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pgalligan Registered since 11th Dec 2012Mon 25-Feb-13 10:45 AM
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"D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"


AU
          

I got a D7000 last week and so far have shot nearly 2000 photos while learning it's capabilities. It's an upgrade to my old D70s which I still have.

I was shooting in a gym tonight (Olympic Weightlifting) and noticed that some photos in a burst appear to have a different exposure even though the exposure settings were identical. I was using manual exposure with no Auto ISO or flash.

The gym uses flourescent lights so I'm wondering whether this has something to do with it? If so is there anything I can do to avoid it? If not, does anyone have any other clues?

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
durgaprasadzone
25th Feb 2013
1
Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
jbloom Gold Member
25th Feb 2013
2
Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
briantilley Moderator
25th Feb 2013
3
Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
blw Moderator
25th Feb 2013
4
Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
jbloom Gold Member
25th Feb 2013
5
Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
blw Moderator
25th Feb 2013
7
     Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
pgalligan
25th Feb 2013
8
          Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
blw Moderator
25th Feb 2013
9
          Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
jbloom Gold Member
26th Feb 2013
10
               Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
pgalligan
26th Feb 2013
11
Reply message RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure
pgalligan
25th Feb 2013
6

durgaprasadzone Registered since 25th Feb 2013Mon 25-Feb-13 10:46 AM
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#1. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          




Thanks for sharing information. Actually I had also the same question in mind for a long time anyways you started this thread & I am so happy.

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jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004Mon 25-Feb-13 11:16 AM
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#2. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 0


Wethersfield, US
          

I'm guessing that not only did the exposure change, but the color as well. Some fluorescent light systems vary with the power cycle, 60 or 50 times a second. When shooting at shutter speeds faster than 1/60, you're exposing for only part of that light cycle and may get different amounts of light with different images.

There's a limited amount you can do about it. One obvious fix is to slow the shutter speed if the subject can be properly photographed at the slower speed. That doesn't work well for most sports. You can also try allowing the camera's metering to adjust, using Auto ISO, for example, although that won't help with the color shifts. Shooting in RAW will give you more latitude for fixing the problem in each image on your computer.

Or you could encourage the venue to replace their old magnetic fluorescent ballasts with modern electronic ones that operate the lamps at higher frequencies and don't exhibit this problem. Since those are more efficient, too, it's really in their best interest. (Most of the venues I shoot in around here have switched already.)

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Mon 25-Feb-13 11:16 AM
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#3. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 25-Feb-13 11:16 AM by briantilley

Paignton, GB
          


It is likely that what you are seeing is indeed caused by the fluorescent lighting. Such lights tend to vary in intensity (and colour temperature too) in time with cycling of the AC supply. It's not a camera or lens fault.

This is a well-known problem for sports photographers. Slower shutter speeds can help (by encompassing a complete cycle), but with fast action that often leads to motion blur

You'll probably get more ideas over in our Sports Forum.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Mon 25-Feb-13 11:40 AM
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#4. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

This is an old problem - and it's due to the lights. There is nothing you can do about it, other than perhaps to shoot in raw and be prepared to fix in post processing if one of the "dip" shots happens to be the keeper. (And it will be, due to Murphy's Law!) At some venues - basically the ones where there are big time TV lights - there is enough lighting on different circuits that the problem never appears. For example, look at the lighting failure in the Super Bowl... half of the power and light came from one electrical grid, the other half came from somewhere else. In situations such as that, the lights are out of phase to each other and you won't see the dips. But of course that dual supply costs lots of money, so you typically won't see it short of the Big Time - ie MLB, NFL, NHL, I assume NBA, etc.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

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jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004Mon 25-Feb-13 12:26 PM
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#5. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 4


Wethersfield, US
          

>At some venues - basically the ones
>where there are big time TV lights - there is enough lighting
>on different circuits that the problem never appears.

Many venues are operating from muultiphase power sources. Even in small gyms, you are likely to have lights operating on different phases:
http://www.nikonians.org/forums/dcboard.php?az=set_threaded_mode&forum=167&topic_id=16477&prev_page=show_topic&gid=16477#16477

I haven't run across this problem too much with outdoor field lighting, even at smaller venues. Most reasonably modern metal-halide systems give fairly consistent light, even though they are probably using inductive ballasts. (The cost of electronic ballasts increases dramatically as the power level increases, and they don't make the metal-halide lamps themselves more efficient, in contrast to use of electronic ballasts with fluorescent lamps.) There are a few venues, though, that really cause problems.

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Mon 25-Feb-13 09:17 PM
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#7. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 5


Richmond, US
          

I've had LOTS of trouble with this at minor league baseball parks. Some of them are ancient (the lights at the local MiLB park are > 30 years old) and some are brand new (one park in NC was less than a season old). I asked the local stadium grounds keeper about the lights, which is how I found out that they were from the 1970s. I forget how much it would cost to upgrade them but it was far into the six digits. He'd obviously been asked the question before!

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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pgalligan Registered since 11th Dec 2012Mon 25-Feb-13 10:01 PM
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#8. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 7


AU
          

Actually I only really want them to upgrade the lifting platform so I can take some decent photos during competitions. The platform is 4m x 4m (about 13ft square). There are some harsh overhead spot lights in addition to two banks of fluros (and of course they are a different colour).

Is there a way I can calculate how much extra light we would need based on how many extra stops I need?

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Mon 25-Feb-13 10:57 PM
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#9. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 8


Richmond, US
          

Well, 4m x 4m is a much simpler problem than a baseball stadium! That might be possible with just a few lights.

> Is there a way I can calculate how much extra light we would need based on how many extra stops I need?

I don't think it's that easy. The problem is that there are occasional dips, so that 90% of the frames are fine as it is. If you add light, you'll just raise the overall light level - and the dips will still be dips. Unless you can somehow synchronize the additional light into the dips, it won't help.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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jbloom Gold Member Awarded for the continuous and generous sharing of his high level expertise and his always encouraging comments in several forums. Nikonian since 15th Jul 2004Tue 26-Feb-13 12:04 AM
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#10. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 8


Wethersfield, US
          

Each stop is a doubling of the light, so if you need one stop that would be twice as much light. If you need two stops, that would be 4 times as much light. Three stops, 8 times the light. And so on.

-- Jon
Wethersfield, CT, USA
Connecticut High School Sports Photos

  

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pgalligan Registered since 11th Dec 2012Tue 26-Feb-13 12:35 AM
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#11. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 10


AU
          

Hi Jon, I do understand that much. I was just wondering if any knew how to relate that to number/power of extra lights we would need?

I would actually like to get rid of the two fluro banks above the platform, which would fix the colour/dipping issue.

Cheers

  

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pgalligan Registered since 11th Dec 2012Mon 25-Feb-13 12:48 PM
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#6. "RE: D7000 continuous shooting and exposure"
In response to Reply # 4


AU
          

Thanks everyone for the quick replies. Yes the colour has been changing too, which I noticed straight away since I had set the WB to flourescent. When I thought about it I figured it had to be the lights so thanks for confirming that.

I will probably just put up with it. I'm already talking to the venue about upgrading the lighting but I suspect I'll still be shooting wide open if/when they do upgrade as they do not have plentiful funds.

  

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