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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Tue 29-Nov-11 06:57 PM
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"If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"


Glastonbury, US
          

Hi,

I'm testing my D7000 now. Assuming it does have the focus issue, which I think it does, what has been the resolution for those that have had it? Did re-calibration by Nikon fix it? Camera replaced?


Purchased 10/14/2011
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Firmware updated

Thanks,

Rey

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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Tue 29-Nov-11 08:24 PM
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#1. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 0


St Petersburg, RU
          

Welcome to Nikonians
Can you post some images with intact data which leads you to believe there is back focusing?
Does it present the same problem with all your lenses?
What modes of focusing are you using when the focusing problem appears.
Does it ever focus correctly, possibly in Live View node?
How are you testing the focusing?
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Tue 29-Nov-11 09:23 PM
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#2. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 1


Glastonbury, US
          

Hi, Thanks.

I'm trying not to get sucked into believing that it has any issues, because I have gotten some sharp images, but I get more soft images. Maybe it is user error...

3 images below. First if from my new D7000, the second is from my D80. The Third is a real world shot that seems to be sharp where I focused (by the eye).

I have seen similar results using my Nikon 35mm 1.8 and my Nikon 28-200

Using Single Point Auto Focus

I haven't tried Live View, but I have gotten sharp images (see the dog image). I do get a lot of soft images, and I can't get it to focus correctly in testing with the Focus chart.

I am testing using the 45 deg on a Focus Test Chart using a Nikon 50mm 1.8D








Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)
Attachment #3, (jpg file)

  

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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Tue 29-Nov-11 11:14 PM
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#3. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 2


St Petersburg, RU
          

I suspect that you have been unfortunately influenced by the fade of unreliable angled chart testing. Without proper controls and conditions the results are worse than useless, they suggest a problem when there is not one. Real world photos are what the camera and focusing system was designed for, and you will notice that real world images are what come out best.
Regarding the test shorts, these are exposed differently which will result in different results. The color temperature is different which also impacts focusing on a very poor target type. Depending on from which end of the Focal range the AF motor is driving, a predictable back focus or front focus can be induced with such an ambiguous target. The focus sensor is much larger than the target so you do not know where the camera started to pick up the target and stopped the servo motor. The distance to the target needs to be further than most users allow for effective tests.
A much better test would be a flat object with contrast steps of a target larger than the FP sensor, and carefully adjusted to be perpendicular to the axis of the lens.

But you already know the lens and body are doing well together by getting in-focus shots like the dog. The main goal will be to figure out some techniques to get a higher rate of sharp, predictable images.
How many shots do you have on your D7000? I've noticed that it takes a few thousand frames before many users coming from more forgiving, lower res cameras before the focus and sharpness is obtained regularly.
You might need to increase the shutter speed to 2 times 1/FL instead of the common 1.5 x 1/FL for a while. Or turning off VR if possible to reduce the impact of slower settling time of the VR function until the problems are figured out.
What sort if images are you getting the most inconsistent results, slower SS shots? Action shots? Are less exposed images having more of a problem? Have you noticed the light source color temperature having an impact on consistency?

If any shot with fairly wide apertures are turning out good, as you indicated, I am willing to bet that the others having problems are not related to a camera or lens alignment or calibration issue, but of technique. That is good, since that is easier to improve.
You'll find that Nikonians is a rare community, in that it is pretty pragmatic in advice and having a good signal to noise ratio, and Nikon accumulated knowledge.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Wed 30-Nov-11 09:06 AM
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#4. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 3


Paignton, GB
          

>The color temperature is different...

The two test chart images were taken with different WB settings - so we can't tell whether the lighting conditions were the same or not. If the lighting was the same, then simply using a different WB value should not affect focusing.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Wed 30-Nov-11 11:08 AM
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#5. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 3


Atlanta, US
          

Stan - that's a really good assessment.

I find the same type issues. You really need to pay attention to technique with the higher resolution of the D7000.

On the subject of test charts, the 45 degree angle chart is really a scale rather than a test chart. The angle - which does not need to be 45 degrees exactly - shows the direction of misfocus IF proper focus is achieved. But the line is a poor focus target. What you really want is a larger target that is easy for the camera to recognize. The target must be perpendicular to the lens otherwise the scale reflects an area that may be in a different plane. The LensAlign system is a good reference on the type of system you need and techniques required.

One of the issues with AF tuning is that it applies to 100% of the images. So intermittent out of focus issues are related to a different issue.


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luckyphoto Silver Member Nikonian since 27th Dec 2010Wed 30-Nov-11 01:25 PM
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#6. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 5


Port Charlotte, US
          

I also moved from a D80 to the D7000 and was disappointed at first. Some of my photos were soft. I used a tripod and the timer on the camera to take some real world shots and quickly found out that the camera was spot on.

My problem was poor shooting technique (and that was with VR on). The D80 was much more forgiving.

Now I have a couple of rules. I do use the 1/2x focal length as the minimum shutter speed as Stan suggested and try not to shoot hand-held photos at under 1/125th without flash.

I don't believe your 28-200MM has VR which makes sharp images more problematic at longer focal lengths and slower shutter speeds.

One final thing you might want to do is compare the EXIF data of soft images to sharp images and see if there's a pattern.

Good luck and let us know what you find.

Larry

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....and which is an illusion"

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gfinlayson Silver Member Nikonian since 24th Jan 2011Wed 30-Nov-11 07:53 PM
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#7. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 6
Wed 30-Nov-11 08:08 PM by gfinlayson

Maidenhead, GB
          

On the first two, other than the WB change from auto to tungsten (which shouldn't matter), both were f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/80. Looking at the text in front of and behind the centre line, (both should be equally defocused) neither camera nailed the focus perfectly in the middle.

On the third, f/8, ISO 1000, 1/400 - this is a much brighter scene (3 1/3 stops) with a much greater range of contrast.

Given the much brighter/contrastier scene in the third shot, it's not too surprising the AF nailed the shot with ease.

Focus test charts ideally need to be shot in good light to give the AF system a fighting chance - I'd try again in better light and see if the results are any different.

Edit:

You don't say whether you shot these hand held or with a tripod. DOF with a 50mm at f/1.8 (and I'm guessing around half a metre distance) is only about 10mm. Minute fore and aft movement from hand holding can really mess up the focus.

  

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Thu 01-Dec-11 08:13 PM
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#8. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 7


Glastonbury, US
          

Thank you for all the replies everyone. I really do appreciate it and I think I'm starting to get a handle on this.

The test shots were done on a tripod with the same exact lighting. I just switched the cameras and put on the same 50mm 1.8.

My problems seem to be a combination of user error, and an issue with a specific lens. Here is what I know now:

1. I do have an issue with my 50mm 1.8 when focusing between Live View and normally. Live View focus works perfect, but normal focus is off. the images below show the difference, and I shot sevral at normal focus. They are all off, but vary in degree.

2. I also proved that other lenses focus fine in both Live View and normally, in the set up I used for #1.

4. After years of using my D80, with it's poor high ISO quality, but being more forgiving, I found the sweet spot of ISO and hand holding shutter speed. Well that formula is much different for the D7000. I have to learn what that is.

3. I haven't shot enough with my D7000. I've had it for less than 2 months, and haven't really put it through it's paces. I'll be going to NYC this saturday to Rockefeller Center, so this will be the first real world test. I'll let you know how that goes.

Here are some test shots all done with my D7000 on a tripod in the exact same light.

This one is with LIVE View using the 50mm 1.8



These next 6 are with the 50mm 1.8 using normal focus


















I've tested other lenses, but these last 2 are with my 35mm 1.8. First is LIVE View and second is normal focus.




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Attachment #1, (jpg file)
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Attachment #5, (jpg file)
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Attachment #8, (jpg file)
Attachment #9, (jpg file)

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Thu 01-Dec-11 10:33 PM
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#9. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 8


Paignton, GB
          

Thank you for posting the additional examples

Maybe it's just me, but I don't see an obvious focus problem with these images. If you compare the Live View shot with the first of the "normal focus" shots, it's difficult to detect any difference. The Tamron lens isn't a particularly reliable focus target either, mostly because being curved it doesn't present a parallel surface for AF to lock on to - and is dark-coloured in what seems to be quite low lighting.

I wouldn't draw too many conclusions from this particular test setup.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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torwood Silver Member Nikonian since 06th Dec 2010Mon 05-Dec-11 03:11 AM
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#13. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 9


Jefferson Hills, US
          

I also don't see any discernable difference from one shot to the other. Interesting that you are having problems with your 50 f1.8. That is also my worst lens with this camera.

Maybe this lense isn't really all that sharp - and we're just discovering that with the D7000? I'm coming from a D90, however, so my resolution jump isn't as large as with the D80.

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Mon 05-Dec-11 08:26 AM
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#14. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 13


Paignton, GB
          

>Maybe this lense isn't really all that sharp

No - the 50mm f/1.8 does not suffer from a lack of sharpness.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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SaurianFire Registered since 11th Feb 2011Fri 02-Dec-11 01:01 AM
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#10. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 8


US
          

Some of the auto-focus shots seem just as sharp as the liveview focus shot to me.

One technique for sharp photos is to shoot using AF-C a short burst of 3-4 images when the camera is hand held and then pick the sharpest image to keep. This technique can make you lazy and keep you from using and making good hand holding techniques a habit. Though I will use this technique if I definitely want a sharp image and I can't use a tripod.

Here is some hand holding tips to practice.
http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/guides/technique/handholding1.html

Respectfully,
Frank

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Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003Sat 03-Dec-11 08:32 AM
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#11. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 8


Yorkshire, GB
          

>Live View focus works perfect, but normal focus is off.
"Normal" focus and LiveView tripod mode AF use different AF systems - either of which can occasionally be fooled by a difficult AF subject.
Occasionally one AF system mey perform better than the other

Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

  

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torwood Silver Member Nikonian since 06th Dec 2010Mon 05-Dec-11 03:06 AM
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#12. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 7


Jefferson Hills, US
          

No wonder the dog is in focus. At f8, everything is typically in focus, as DOF is huge. At f1.8, there is very little margin for error. I seem to have the same problem with my D7000. I noticed it shooting wide open with normal focal length primes. I'll be testing mine, soon, once I get done crying.

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Thu 08-Dec-11 11:51 AM
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#15. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 12


Glastonbury, US
          

Thanks Again for all the input. If you zoom into the test shots with the 50mm on the Tamron lens, they are out of focus, but I can see how it wasn't the bets test scenario, so I'm going to concentrate on real life.

I shot an entire day in NYC and I felt a little better wit the results. So instead of going along the path of a general focus problem, I was hoping you could help me understand specific "out of focus" images or situations.

The one that was really driving me nuts was shooting group shots. In more cases than not, the subjects in the foreground were out of focus, with the background in focus.

Here is an example. The focus points are all on the subjects in the foreground. All of these types of out of focus shots were taken that day with my Tamron 17-50mm 2.8, so maybe the lens? I have another thread where I talk about the same lens not focusing in Live View.




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Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Thu 08-Dec-11 12:50 PM
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#16. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 15


Richmond, US
          

If you load the original file into ViewNX, which focus sensor was locked on (if any)?

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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Thu 08-Dec-11 01:41 PM
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#17. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 15


US
          

I don’t know if this is a good example to show a focus issue.

Besides the fact that it looks a tad overexposed which would lower overall contrast and affect apparent sharpness, 1/6th of a second at 32 mm focal length is well beyond my hand holding ability for this shot (I assume you took this handheld). Which gives me the impression the blur in this case is more due to camera motion blur and not a focus issue (or possibly both).

Pete

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Thu 08-Dec-11 02:58 PM
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#18. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 17
Thu 08-Dec-11 03:03 PM by blw

Richmond, US
          

Pete's right - there are multiple issues here. Although (a) doesn't the Tamron 17-50/f2.8 have VC? My first reaction upon seeing the file was "motion blur" and I suspect that this is in fact the case. But looking at some of the background lettering ("SPA" in the upper left and "SPQR" above one of the lad's head), the background does look like it's in better focus than the group.

On the other hand, even if VC is engaged, it doesn't address subject motion, and at 1/6th sec it's entirely possible that the people moved during the exposure. You wouldn't expect the buildings to move, and while the banners with the letters might move if there is enough wind, likely there wasn't enough in this case as they don't appear problematic.

Looking at the parts of the cars that appear to be at about the same focus distance as the people, it doesn't really seem like they are out of focus - although it's hard to tell for sure.

I still want to know which focus target the camera thought was locked in, but a little speculation here... if this is the entire frame (ie not cropped), the center target will be about where the smoking lad's head is, specifically the right-hand side of it. However, very close to that is one of the light strings, and if there was even a little aiming error on the AF, that's a really solid target for the AF to lock onto. And even if the AF target is on the lad's head, it could actually include both the head and the lights. In such a case, the AF is free to choose ANYTHING IN THE AF TARGET as its contrast point, so that could also contribute to some unexpected AF results.

If the AF targets are down in the chests of the people, note that they are not very high contrast targets, and it's very possible that the AF had little or nothing to lock onto. This is particularly true given that, as Pete says, this frame is a bit overexposed. Without that overexposure, the dark clothing is even less contrasty and even less of a suitable AF target.

From the exposure data (1/6th, f/2.8, ISO 800) this appears to be EV2 or more probably given the overexposure, EV1 - not exactly the optimal conditions for AF. I think it is spec'ed to work in those conditions (my impression is EV1-20, just like the meter), but certainly one has to be a lot more careful with AF than at, say, EV 15 (sunny 16)...

I got to thinking... so I pulled the file into Lightroom. This looks awfully bright for what I think of these kinds of conditions. Combined with the fact that the majority of the frame is pretty dark colors, here's what I think this looked like in person:



Now obviously I wasn't there, but visually that's what a street shot looks like in my experience. I also know how the meters work. It took me two full stops of adjustment to get there - so this could well be EV0 or even EV -1 and out of the specified range of the AF system.

At the end of the day, I don't think we can tell very much from this shot. It might represent a camera out of spec, or it might not. But what's certainly the case is that there are many marginal conditions involved in capturing this one, so it is extremely difficult to conclude what thing or things caused the undesirable results. Let's try another sample that is in less problematic conditions.

_____
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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Thu 08-Dec-11 07:20 PM
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#19. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 18


US
          

>Pete's right - there are multiple issues here. Although (a)
>doesn't the Tamron 17-50/f2.8 have VC?

Tamron has two versions of the 17-50 f/2.8, the original without VC and the new version with VC.

If the previous test image of the Tamron lens provided by Rey in this thread is the lens that this sample image was taken with, then it is the one without VC.

Pete

Pete

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Thu 08-Dec-11 07:41 PM
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#20. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 19


Richmond, US
          

Good point - it had not occurred to me that the lens in the picture might be the lens in question. So no VC.

But on the other hand, if the unsharpness is due to camera motion, the background details like the "SPA" and "SPQR" would be about as blurry as the people - the fact that they're NOT as blurry as the people is consistent with the idea that there's VC involved, or that perhaps the focus is locked onto something at a longer distance. We now know that the former is not the case, but the fact that the banners and other static details are not (nearly as) blurry still lends credence to the idea that the primary problem is either subject motion, focus at the wrong distance, inaccurate AF due to low light, or some combination of the three.

By the way, even if the focus is firmly fixed onto something in the background, this is NOT a demonstration of "back focus." Back focus, if it occurs, is a situation in which the sensor drives the lens to a particular - supposedly correct - focus distance, but it is missing the correct focus point to the rear by a relatively small amount. If the camera is back focusing, it will ALWAYS back focus. While it is theoretically possible that in fact this camera back focuses by, say, the 20-50 feet that might be consistent with this image, that would mean that every other image taken by the camera is back focusing by 20-50 feet, or by a similar proportional amount. That would be a staggeringly huge amount, and it wouldn't be called "back focus" but simply "totally broken." As in "does not focus at all."

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Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009Thu 08-Dec-11 09:40 PM
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#21. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 20


Hatboro, Pa, US
          

There are a couple things we don't know about this photo.

First the shot was taken at a really slow shutter speed of 1/6 sec with the lens wide open. Did the photographer use a tripod? Or is he really that steady handheld. The back fender on the left is very sharp and appears to be about the same distance from the camera as the subjects. This leads me to believe there is slight movement with the subjects. That's my guess.

Len

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Thu 08-Dec-11 11:48 PM
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#22. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 21
Fri 09-Dec-11 10:19 AM by gorilla_skater

Glastonbury, US
          

OK, Amazing. I'll have to admit, I think this is another case of technique or user error. These were all shot with AF-C and set to Release, so I know it will take the image whether it is in focus or not.

Here is another example, but daytime. The focus point that shows on View NX2 is on the scarf of the guy on the far right.

I'm embarrassed, because I felt that I could make my D80 sing (technically) but, I'm feeling better about the D7000.

This is really starting to round out to on eof the earlier posters who said I need to shoot more with the D7000.



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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Thu 08-Dec-11 11:54 PM
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#24. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 22


Richmond, US
          

Perhaps it's printed with invisible ink?

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kentak Silver Member Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2010Fri 09-Dec-11 01:14 PM
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#28. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 22
Fri 09-Dec-11 01:16 PM by kentak

US
          

Regarding the two street scenes, and using the EXIF data:

In the night street scene, the focus point is directly on the face of the woman in the dark jacket. However, the EXIF says the focus distance was about 1 meter (3.3ft). Based on the focal length used, you were certainly considerably further away than that. It would seem the image was taken before the system acquired focus.

In the day scene, the focus point is right on the dark scarf under the chin of the man on the right. That's not a great focus target as it's dark and lacks contrasty edges. But, even if the camera had focused correctly on that spot, it's not surprising that the other people are progressively out of focus as they are aligned progressively closer to the camera.

It would seem some of these issues are much more that of optimizing technique and settings rather than system faults.

Kent

  

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km6xz Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in various areas, including Portraits and Urban Photography Nikonian since 22nd Jan 2009Thu 08-Dec-11 11:54 PM
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#23. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 21


St Petersburg, RU
          

I think everyone is giving this image too much consideration....it just does not represent a frame with camera problems, there might be camera problems but the lack of attention to basic photography principles almost guarantees a poorly focused image from even a perfectly calibrated camera.
The images of the lenses in the low indoor light sure suggests that the camera is fine, better than it ought to be given the conditions and usage.
Maybe a new set of images in conditions that would less marginal would allow diagnosis of the camera's performance. So far however, I see nothing to indicate a back-focusing issue.
Stan
St Petersburg Russia

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Fri 09-Dec-11 10:41 AM
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#25. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 23


Glastonbury, US
          

Sorry about that, I uploaded the daytime image above. I can understand the movement, low light, poor exposure reasons why the night street shot could be out of focus, but the daytime shot, I don't understand because the focus point is on one of the subjects and he is not in focus.

I appreciates Stan's candid response. To be comletely honest, I did just set, point and shoot those images. I think I'm past it having a back focus issue, so now it comes down to why doesn't behave the way I want or expect, so that is technique. Another issue is expectations vs. past experience.

I never had any focus type issues with my D80. Now granted that is my last experience after shooting with that camera for years.

You could set D80 to Auto or even use a scene, regardless of the focus mode AF-S or AF-C, if it beeped in AF-S and the focus point was on the subject, or if the focus point is on the subject in AF-C, the shot was in focus!

Now a lot of the responses I read are making it sound like that expectation is too much for the new, improved, more expensive Nikon D7000, which is still a Prosumer model?

I reset the camera as one post in another thread suggested, and I'll try shooting more today since i'm going back to NYC.



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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Fri 09-Dec-11 12:19 PM
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#26. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 25


Richmond, US
          

OK, on this one, the first thing is that the of the image is right smack on the woman's face in the background. Assuming that the AF point was in the center, it isn't a surprise that her face is in far better focus than the lads in the front.

Where is the focus point? Which one is locked on?

One thing you should do while shooting is to watch the focus indicator - I can't find a picture of the D7000 finder, but in all of my Nikons it's a dot in the lower left corner of the finder. Look at that, and also at the AF target, before you release the shutter.

The other thing to do is to be sure that you're in single-point mode. If you're NOT in single-point mode, that is you're in some group dynamic or other mode, the camera is allowed to change AF points in order to keep track of changing position of a designated subject. This is a great feature if used properly, but if not, can be really surprising. Unfortunately I don't have the D7000 and have no idea how to guide you setting those things correctly.

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Fri 09-Dec-11 12:28 PM
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#27. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 25


Atlanta, US
          

The focus was just missed on this image. It is well behind the subject but appears sharp. I'm not sure which focus sensor you used, but it may have been a center focus sensor that was positioned between the heads.

The sensors are precise - if you want sharp focus you have to make sure the focus point is on your subject. As Stan suggests - it is a technique issue. You want the focus point on the eye of your subject with enough depth of field to keep everyone sharp. For this image, probably f/7.1 or f/8 would do the trick. If they are lined up carefully, you can get sharp focus with a shallower depth of field.

There is a difference between missed focus and back focus. Back focus is typically a very small amount and is easily adjusted. That is clearly not the case here. The sharp sign in the background, sharper people in the background, etc are all symptoms of missed focus.

The good news is you have pinpointed the problem and it is easy to address. Just pay attention to technique. Take your time. Make sure the focus point is exactly on your subject. Move the focus point if necessary rather than frame and recompose.

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elec164 Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Jan 2009Fri 09-Dec-11 01:15 PM
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#29. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 25
Fri 09-Dec-11 02:08 PM by elec164

US
          

I agree with Brain and Eric in that this seems to be a failure of fundamental technique.

I also came up from a D80 to the D7000 and my experience is that the focus system is way more complex and needs to be learned. Your choice of AF-C, Dynamic Area/3-D Tracking with release priority is not the best choice for a scene such as this. As others recommended, I would have used AF-S, Single Point with focus priority.

Also the group is standing at an angle to the sensor plane placing the person on the left of the image much closer to the camera than the person to the right. I estimate that your focus distance was possibly about 12 feet, which at f/3.2 gives you a DOF of almost 6 feet with about 2 ¼ in front and 3 ½ in back. Placing the focus point on the person in back most likely put the person in the foreground in front of the area of acceptable sharpness. You would have been better to put the focus point on one of the people in the middle (perhaps the second from image left) and stopping down to about f/8 as Eric suggested.

Just some food for thought.

Pete

Edited to add:

My comment about the 12 foot focus distance is based upon your comment about ViewNX2 showing the focus point on the scarf of the person to the right of your group. In fact the focus seems to be near the blonde woman that appears in the middle of the group. If that’s the case than the focus distance is a bit longer, say 20 feet perhaps, which would put the guy on the right at the front end of the DOF and the rest of the group progressively blurring as they get further in front of that point.

And that difference in focus point I would think is easily explained by the 3-D Tracking doing its own thing which is out of your control.


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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Fri 09-Dec-11 02:23 PM
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#31. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 29


Richmond, US
          

> Your choice of AF-C, Dynamic Area/3-D Tracking with release priority is not the best choice for a scene such as this.

Oh my... are those really the modes in use? No wonder the results are so unpredictable. I am by no means an expert at these modes, so I'm probably going to get this description at least slightly wrong, but here's my attempt.

Dynamic area / 3D tracking means that you pick something with the AF target and acquire it. Then, as the subject moves around the frame, the AF will try to keep that in focus. If you pick the wrong thing, the camera will blithely keep the wrong thing in focus!!! And when combined with the smaller sensors, it is fairly easy to pick the wrong thing in the first place. This is why it is crucial to look at what the camera USED as its AF target, rather than merely knowing what AF target you SPECIFIED - in the more advanced modes, they can be quite different. Dynamic/3D is one of those more advanced modes.

Don't get me wrong, dynamic/3D is a really great thing in the circumstances under which it is applicable. The best example I can think of would be shooting from the back of a jeep bouncing around on a marginally paved road (path? rut?) while aiming at a fleeing gazelle. Under these conditions it's hard to keep the head of the gazelle in the same part of the frame, but if you lock in early and keep tracking, the AF system transfers the active AF target based on color and contrast patterns associated with the target as originally locked in. Under conditions such as these, using a less advanced AF system simply doesn't work. Using the early AF systems, you might as well just put the camera away, as you'd have a close to zero chance of getting even one frame in focus. Now such a thing works pretty well, and at least to me it seems a little like magic, even though I have a pretty fair understanding of the underlying technology.

When the 51-point version of this came out in the D3 back in 2007, we had the weird "Twilight Zone" experience of having the AF targets literally jump around in the viewfinder. I'm not sure if that's how the D7000 works or not, but it is 100% true that when you're using dynamic area mode, you have less control over the precise spot that the AF system makes in focus.

> I would have used AF-S, Single Point with focus priority.

While I think that goes a bit far as a general statement, it's definitely the right next step while you're wrestling with focus. Single-point means that you specify the AF target, and more importantly, the camera isn't allowed the latitude to use another one. Focus priority means that the shutter won't release unless something (note: not necessarily THE thing) under the AF target is in focus. AF-S means that once it locks on, it won't change focus distance.

Another thing that may help is to select 11 AF points rather than 37 AF points. That makes them further apart and less likely to be confused.

Once you've readjusted to this system, you can start adding back more advanced modes one at a time.

I explain my own shooting only as an illustration of my thought processes, not as a recommendation for what others should do. I would have shot this one in AF-C, single-point, release priority. But then again I'm pretty comfortable with this simpler way of using the AF system - I have about 50k frames on my current main body and 27k on the second one. And I watch the AF achieved indicator in the finder, too. Why? AF-C because I shoot a lot of moving subjects, and even the ones that don't move a lot may still move to a certain degree, and I do use some fast lenses where DOF is minimal. Also, I'd rather forget to switch the camera and lose a few frames due to excess focus movement in AF-C than to forget and leave it in AF-S with a moving target. I did that on one of my cameras at the Indy 500, and "for some reason" I lost 150 frames in an hour to really horrible focus. Switching it back from AF-C from AF-S cured the problem instantly, as soon as I realized what the problem really was. Just leaving the camera in AF-C mode means that I can't make that mistake. I had switched it to AF-S the night before when I needed to use AF assist, which works ONLY in AF-S and not in AF-C. And I really should have done a pre-flight check in the morning, and if I'd have done that, I wouldn't have lost all those frames. Live and learn.

Why release priority? That's default on AF-C, and I would rather toss some number of bad frames and get the others. I use 9-point (D3) or 4-point (D2x) group dynamic modes only when I absolutely need to, probably under 5%, and I use 51-point on the D3 only in the most extreme circumstances - I'd guess I've used it for maybe 500 frames in 3 years, all of them in two afternoons.

----

I agree with Pete on the DOF suggestions, too.

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Fri 09-Dec-11 01:33 PM
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#30. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 25


Richmond, US
          

> that expectation is too much for the new, improved, more expensive Nikon D7000

I'm not so sure that it's "too much," but the two models are certainly quite different. In the AF department, I would guess that the most significant differences are in the number and therefore size of the AF targets. The D7000 has 37 targets, the D80 has 11. It's not so much a matter of how many, although that is a useful difference, but a matter of size. With the D80 there is a pretty fair difference in space between the targets. That's not true with the D7000; on the newer model they are smaller and much more closely spaced. As with a screwdriver or a soldering iron, smaller means that you can be much more precise, but you also must be more accurate. Bigger AF targets means that you can be somewhat less accurate in pointing, but it has the disadvantage of permitting ambiguity as there are potentially more different choices of subject under the larger AF target.

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ericbowles Moderator Awarded for his in-depth knowledge and high level skills in various areas, especially Landscape and Wildlife Photoghraphy Writer Ribbon awarded for for his article contributions to the community Nikonian since 25th Nov 2005Fri 09-Dec-11 02:42 PM
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#32. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 30


Atlanta, US
          

Brian has done a nice job of covering how AF works.

AF on the D7000 works in a similar manner to the earlier cameras. One improvement is that focus tracking is much better than the earlier cameras - but if you get it wrong it works against you and continues to track an incorrect subject. That's why I suggest most people avoid the focus and recompose technique - its easy for the camera to confuse recomposing with subject motion which should be tracked.

Like Brian, I use release priority with AF-C most of the time. I will end up with more out of focus images, but I also get immediate response to critical action. I found with focus priority the camera would not fire all the time on a moving subject since it was waiting for focus. The lag time caused me to miss critical action that I was looking for such as a catchlight in the eye of a bear. Likewise I find AF-A is a little too conservative and fails to switch quickly enough to AF-C if the subject moves. So I use AF-C all the time.

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Tue 13-Dec-11 03:57 AM
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#33. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 32


Glastonbury, US
          

Again, I appreciate the feedback on this.

I am still getting out of focus images. I'm listening to all the reasons why you said the previous images I posted are out of focus. Here is an example that is a bit more simplified. I had to replace my mail box post and was taking some shots of it, and I noticed them to be out of focus.

Lighting: Sun (The same for both)
Subject: Stationary
Handheld
Focus Point: on the "162" on both shots
The only difference between these 2 is Auto Focus Fine Tune is on (-20) in the second image.

This one is out of focus:

File Info 1
File: DSC_5108.NEF
Date Created: 12/11/2011 3:01:12 PM
Date Modified: 12/12/2011 7:43:01 PM
File Size: 17.3 MB
Image Size: L (4928 x 3264)
File Info 2
Date Shot: 12/11/2011 15:01:12.60
Time Zone and Date: UTC-5, DST:ON
Image Quality: Lossless Compressed RAW (14-bit)
Artist: Rey Rasco
Copyright:
Camera Info
Device: Nikon D7000
Lens: 50mm F/1.8D
Focal Length: 50mm
Focus Mode: AF-S
AF-Area Mode: Single
VR:
AF Fine Tune: OFF
Exposure
Aperture: F/2.8
Shutter Speed: 1/800s
Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
Exposure Comp.: 0EV
Exposure Tuning:
Metering: Matrix
ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100
Flash
Device:
Image Settings
White Balance: Auto1, 0, 0
Color Space: sRGB
High ISO NR: ON (Normal)
Long Exposure NR: OFF
Active D-Lighting: OFF
Image Authentication:
Vignette Control:
Auto Distortion Control: OFF
Picture Control
Picture Control: STANDARD
Base: STANDARD
Quick Adjust: -
Sharpening: 9
Contrast: +1
Brightness: 0
Saturation: +1
Hue: 0
Filter Effects:
Toning:
GPS
Latitude:
Longitude:
Altitude:
Altitude Reference:
Heading:
UTC:
Map Datum:

To get this one to focus correctly I set the Suto Focus Fine Tune to -20 for this lens...

File Info 1
File: DSC_5104.NEF
Date Created: 12/11/2011 3:00:49 PM
Date Modified: 12/12/2011 7:43:21 PM
File Size: 17.3 MB
Image Size: L (4928 x 3264)
File Info 2
Date Shot: 12/11/2011 15:00:49.30
Time Zone and Date: UTC-5, DST:ON
Image Quality: Lossless Compressed RAW (14-bit)
Artist: Rey Rasco
Copyright:
Camera Info
Device: Nikon D7000
Lens: 50mm F/1.8D
Focal Length: 50mm
Focus Mode: AF-S
AF-Area Mode: Single
VR:
AF Fine Tune: ON(-20)
Exposure
Aperture: F/2.8
Shutter Speed: 1/800s
Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
Exposure Comp.: 0EV
Exposure Tuning:
Metering: Matrix
ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100
Flash
Device:
Image Settings
White Balance: Auto1, 0, 0
Color Space: sRGB
High ISO NR: ON (Normal)
Long Exposure NR: OFF
Active D-Lighting: OFF
Image Authentication:
Vignette Control:
Auto Distortion Control: OFF
Picture Control
Picture Control: STANDARD
Base: STANDARD
Quick Adjust: -
Sharpening: 9
Contrast: +1
Brightness: 0
Saturation: +1
Hue: 0
Filter Effects:
Toning:
GPS
Latitude:
Longitude:
Altitude:
Altitude Reference:
Heading:
UTC:
Map Datum:




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Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Tue 13-Dec-11 09:00 AM
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#34. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 33


Richmond, US
          

The second one is clearly much better than the first. However, I don't think you can tell if you have a mechanical problem from this test. It's just not controlled enough. First of all, it's hand held. You could easily have moved just a little between the shots, and you might have had even more difference if you hadn't have set the AF Fine Tune. You were in AF-S, single-point - good. But it's not user-proof. You could have gotten to focus lock, moved just a bit (it takes about two inches at 6 feet, f/2.8) and then released the shutter.

Note that I'm not saying that you made the mistake or that you don't have a mechanical problem - I just can't tell if you do or not. To test things like this you need to control conditions as much as possible. Camera on a tripod, to ensure that subject distance doesn't change. Stationary subject (good in this case). Good AF target (I think this one is probably fine). More than one shot in each experiment, to eliminate one-time errors. For AF tests, defocus entirely between shots, so the AF is being driven to focus.

To summarize, you are still having focus issues, but you're clearly making progress. But to test things to ascertain whether or not you have a faulty camera or lens you have to eliminate a lot of possible errors in test methodology, and you haven't done that yet.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Tue 13-Dec-11 09:02 AM
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#35. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 33


Richmond, US
          

Curiously, the one with AF Fine Tune set was taken first. That seems like an odd way to do things...

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Tue 13-Dec-11 12:26 PM
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#36. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 35
Tue 13-Dec-11 02:08 PM by gorilla_skater

Glastonbury, US
          

Here are 6 shots in succession shot using a tripod. The same manual exposure. I belive I've satisfied all of the potential poor technique issues with this set. Also, to my eye, that:

1. Standard Auto Focus is not correct
2. Live View focus is better
3. Auto Focus Fine Tuning ON (-20) focus is better

The sequence went as follows:

1-2: Auto Focus Fine Tune Off
3-4: Live View
5-6: Auto Focus Fine Tune ON

The focus point on all images is the Windows logo.


File Info 1
File: DSC_5213.NEF
Date Created: 12/13/2011 7:59:15 AM
Date Modified: 12/13/2011 8:03:04 AM
File Size: 17.3 MB
Image Size: L (4928 x 3264)
File Info 2
Date Shot: 12/13/2011 07:59:15.60
Time Zone and Date: UTC-5, DST:ON
Image Quality: Lossless Compressed RAW (14-bit)
Artist: Rey Rasco
Copyright:
Camera Info
Device: Nikon D7000
Lens: 50mm F/1.8D
Focal Length: 50mm
Focus Mode: AF-S
AF-Area Mode: Single
VR:
AF Fine Tune: OFF
Exposure
Aperture: F/1.8
Shutter Speed: 1/160s
Exposure Mode: Manual
Exposure Comp.: 0EV
Exposure Tuning:
Metering: Spot
ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100
Flash
Device:
Image Settings
White Balance: Auto1, 0, 0
Color Space: sRGB
High ISO NR: ON (Normal)
Long Exposure NR: OFF
Active D-Lighting: OFF
Image Authentication:
Vignette Control:
Auto Distortion Control: OFF
Picture Control
Picture Control: STANDARD
Base: STANDARD
Quick Adjust: -
Sharpening: 9
Contrast: +1
Brightness: 0
Saturation: +1
Hue: 0
Filter Effects:
Toning:
GPS
Latitude:
Longitude:
Altitude:
Altitude Reference:
Heading:
UTC:
Map Datum:



File Info 1
File: DSC_5214.NEF
Date Created: 12/13/2011 7:59:27 AM
Date Modified: 12/13/2011 8:03:04 AM
File Size: 17.3 MB
Image Size: L (4928 x 3264)
File Info 2
Date Shot: 12/13/2011 07:59:27.20
Time Zone and Date: UTC-5, DST:ON
Image Quality: Lossless Compressed RAW (14-bit)
Artist: Rey Rasco
Copyright:
Camera Info
Device: Nikon D7000
Lens: 50mm F/1.8D
Focal Length: 50mm
Focus Mode: AF-S
AF-Area Mode: Single
VR:
AF Fine Tune: OFF
Exposure
Aperture: F/1.8
Shutter Speed: 1/160s
Exposure Mode: Manual
Exposure Comp.: 0EV
Exposure Tuning:
Metering: Spot
ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100
Flash
Device:
Image Settings
White Balance: Auto1, 0, 0
Color Space: sRGB
High ISO NR: ON (Normal)
Long Exposure NR: OFF
Active D-Lighting: OFF
Image Authentication:
Vignette Control:
Auto Distortion Control: OFF
Picture Control
Picture Control: STANDARD
Base: STANDARD
Quick Adjust: -
Sharpening: 9
Contrast: +1
Brightness: 0
Saturation: +1
Hue: 0
Filter Effects:
Toning:
GPS
Latitude:
Longitude:
Altitude:
Altitude Reference:
Heading:
UTC:
Map Datum:



File Info 1
File: DSC_5215.NEF
Date Created: 12/13/2011 8:01:45 AM
Date Modified: 12/13/2011 8:03:04 AM
File Size: 17.5 MB
Image Size: L (4928 x 3264)
File Info 2
Date Shot: 12/13/2011 08:01:45.50
Time Zone and Date: UTC-5, DST:ON
Image Quality: Lossless Compressed RAW (14-bit)
Artist: Rey Rasco
Copyright:
Camera Info
Device: Nikon D7000
Lens: 50mm F/1.8D
Focal Length: 50mm
Focus Mode: AF-S
AF-Area Mode: Normal Area
VR:
AF Fine Tune: OFF
Exposure
Aperture: F/1.8
Shutter Speed: 1/160s
Exposure Mode: Manual
Exposure Comp.: 0EV
Exposure Tuning:
Metering: Spot
ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100
Flash
Device:
Image Settings
White Balance: Auto1, 0, 0
Color Space: sRGB
High ISO NR: ON (Normal)
Long Exposure NR: OFF
Active D-Lighting: OFF
Image Authentication:
Vignette Control:
Auto Distortion Control: OFF
Picture Control
Picture Control: STANDARD
Base: STANDARD
Quick Adjust: -
Sharpening: 9
Contrast: +1
Brightness: 0
Saturation: +1
Hue: 0
Filter Effects:
Toning:
GPS
Latitude:
Longitude:
Altitude:
Altitude Reference:
Heading:
UTC:
Map Datum:



File Info 1
File: DSC_5216.NEF
Date Created: 12/13/2011 8:01:54 AM
Date Modified: 12/13/2011 8:03:04 AM
File Size: 17.4 MB
Image Size: L (4928 x 3264)
File Info 2
Date Shot: 12/13/2011 08:01:54.10
Time Zone and Date: UTC-5, DST:ON
Image Quality: Lossless Compressed RAW (14-bit)
Artist: Rey Rasco
Copyright:
Camera Info
Device: Nikon D7000
Lens: 50mm F/1.8D
Focal Length: 50mm
Focus Mode: AF-S
AF-Area Mode: Normal Area
VR:
AF Fine Tune: OFF
Exposure
Aperture: F/1.8
Shutter Speed: 1/160s
Exposure Mode: Manual
Exposure Comp.: 0EV
Exposure Tuning:
Metering: Spot
ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100
Flash
Device:
Image Settings
White Balance: Auto1, 0, 0
Color Space: sRGB
High ISO NR: ON (Normal)
Long Exposure NR: OFF
Active D-Lighting: OFF
Image Authentication:
Vignette Control:
Auto Distortion Control: OFF
Picture Control
Picture Control: STANDARD
Base: STANDARD
Quick Adjust: -
Sharpening: 9
Contrast: +1
Brightness: 0
Saturation: +1
Hue: 0
Filter Effects:
Toning:
GPS
Latitude:
Longitude:
Altitude:
Altitude Reference:
Heading:
UTC:
Map Datum:



File Info 1
File: DSC_5217.NEF
Date Created: 12/13/2011 8:02:32 AM
Date Modified: 12/13/2011 8:03:04 AM
File Size: 17.5 MB
Image Size: L (4928 x 3264)
File Info 2
Date Shot: 12/13/2011 08:02:32.80
Time Zone and Date: UTC-5, DST:ON
Image Quality: Lossless Compressed RAW (14-bit)
Artist: Rey Rasco
Copyright:
Camera Info
Device: Nikon D7000
Lens: 50mm F/1.8D
Focal Length: 50mm
Focus Mode: AF-S
AF-Area Mode: Single
VR:
AF Fine Tune: ON(-20)
Exposure
Aperture: F/1.8
Shutter Speed: 1/160s
Exposure Mode: Manual
Exposure Comp.: 0EV
Exposure Tuning:
Metering: Spot
ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100
Flash
Device:
Image Settings
White Balance: Auto1, 0, 0
Color Space: sRGB
High ISO NR: ON (Normal)
Long Exposure NR: OFF
Active D-Lighting: OFF
Image Authentication:
Vignette Control:
Auto Distortion Control: OFF
Picture Control
Picture Control: STANDARD
Base: STANDARD
Quick Adjust: -
Sharpening: 9
Contrast: +1
Brightness: 0
Saturation: +1
Hue: 0
Filter Effects:
Toning:
GPS
Latitude:
Longitude:
Altitude:
Altitude Reference:
Heading:
UTC:
Map Datum:



File Info 1
File: DSC_5218.NEF
Date Created: 12/13/2011 8:02:39 AM
Date Modified: 12/13/2011 8:03:04 AM
File Size: 17.4 MB
Image Size: L (4928 x 3264)
File Info 2
Date Shot: 12/13/2011 08:02:39.10
Time Zone and Date: UTC-5, DST:ON
Image Quality: Lossless Compressed RAW (14-bit)
Artist: Rey Rasco
Copyright:
Camera Info
Device: Nikon D7000
Lens: 50mm F/1.8D
Focal Length: 50mm
Focus Mode: AF-S
AF-Area Mode: Single
VR:
AF Fine Tune: ON(-20)
Exposure
Aperture: F/1.8
Shutter Speed: 1/160s
Exposure Mode: Manual
Exposure Comp.: 0EV
Exposure Tuning:
Metering: Spot
ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100
Flash
Device:
Image Settings
White Balance: Auto1, 0, 0
Color Space: sRGB
High ISO NR: ON (Normal)
Long Exposure NR: OFF
Active D-Lighting: OFF
Image Authentication:
Vignette Control:
Auto Distortion Control: OFF
Picture Control
Picture Control: STANDARD
Base: STANDARD
Quick Adjust: -
Sharpening: 9
Contrast: +1
Brightness: 0
Saturation: +1
Hue: 0
Filter Effects:
Toning:
GPS
Latitude:
Longitude:
Altitude:
Altitude Reference:
Heading:
UTC:
Map Datum:

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Attachment #1, (jpg file)
Attachment #2, (jpg file)
Attachment #3, (jpg file)
Attachment #4, (jpg file)
Attachment #5, (jpg file)
Attachment #6, (jpg file)

  

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Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003Tue 13-Dec-11 04:01 PM
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#37. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 36


Yorkshire, GB
          

>I believe I've satisfied all of the potential poor technique issues with this set.
Maybe yes - maybe no.
One potential issue you need to think about is your AF subject.
It is possible some of the detail such as the small print on the target may be a subject "allowing the shutter to be released even when the subject is not in focus" - a Nikon quote from page 93 of your D7000 instruction book.
The guidance is also at https://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/4585
Sorry - I would not rely on your AF target as good enough for accurate AF calibration.

Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

  

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jadiniz Registered since 25th Dec 2010Tue 13-Dec-11 08:11 PM
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#38. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 37


Estoril, PT
          

If it's good enough to get a solid focus dot indicator in real-life, it should be good enough for testing. We don't need AF systems that only work in lab perfect targets, but real-life ones, and I believe Nikon's AF is actually quite usable. If this chap gets repeatable results with these targets, than they're just fine.

http://egozarolho.blogspot.com
1. Good content, good aesthetics and good tecnique. On that order.
2. Light is more important than glass and pixels.
3. In the digital photography process, software is as important as gear.

  

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Wed 14-Dec-11 11:31 AM
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#39. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 38


Glastonbury, US
          

>If it's good enough to get a solid focus dot indicator in
>real-life, it should be good enough for testing. We don't need
>AF systems that only work in lab perfect targets, but
>real-life ones, and I believe Nikon's AF is actually quite
>usable. If this chap gets repeatable results with these
>targets, than they're just fine.


Thank you very much for that. While I do appreciate everyone "keeping me honest", if my $1200 camera can't focus on the side of a box with text on it in a brightly lit room, I just might be asking too much of it, or myself .

I brought it back to the shop where I bought it and they reviewed the images, and sent it in to Nikon without hesitation. I'll post up test shots as soon as it comes back.




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Len Shepherd Gold Member Nikonian since 09th Mar 2003Wed 14-Dec-11 01:25 PM
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#40. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 38


Yorkshire, GB
          

>If it's good enough to get a solid focus dot indicator in real-life, it should be good enough for testing. We don't need
>AF systems that only work in lab perfect targets, but real-life ones, and I believe Nikon's AF is actually quite
>usable. If this chap gets repeatable results with these targets, than they're just fine.
Nikon are entitled to pass on their guidance on getting good results using AF - which they do in the camera instructions and on the web.
The Nikon guidance with a target like this is you may get AF confirmation even though the subject may not be in focus.

Photography is a bit like archery. A technically better camera, lens or arrow may not hit the target as often as it could if the photographer or archer does not practice enough.

Len Shepherd

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Wed 14-Dec-11 01:28 PM
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#41. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 40


Paignton, GB
          

>The Nikon guidance with a target like this is you may get AF
>confirmation even though the subject may not be in focus.

That is your interpretation of what Nikon's guidance means. In my opinion, the Nikon box should provide a decent AF target at the distance and focal length used.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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gorilla_skater Registered since 31st Oct 2006Sat 31-Dec-11 07:55 PM
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#42. "RE: If my D7000 does have the back focus issue, what is the resolution?"
In response to Reply # 41


Glastonbury, US
          

I wanted to thank everyone who posted for their help on this and I also provide an update.

In summary, my D7000 did indeed have an issue, where it had to be adjusted. However, the other focus “issues” I was experiencing were not related and were user error or the lens.

I just got my D7000 back from Nikon. The official response was "re-adjusted the focus system".

I had 3 things happening:

1. Things inside the focus point were out of focus. It consistently focused behind what I intended. I had to Fine Tune to -20 to get close
a. With everyone’s help with the test and subjects, I was able to prove #1, at least in my mind, which prompted me to send it in
2. My Tamron 17-50mm wouldn’t focus at all in Live View
a. Some researched showed that there might need to be a firmware upgrade on the lens, so I sent it in to Tamron
3. Some group shots had the background in focus and the subjects out of focus

While my D7000 was at Nikon, I continued to use my D80. I do realize they are different animals, but simply, I could point it at a subject, and what was in the focus point, that I expected to be in focus, was in focus.

I also went to best buy and tried the demo. Again, I could point it at something and what was in the focus point, what I expected to be in focus, was in focus.

Now with my D7000 back, it works the way I expected. I know this is completely unscientific, but I now can point it at a subject and the area in the focus point is in focus.

The lens, according to Tamron, had evidence of shock damage, and the rear barrel was tilted. They fixed that, and didn’t mention any thing about firmware. Now it focuses in Live View perfectly.

As far as the group shots, that, I have to agree, was user error/new to D7000. I went back to NYC and If I were to casually, point and shoot a group, it had a good chance of being out of focus. If I took my time and made sure the focus points were on what I wanted to be in focus, it had a much better chance of being in focus.

  

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