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Subject: "My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet" Previous topic | Next topic
mhiker Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Dec 2010Tue 06-Dec-11 11:23 PM
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"My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
Tue 06-Dec-11 11:24 PM by mhiker

Holiday, US
          

I thought I would test for sensor dust when out the other day so I shot some at f/22 and sure enough we have lots of sensor dust on my D7K. A few are visible in the attached picture and many more appear when viewed at 1:1 The spots are barely visible at f/11 and as expected, completely disappear when shot at f/8 or <.

My D90 has been in service longer and not a speck of sensor dust shows up.

Is there something special in the D7000's design that would cause it to be a dust magnet? Just curious to know if others have seen this more often than with other Nikon cameras.





Michael

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
Len Shepherd Gold Member
07th Dec 2011
1
Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
mhiker Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
2
     Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
billD80 Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
3
          Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
mhiker Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
8
               Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
billD80 Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
10
Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
Drbee Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
4
Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
jadiniz
07th Dec 2011
5
Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
billD80 Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
7
     Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
jadiniz
07th Dec 2011
11
     Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
mhiker Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
12
          Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
billD80 Silver Member
08th Dec 2011
13
               Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
mhiker Silver Member
08th Dec 2011
14
Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
mhiker Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
9
Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
Gamecocks Silver Member
07th Dec 2011
6
Reply message RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet
PeterBeckett Gold Member
08th Dec 2011
15

Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003Wed 07-Dec-11 08:05 AM
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#1. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 0


Yorkshire, GB
          

There are 2 types of "dust".
There is "ordinary dust" easily removed by using using the clean sensor option in the camera set up menu. You can select the clean sensor function to work each time you switch the camera on.
There is also "sticky dust" such as some pollen grains.
If using the camera sensor clean function does not get rid of the dust your sensor needs a special clean.
Pre "clean sensor" being built into cameras a lot of dust could be removed by using a rocket type blower brush.

Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

  

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mhiker Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Dec 2010Wed 07-Dec-11 04:50 PM
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#2. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 1


Holiday, US
          

Thanks, Len. I am going to order the Giottos rocket blower and possibly a wet type cleaning system. The D7000's sensor cleaning function isn't doing the job.

Thanks



Michael

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Wed 07-Dec-11 04:57 PM
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#3. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 2
Wed 07-Dec-11 06:57 PM by billD80

US
          

I am biased against actually touching the sensor, so I have a Giotto RB...

Just for perspective though, you indicated that at f/8 and larger the dust disappears. At f/11 it's barely noticeable.

At f/11, and smaller, diffraction (reducing resolution) sets in on most lenses, if not all.

How often do you shoot smaller than f/8?

Even if you have a pristine lens today, you won't tomorrow. Some zoom lenses actually suck dust into the camera body.

So, prudent cleaning makes sense, but unless one lives in the smaller than f/8 zone, it's amazing how much dust will simply go completely unnoticed.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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mhiker Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Dec 2010Wed 07-Dec-11 08:04 PM
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#8. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 3


Holiday, US
          

Hi Bill,

I normally don't shoot at f/22 but did so just to test for dust. I usually shoot at f/8 or wider.

Also tested my D90 at f/22 same day, same scene and didn't find any evidence of dust. This is what I can't understand. Both cameras are stored and used in the same environment and the D7K seems to attract sensor dust, well actually dust on the Lithium Niobate filter over the sensor.

Time to get a Giotto RB and it's back to f/8


>I am biased against actually touching the sensor, so I have a
>Giotto RB...
>
>Just for perspective though, you indicated that at f/8 and
>larger the dust disappears. At f/11 it's barely noticeable.
>
>
>At f/11, and smaller, diffraction (reducing resolution) sets
>in on most lenses, if not all.
>
>How often do you shoot smaller than f/8?
>
>Even if you have a pristine lens today, you won't tomorrow.
>Some zoom lenses actually suck dust into the camera body.
>
>So, prudent cleaning makes sense, but unless one lives in the
>smaller than f/8 zone, it's amazing how much dust will simply
>go completely unnoticed.

Michael

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Wed 07-Dec-11 08:27 PM
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#10. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 8


US
          

>Hi Bill,
>
>I normally don't shoot at f/22 but did so just to test for
>dust. I usually shoot at f/8 or wider.
>
>Also tested my D90 at f/22 same day, same scene and didn't
>find any evidence of dust. This is what I can't understand.
>Both cameras are stored and used in the same environment and
>the D7K seems to attract sensor dust, well actually dust on
>the Lithium Niobate filter over the sensor.
>
>Time to get a Giotto RB and it's back to f/8

Perhaps there's something in the D7000 design that makes it more prone to dust, though I haven't found it so compared to my D200 (which anytime I shot blue sky at f/22 I could find plenty of specks).

Perhaps the lens you use most often on the D7000 sucks in dust. Perhaps you're actually using the D7000 much more than the D90.

I guess my main sense is that, while prudent cleaning is great, unless we're commonly having to shoot at smaller apertures than f/11, dust shouldn't be a factor on the D7000, or likely any other camera.

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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Drbee Silver Member Nikonian since 05th Aug 2004Wed 07-Dec-11 05:44 PM
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#4. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 0


Naperville, US
          

Hi Michael,

I realize your D7000 has a higher pixel density than my D700, but I use a "rocket blower" on the rear element of every lens change and a few squirts inside the mirror box of my D700 (be careful not to touch the mirror) for every lens change. I keep the lens opening on the body pointed down during change and avoid as many air currents as possible during the change. In 2-1/2 years of use, I've never had a sensor clean on my D700 and there is no visible dust at f/22 in my images.

Perhaps I'm overboard on my sensor attitude, but it has kept my camera out of the shop.

Note I used the same practices on my D200 and D2Hs, neither of which have the sensor dust repel function and I did have to have sensor cleaning on those cameras - in between cleanings, I was able to dislodge any "dust" with a rocket blower using the techniques outlined in those camera manuals.

Best Regards,
Roger

  

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jadiniz Registered since 25th Dec 2010Wed 07-Dec-11 06:14 PM
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#5. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 4


Estoril, PT
          

Even with medium apertures, dust sensor will be visible on heaviliy processed pics, such as in HDR or some high contrast PP.

And yes, the D7000 is a magnet.

http://egozarolho.blogspot.com
1. Good content, good aesthetics and good tecnique. On that order.
2. Light is more important than glass and pixels.
3. In the digital photography process, software is as important as gear.

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Wed 07-Dec-11 06:53 PM
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#7. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 5


US
          

>Even with medium apertures, dust sensor will be visible on
>heaviliy processed pics, such as in HDR or some high contrast
>PP.

No, it won't.

Here's an HDR at f/9, from a D7000 sensor not cleaned in months... My heavens, the dust magnet strikes again!


www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

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jadiniz Registered since 25th Dec 2010Wed 07-Dec-11 09:06 PM
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#11. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 7


Estoril, PT
          

>>Even with medium apertures, dust sensor will be visible
>on
>>heaviliy processed pics, such as in HDR or some high
>contrast
>>PP.
>
>No, it won't.
>
>Here's an HDR at f/9, from a D7000 sensor not cleaned in
>months... My heavens, the dust magnet strikes again!
>


Sorry to disagree, truly am, but the first times I did notice dust on my sensor were when doing HDR shots at f8-f10 but, instead of shooting lots of micro-detailed patterns like in your fine example, I was shooting large portions of clear skies, and these are where dust specks would show up. Because I hadn't noticed anything on the original frames, when the HDR came out with lots of small debris I first thought of flying birds ghosting the HDR. But going back to the originals, one by one, and pulling heavy contrast on the right ranges, sure enough, the specks were there on all pics. If it hadn't been for the HDR I might have never noticed this, because it took the combination of heavy processing and middle apertures to see them, and I seldom use those two toghether.

I must say a few things to further clarify this:
1. Auto sensor clean is on powering up and down, all the time;
2. I use the rocket blower quite often;
3. I'm always carefull when changing lens, covering the body, pointing it downwards, etc.
4. Since I only shoot with primes, lens changing may be more frequent on my behalf than for many other photogs.

To be fair, my previous camera was a D3000 and things looked almost as nasty on that one too.

http://egozarolho.blogspot.com
1. Good content, good aesthetics and good tecnique. On that order.
2. Light is more important than glass and pixels.
3. In the digital photography process, software is as important as gear.

  

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mhiker Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Dec 2010Wed 07-Dec-11 09:55 PM
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#12. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 7


Holiday, US
          

Nice shot, Bill. Just imagine how much better it would be without all the sensor dust.

Michael

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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billD80 Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2007Thu 08-Dec-11 12:31 AM
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#13. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 12


US
          

>Nice shot, Bill. Just imagine how much better it would be
>without all the sensor dust.

Oh I know! Hey, thanks...

PS. On the Giotto. I use it on the back (rear element) of lenses I am about to mount to the camera...

www.billkeane.zenfolio.com

  

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mhiker Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Dec 2010Thu 08-Dec-11 01:05 AM
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#14. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 13


Holiday, US
          

>PS. On the Giotto. I use it on the back (rear element) of
>lenses I am about to mount to the camera...


I'm going to order the medium rocket which will fit in my camera bag. Thanks for the usage tips.



Michael

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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mhiker Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Dec 2010Wed 07-Dec-11 08:25 PM
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#9. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 4


Holiday, US
          

Hi Roger,

I'm not going to become paranoid over dust, I promise I'll get a rocket blower and use it as you described.

Michael

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Gamecocks Silver Member Nikonian since 22nd Jul 2010Wed 07-Dec-11 06:33 PM
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#6. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 0


Joanna, US
          

Hi Michael,

Luckily, I've not experienced that problem with my D7000 and I've had it for over a year. I do have the sensor clean set on and take precautions when changing out lens. I try and store it with the lens pointed down and do this when changing lens plus being certain that the camera is off and protect the body from wind when outdoors. This has worked for me and hopefully it will continue to work for me. My D70s had this problem until I became very aware of how I was changing lens. Good luck in the future.

John

Nobody should seek his own good, but the good of others. <><

  

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PeterBeckett Gold Member Nikonian since 04th Jan 2010Thu 08-Dec-11 07:21 PM
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#15. "RE: My D7000 is a Dust Bunny Magnet"
In response to Reply # 6


San Jose, US
          

Hi all,
FWIW, I am pretty careful to change lenses using "best practices" to minimise dust problems. However, I and have found the D7000(that has the self cleaning turned on to run at power up+down) to give me NO dust problems in many months. That is definitely NOT the case for my D3 and D3X - especially the D3. My Arctic Butterfly cleaning kit is used far more than I'd like with these FX bodies...

Incidently, I replaced a Delkin sensor cleaning kit with the Arctic Butterfly kit and have been VERY pleased that I did so. The AB brush, magnifier and wet cleaning "stuff" is expensive, but everything works absolutely superbly!

BTW, if you take test shots of a clear blue California sky using a 105mm f/2.8 Nikkor at f/32, dust spots absolutely cannot hide... That's probably why I reach for my AB kit so often (maybe once or twice a month!)

Pete

  

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