 shots. At least one of these shots will be collected during a quiescent moment in camera shake. I've taken sharp images at 300 mm at 1/80 s (non VR) with bursts. One image is almost always a keeper.

Cheers.

  

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chesterdawg Silver Member Nikonian since 04th Jul 2010Sun 02-Jun-13 02:58 AM
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#17. "Read This"
In response to Reply # 0


Commerce, US
          

http://www.pixelfinesse.com/_docs/D7000_AF_Explained.pdf


Steve

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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ardoluc Registered since 16th Feb 2013Mon 03-Jun-13 01:30 PM
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#19. "GREAT SITE ON PROFESSIONNAL PHOTOGRAPHY"
In response to Reply # 17


saint-jean-sur-richelieu, CA
          

To learn more on photography particularly on Nikon cameras. Here is a link on how '' the autofocus on Nikon cameras works such as the D7000".
The owner of the site is Nasim Mansurov a talented professionnal photographer.

http://photographylife.com/dslr-autofocus-modes-explained

Have a good day
Luc

  

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