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Subject: "D7000 V D90" Previous topic | Next topic
Hawfinch Silver Member Nikonian since 26th Jun 2010Thu 18-Nov-10 08:01 PM
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"D7000 V D90"


GB
          

I know the D7000 has not been available too long but wondered if anyone has done any comparrisons with the D90. Specifically I'd like to know how a cropped shot with a long lens would compare. Would the extra pixels make a big difference to image quality when image enlarged? Thanks Dave

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: D7000 V D90
Chris Ross Leong
18th Nov 2010
1
Reply message RE: D7000 V D90
briantilley Moderator
19th Nov 2010
2
     Reply message RE: D7000 V D90
Chris Ross Leong
19th Nov 2010
3
Reply message RE: D7000 V D90
elec164 Silver Member
19th Nov 2010
4
Reply message RE: D7000 V D90-
Chris Ross Leong
19th Nov 2010
5
     Reply message RE: D7000 V D90-
elec164 Silver Member
21st Nov 2010
6
     Reply message RE: D7000 V D90-
Hawfinch Silver Member
21st Nov 2010
7
          Reply message RE: D7000 V D90-
elec164 Silver Member
22nd Nov 2010
8
               Reply message RE: D7000 V D90-
Hawfinch Silver Member
22nd Nov 2010
9
               Reply message RE: D7000 V D90-
elec164 Silver Member
22nd Nov 2010
10
               Reply message RE: D7000 V D90-
Obes Silver Member
23rd Nov 2010
11

Chris Ross Leong Registered since 18th Nov 2010Thu 18-Nov-10 10:04 PM
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#1. "RE: D7000 V D90"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 19-Nov-10 03:57 PM by Chris Ross Leong

Sherman Oaks, US
          

Hi there.
I used to have a D90 but can't remember the exact specs.
I just did the numbers on the D7000 though, and in my usual manner, I compared this sensor not with other digital ones but with the original 24x36mm Leica (135) stills frame.
Here's what I came up with:

A) DIAGONALS:

FX/135:
24x36mm gate,
aspect ratio 1.5:1 (3:2),
diagonal 43.26mm (i.e. this would be the technical "normal" focal length lens)

D7k:
15.6x23.6mm gate,
aspect ratio 1.513:1
diagonal is 28.289mm - this would be the theoretical "normal" D7000 lens

So the D7k is technically a 1.529 crop factor camera, and not a 1.6x crop as most of the articles would have it be.

So, equivalent focal lengths when compared to the classic FX (film) cameras:

35mm = D7000
==== =======
8mm = 5.23mm
17mm = 11.11mm
20mm = 13 mm
24mm = 16 mm
28mm = 18.3mm
35mm = 23 mm
40mm = 26 mm
50mm = 32.69mm
85mm = 55.57mm
105mm = 68.65mm
135mm = 88.26mm
150mm = 98 mm
180mm = 117.69mm
200mm = 130.76mm
250mm = 163.45mm
300mm = 196.15mm
500mm = 326.92mm
1000mm = 653.81mm

HTH
Cheers!
Chris

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Fri 19-Nov-10 08:14 AM
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#2. "RE: D7000 V D90"
In response to Reply # 1


Paignton, GB
          

>D7k:
>15.6x23.6mm gate,
>aspect ratio 1.513:1
>diagonal is 23.289mm

You have a typo there - the diagonal is 28.289mm

>So the D7k is technically a 1.529 crop factor camera, and not
>a 1.6x crop as most of the articles would have it be.

The crop factor for Nikon's DX format tends to be referred to as 1.5x, but it's generally understood that this is an approximation. Canon's crop sensor cameras, which have a slightly smaller sensor, are approximated as 1.6x.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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Chris Ross Leong Registered since 18th Nov 2010Fri 19-Nov-10 08:49 AM
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#3. "RE: D7000 V D90"
In response to Reply # 2


Sherman Oaks, US
          

What Brian said.

  

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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Fri 19-Nov-10 12:16 PM
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#4. "RE: D7000 V D90"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 19-Nov-10 12:19 PM by elec164

US
          

I participate in a Yahoo forum on digital photography where Dr. Clark is also a member. One thing that really gets him going is when someone uses the term “reach” improperly.

When discussing this he uses the term “Plate Scale” as a means to determine the effective reach of a system. I am not saying I understand it all, but using his calculations I come up with this.

A D90 with a 300mm lens taking an image of a bird about 20 inches in size at a distance of 164 feet would place approximately 545 pixels on the bird.

A D7000 taking the same shot would put about 638 pixels on the bird or a net gain of about 93 pixels.

Conversely a D80 would place about 500 pixels on the bird or a net gain of 138 pixels.


At least I think I calculated all that correctly.

If you’re interested here is the article that discusses all this. The Plate scale calculations are toward the bottom of the article.
http://www.clarkvision.com/articles/cropfactor/index.html

I did a preliminary test with the moon as a target and there appears to be a big resolution gain using the D7000 in comparison to shots with my D80 with the D7000 resolving much more detail.


Pete

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Chris Ross Leong Registered since 18th Nov 2010Fri 19-Nov-10 03:42 PM
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#5. "RE: D7000 V D90-"
In response to Reply # 4


Sherman Oaks, US
          

Thanks for that - great information!
------

  

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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Sun 21-Nov-10 03:01 AM
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#6. "RE: D7000 V D90-"
In response to Reply # 5


US
          

I’m glad you found the info useful Chris. But just keep in mind that his comment about the constant he used only being useful for small angles of view that you get with telephoto lenses.

I’m surprised that no D90 users chose to opine on this. In that other forum debates about crop advantage, lens quality as in consumer variable focal length versus fixed focal length often arise and get heated. So Dr. Clark suggested we all submit images to compare, and he suggested using the moon for it is a target we all see that would be more or less a constant.

In that vane I offer these for you to consider taken with my D80 and D7000 with the 70-300 VR lens at 300mm. Perhaps not the most artistic images but should give Hawfinch an idea of what to expect. If someone with a D90 and 300mm lens would like to add their image it would help even more. I assume that a D90 would be a tad better then my D80, and the difference between a D90 and D7000 would be somewhat less significant than with my D80.

The first two images are 100% crops of the D80 and D7000 with the third image being an up-sample of the D80 to provide a similar size on screen of the D7000.










Hope this helps you out.

Pete

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Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)
Attachment #3, (jpg file)

  

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Hawfinch Silver Member Nikonian since 26th Jun 2010Sun 21-Nov-10 05:39 PM
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#7. "RE: D7000 V D90-"
In response to Reply # 5


GB
          

Thanks for postind this information Pete. Very good of you. Any change of comparrison shot of say a small object at distance (15m or so)enlarge and cropped? Dave

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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Mon 22-Nov-10 02:10 AM
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#8. "RE: D7000 V D90-"
In response to Reply # 7
Mon 22-Nov-10 02:21 AM by elec164

US
          

Well it’s all-relative and keeping things in perspective, the samples provide are a severe crop. In fact it would be a similar scenario as the calculations I provided for imaging a 20-inch bird (about 50cm) at 164 feet (about 50m). Only with the moon it’s about a 2,159-mile diameter (3476km) with a distance of about 248,548 miles (400,000km). At 300mm I was only getting about 540 pixels on the diameter of the moon with the D7000.

Here is the whole D7000 capture to give you an idea of the severe amount of crop.






So Dave it depends on your definition of small, and what focal length you will be using to image it at a distance of 15 meters. Will there be a difference between the D90 and D7000, well yes there will be. Is it going to be significant, that is up to the individual, but I say it probably will not be.

Pete


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Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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Hawfinch Silver Member Nikonian since 26th Jun 2010Mon 22-Nov-10 07:51 AM
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#9. "RE: D7000 V D90-"
In response to Reply # 8


GB
          

Thanks Pete, I'd be using a 300mm F2.8 with 2X converter. Object being size of small bird at 15 - 20 ft.

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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Mon 22-Nov-10 12:57 PM
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#10. "RE: D7000 V D90-"
In response to Reply # 9


US
          

In the article I linked to were three formulas that would allow you to calculate the amount of pixels that would be on the subject. The formulas are only good for narrow angles, as you would get using telephoto lenses.

First you need to know the plate scale which is derived by the formula “PS= 206265*pixel pitch/focal length”. At 600mm the D7000 would be 1.61574 and the D90 would be 1.89076.

Then you need to know the angular size of the subject arrived at by the formula “206265*subject size/distance”. A 4-inch long bird at 20 feet would have an angular size of about 3437.75 arc-seconds across.

To find the amount of pixels on the subject you use the formula “angular size/plate scale”.

So using a 600mm focal length imaging a 4 inch long bird at 20 feet, the D7000 would have about 2127 pixels on the length of the bird and the D90 would have about 1818 pixels.

So the D7000 will resolve a bit more detail then the D90 and allow for slightly more PPI for a given crop and print size. Both prints will look good under close scrutiny on their own. But if you place them side by side and do a close comparison, the D7000 print might be chosen by the average person as the better looking one.


Pete

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Obes Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Aug 2009Tue 23-Nov-10 01:06 AM
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#11. "RE: D7000 V D90-"
In response to Reply # 8


Brisbane, AU
          

The megapixel thing is a pointless discussion.

Things the D7000 does that the D90 doesn't. That might effect your ability to use a long lens.
Heaps more focus points.
Mirror up mode. (No slap)
Quiet mode. (Animals)
AI and AI-S lenses and matrix metering. (not so much I guess)
Better high ISO (with out a doubt) thus faster shutter, thus cleaner shots in less then perfect circumstances. (or cleaner shots and thus better crops at the same ISO)
AF focus adjustment.

Then there are things that probably have 0 effect to that exact question but are still definate upgrades
2 SD Cards.
Higher frame rate.
1/250 instead of 1/200 flash sync. (meh... I need 1/500th)

I "upgraded" from a d90 and love it. The D200 to D90 felt like an upgrade in places and downgrade in others. The D7000 feels better then my D200 in everyway (but 1... bracketing) and thus is a definate upgrade to the D90.

The only thing I want that the D200 had is 5 frame bracketing instead of 3. (Or even +-2ev braketing, ideally +-4 ev).

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