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Subject: "It's cold!" Previous topic | Next topic
dentalpiano Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Aug 2010Wed 31-Oct-12 01:41 PM
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"It's cold!"


US
          

We finally managed to move to Colorado (from FL). I am as happy as I can be.
But, I am a bit concerned with my D7000 and the cold.
Is there anything that I need to do ro preserve my camera, and still take pictures of nature at 20 degress (or under). Like, do they sell chains for the camera's tires?

Thanks,

A chance to cut is a chance to heal...

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: It's cold!
SheriB Silver Member
31st Oct 2012
1
Reply message RE: It's cold!
dm1dave Administrator
01st Nov 2012
2
Reply message RE: It's cold!
blw Moderator
01st Nov 2012
3
Reply message RE: It's cold!
km6xz Moderator
01st Nov 2012
4
     Reply message RE: It's cold!
dentalpiano Silver Member
04th Nov 2012
5
     Reply message RE: It's cold!
offrdk5
26th Nov 2012
6
          Reply message RE: It's cold!
km6xz Moderator
26th Nov 2012
7
               Reply message RE: It's cold!
mjhach Silver Member
26th Nov 2012
8
                    Reply message RE: It's cold!
sabbey51 Silver Member
30th Nov 2012
9

SheriB Silver Member Awarded for sharing her exceptional images and details of rural farm life. Nikonian since 11th Sep 2010Wed 31-Oct-12 02:34 PM
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#1. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

Hi
There are lots of threads on the site that answer your questions if you do a search.
Basically when dealing with cold, you have to deal with battery drain and condensation worries. Going from the warm to the cold isn't a big deal, it is bringing your cold equipment back to the warm that you need to take some precautionary steps.Some of the suggestions you will find are keeping your equipment in the camera bag for a few hours until it acclimates , and packing your gear in a plastic bag with as much air squeezed out as possible so condensation forms on the bag.
So what precautions did you take in FL when going from AC to outside humidity? Some of that would be the same idea..

Sheri Becker

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dm1dave Administrator Awarded for high level knowledge and skills in various areas, most notably in Wildlife and Landscape Nikonian since 12th Sep 2006Thu 01-Nov-12 02:39 AM
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#2. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 0


Lowden, US
          

The D7000 will do just fine in those temps.
The battery will drain more quickly than usual but it not too bad until you get into single digit temps. Then the drain can be fairly fast. I keep a second battery in an inside pocket, next to my skin, so that it stays warm. When you battery starts getting low just swap out the cold battery with the warm one and put the cold one in the same pocket. After a while the first battery will warm up and regain most of its charge. In temps of around 20°F I can shoot for 4 or 5 hours and only need to swap batteries once near the end of the day. When you get closer to 10°F you may need to change batteries in about an hour.

I never have any serious issues with condensation in the clod of winter as the humidity is usually low outside and in the house when I return.

Dress in layers and make sure that you find some gloves that allow you to use the camera controls and still keep your hands relatively warm. That said, your hands are likely to get cold so get some chemical hand warmers and put them inside your gloves and a set in your coat pocket so that you get your hands warm quickly.


Have fun in the snow!!

Dave Summers
Lowden, Iowa
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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Thu 01-Nov-12 08:14 AM
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#3. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

Also, 20°F is nothing. The batteries don't have too much trouble with 20 - but getting down near O°F, you will be very surprised at how quickly the batteries disappear! As the others have noted, the thing that does cause annoyance is when the gear has been outside at sub-freezing temps and then you bring it indoors. ESPECIALLY if you go somewhere like a butterfly pavilion, where it's also humid. In that case you can easily have it fog every external surface for a good 15 minutes, and that is precisely the time to have the gear in a plastic bag as it comes up to temperature.

> do they sell chains for the camera's tires?

The closest thing I can think of is a rain cover. If you like being out in the falling snow (or rain), it's a good modest investment.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Thu 01-Nov-12 07:09 PM
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#4. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 3


St Petersburg, RU
          

From my own experience cameras do fine, but shutter speeds can vary in extreme cold. Like other as mentioned, keep spare batteries next to your skin so keep them warm and to warm them up after being removed from the camera in a swap.
My biggest problem with winter shooting is keeping hands functional, particularly with larger all metal lenses that can drain every bit of warmth in your finger in a couple minutes. Mittens are used mostly in really cold climates but they are not great for small buttons and multi-selector switches. The coldest I have shot is mid day temperatures of -57. When really cold, there is little moisture in the air so the only time condensation is a problem is when re-entering a warm building where the humidity is a lot higher. Just before entering the house, put the camera and lens in a zip lock freezer bag and seal it. Set it aside until it raises to room temperature and there should not be any fogging or condensation.
Once I figure out some flexible warm hand protection I will start enjoying winter photography again.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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dentalpiano Silver Member Nikonian since 29th Aug 2010Sun 04-Nov-12 02:01 PM
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#5. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 4


US
          

Thank you all very very much!
I love Nikonians!

A chance to cut is a chance to heal...

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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offrdk5 Registered since 22nd Jun 2008Mon 26-Nov-12 04:24 AM
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#6. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 4


US
          

That is COLD! Wow!!! Dare I ask where you found this temperature and how your body survived this temp as well?

>coldest I have shot is mid day temperatures of -57.

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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Mon 26-Nov-12 09:05 AM
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#7. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 6
Mon 26-Nov-12 08:43 PM by km6xz

St Petersburg, RU
          

It was when I landed in Krasnoyarsk, a southern Siberia city, in Jan 2001. I was invited just after New Years to visit a family I knew there. They met me at the plane with a bear coat and fur mittens, which looked sort of goofy but warm. I have camped out without a tent(tents freeze, so do not breath and sleeping expels enough breath moisture to coat the interior walls with ice, that prevents any exchange of air. A number of explorers in the early days asphyxiated while asleep in their tents exploring the arctic or northern climes), at high altitudes but never at that temperature. Camping means digging snow caves which are pretty cozy if done right, and allow for ventilation.
I spent a week, much of outdoors on that trip. They wanted to take me to see some sites and the normal way of warming the suspension and frame rail metals and fuel lines was to dump a few liters of kerosene on the ice underneath the truck and light it. Without that pre-warming, spring steel breaks easily and gasoline becomes jellied. It is common for long haul subarctic truckers to never shut off their engines until late spring time(June-July).
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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mjhach Silver Member Nikonian since 17th Dec 2010Mon 26-Nov-12 12:25 PM
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#8. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 7


Simcoe, CA
          

Hmmmm. Interesting bit of info.

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sabbey51 Silver Member Nikonian since 10th Jan 2010Fri 30-Nov-12 09:28 PM
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#9. "RE: It's cold!"
In response to Reply # 8


Saddle river, US
          

Condensation is not generally a problem in the cold weather, as it will when you bring your cold camera back into the house after being outside. If you'll need to shoot indoors, just put your camera in a closed Baggie before you come into the house.

It was much worse for me when I visited Mobile AL this summer. I ran out of the house to catch the morning sunrise and some fog, only to have my cool camera (from the A/C) immediately fog up fm the 90% humidity and stay that way until long after I lost the shot. The fix here would have been to leave the cameras out overnight (perhaps in the car) so it never cooled down.

When working outdoors in the winter, I not only keep the spare batteries buried close to my body, but try and keep the camera inside my parka or jacket as much as possible. Of course,cruise requires sufficient room for your body and camera.

  

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Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D7100, D7000 (Public) topic #21851 Previous topic | Next topic


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