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Subject: "Multiple Exposure" Previous topic | Next topic
dbuckenmyer Silver Member Nikonian since 23rd Feb 2009Fri 28-Mar-14 11:26 PM
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"Multiple Exposure"


Jackson, US
          

I am going crazy trying to figure out an easy way to do this. I locked my camera onto a tripod, got my settings how I wanted them, then had my daughter sit at different places on a play set, using a remote to trip the shutter for each position she went to. I have 11 shots, and want to "squish" the photos together so that she appears in the photo 11 times, without me having to select and paste her in each shot. I tried using stacking, Merge to HDR, Photomerge and downloaded a couple of other time-stacking software, and the best I have gotten was an image with several "ghosts" of my daughter in the positions she was standing. Is there a simple way to blend these into one shot, is it a select and layer thing, or is it more in-depth, with masking and layering. I use Photoshop CS5 quite a bit, but have avoided learning layering and masking for some reason. Might be time to learn I guess.

Dan

dbuckenmyer

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Multiple Exposure
dm1dave Administrator
28th Mar 2014
1
Reply message RE: Multiple Exposure
esantos Moderator
29th Mar 2014
2
Reply message RE: Multiple Exposure
robsb Platinum Member
29th Mar 2014
3
Reply message RE: Multiple Exposure
coolmom42 Silver Member
07th Apr 2014
6
Reply message RE: Multiple Exposure
KenLPhotos Gold Member
30th Mar 2014
4
Reply message RE: Multiple Exposure
Antero52 Silver Member
01st Apr 2014
5

dm1dave Administrator Awarded for high level knowledge and skills in various areas, most notably in Wildlife and Landscape Writer Ribbon awarded for his excellent article contributions to the Nikonians community Nikonian since 12th Sep 2006Fri 28-Mar-14 11:39 PM
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#1. "RE: Multiple Exposure"
In response to Reply # 0


Lowden, US
          

The easiest way I can think of is to layer the images one by one and erase the background in each layered image.

Open the first image and choose … File > Place

Choose the second image … it will be place perfectly over the top of the first image.

Then get the eraser tool … make it big and erase – either the area where your daughter was in the first shot --- or erase the entire background around the girl.

Then repeat the process for the other 9 shots.

You don’t need to be overly careful with the eraser tool --- use a small size around her and a much bigger size for the rest of the background.

You can flatten the image between each or wait and flatten it after you have added all of the images.

Dave Summers
Lowden, Iowa
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esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Sat 29-Mar-14 01:31 AM
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#2. "RE: Multiple Exposure"
In response to Reply # 0


McAllen, US
          

As long as the static elements - the play set - remain in the exact position from shot to shot it is easy enough to simply stack one at a time blend in your daughter using a layer mask and the brush tool, flatten, and repeat, until you have her in all the different positions you photographed.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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robsb Platinum Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his expertise in CNX2 and his always amicable and continuous efforts to help members Laureate Ribbon awarded for winning in the Best of Nikonians 2013 images Photo Contest Nikonian since 23rd Aug 2006Sat 29-Mar-14 10:38 PM
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#3. "RE: Multiple Exposure"
In response to Reply # 2


San Jose, US
          

I have done this in the past with a bungee jumper to each e jumper. Put all the images in a stack and add a mask to each layer. Then turn off all but the lower 2 and use the mask to bring out the second condition. Then turn on the next one above and repeat until you reach the top. When done then do a CNTL ALT SHIFT E to get a merge of all the layers at the top. It is actually quite easy. Just make sure all layers are aligned before you start.

Bob Baldassano
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camera"

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coolmom42 Silver Member Awarded for her enthusiastic support of the community and exemplifying the Nikonian mission “Share, Learn and Inspire” Nikonian since 30th Nov 2011Mon 07-Apr-14 12:19 AM
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#6. "RE: Multiple Exposure"
In response to Reply # 2
Mon 07-Apr-14 12:25 AM by coolmom42

McEwen, US
          

It's possible to make a composite image in-camera. On my D3100 you can overlay 2 RAW images, in the retouch menu. According to the D3100 user's manual, it actually combines the RAW data in the camera, resulting in a higher quality composite than anything from software. You could make one image with your daughter in 2 positions, then a second image from 2 other RAW files, giving you 4 positions of your daughter in 2 RAW images. Repeat the process 5x and you will have 5 RAW files with your daughter in 10 positions, cutting in half the number of layers you have to process in your editing software.

I'm not sure how well this will work, but it's worth a try if you still have the RAW images on your camera memory media. If I were doing it, I would copy all the RAW images to my computer, then put the memory media back in, and try the composite option. Kind of falls into the category of nothing to lose but a little time.

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KenLPhotos Gold Member Nikonian since 26th Jul 2009Sun 30-Mar-14 01:54 PM
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#4. "RE: Multiple Exposure"
In response to Reply # 0


Stewartstown, US
          

My first thought was cloning. Start on an edge where some background and some part of the child is included and draw the replacement in. CS5 was the first version to show the part to be cloned in the brush which allows for a perfect alignment. Use a soft edge on the brush. It may be easier or more difficult than the above suggestions.

KenL

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There are many 'images of beautiful objects' but few 'beautiful images of objects'.

  

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Antero52 Silver Member Awarded for his expertise in post-processing, being  consistently helpful and professional. Nikonian since 07th Jul 2009Tue 01-Apr-14 08:17 AM
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#5. "RE: Multiple Exposure"
In response to Reply # 0
Tue 01-Apr-14 05:40 PM by Antero52

Vantaa, FI
          

Something like this?



I took a 5-shot burst from my sister’s jump into a lake. I didn’t use #4 because it overlapped the splash in #5. Here’s the workflow, by using layer masks. Apart from the automatic aligning (step #2) it can be done in Photoshop or Elements.

1. Load all photos as layers. I used Lightroom: select photos, then “Edit / Open as layers in Photoshop”. Alternatively, from Photoshop: File / Automate / Load photos into stack (actual legends may vary, I’m quoting from memory).
2. Unless the photos are perfectly aligned (shot on tripod with VR off), multi-select all layers and do Edit / Auto-align layers. Before aligning, you can lock one of the layers as a reference.
3. For all but the bottom layer, create a black layer mask, which hides the masked layers. I think the procedure is: set default drawing colors (white foreground, black background), and then Alt-click on the create layer mask icon (the round one). My fingers remember the procedure but my brain doesn't.
4. Starting from the layer above the bottom layer, shift-click on the layer mask icon (next to the layer’s thumbnail), one layer at a time. This will deactivate the black mask and show the layer (hiding the layer below). Now click (not shift-click) on the layer mask icon to select the mask.
5. With the layer mask selected (as indicated by a thick outline), paint white into the mask, over the areas that are to show and hide the underlying layer. Note, when the layer mask icon is selected, painting white over the image area actually paints into the layer mask. For instance, with shot #2, I painted white over the areas where my sister was in shot #2. There is no need to be perfectly accurate as long as the desired areas are all painted with white. The backgrounds are aligned, and it doesn’t matter whether some pixels are shown from shot #1 or #2.
6. Repeat steps 4 – 5 for the remaining layers.

Regards, Antero

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