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hollingwD80 Registered since 30th Apr 2008Fri 25-Jan-13 03:47 PM
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"Image enlarging....."


Hartselle, US
          

Hello:
I, like many others, have struggled for months (or more) with printing large prints. In videos I've seen, they explain how to resize images, but tell us not to enlarge them more than 10-15%.

So, the question is......If you NEED to enlarge a print to say.....16x20, or 30x50, etc., then how do you do this?

Do you have to purchase a 3rd party program like the fractle one, or what?

Thanks for any advise on this......Richard

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Image enlarging.....
tcerul
25th Jan 2013
1
Reply message RE: Image enlarging.....
elcee Silver Member
25th Jan 2013
2
Reply message RE: Image enlarging.....
blw Moderator
27th Jan 2013
8
Reply message RE: Image enlarging.....
JonK Moderator
25th Jan 2013
4
Reply message RE: Image enlarging.....
blw Moderator
25th Jan 2013
3
Reply message RE: Image enlarging.....
walkerr Administrator
25th Jan 2013
5
Reply message RE: Image enlarging.....
esantos Moderator
26th Jan 2013
6
Reply message RE: Image enlarging.....
hollingwD80
27th Jan 2013
7
Reply message Pretty easy if I understand the question
Steve963
08th Feb 2013
9

tcerul Basic MemberFri 25-Jan-13 05:56 PM
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#1. "RE: Image enlarging....."
In response to Reply # 0


Hardy, US
          

I learned in a Photoshop class in college that you get optimum results by enlarging an image 10%. The internal algorithm works best at 10%. Construct an action that enlarges by 10% then apply it repeatedly until you have the desired image size.

Tom
From Beautiful Smith Mountain Lake in Virginia

  

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elcee Silver Member Nikonian since 01st Nov 2005Fri 25-Jan-13 07:28 PM
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#2. "RE: Image enlarging....."
In response to Reply # 1


Albuquerque, US
          

"every time you save a jpg it is degraded" is in conflict with "do multiple enlargement
passes until you get to the right size." Just sayin. I think only pixel-peepers can tell!

This company sells software to enlarge images. I'd bet it uses the same algorithm internally.
http://www.ononesoftware.com/products/perfect-resize/
Not an endorsement, have just seen their ads in every photo mag, including Photoshop User.

I don't use a loupe or magnifying glass on my big prints, but Costco has printed my 10 MP
d200 images at 20x30 and me and my customers are as happy as clams.

~LarryC (eLCee)

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Sun 27-Jan-13 07:38 AM
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#8. "RE: Image enlarging....."
In response to Reply # 2


Richmond, US
          

> "every time you save a jpg it is degraded" is in conflict with "do multiple enlargement passes until you get to the right size."

These are not fundamentally in conflict. For example, you can open a NEF in Photoshop, then do image -> resize more than once. And then you'll have done multiple enlargement passes. You haven't saved anything at all yet, in any format, so JPG degradation cannot possibly be a consideration yet. If you subsequently save the file in a lossless format, for example TIF with no compression, JPEG degradation still cannot possibly be a factor.

If, on the other hand, one opens a NEF, saves it as JPEG (especially at 1 quality), closes the file, opens it again, does a resize, saves it as a 1 quality JPEG, closes it, opens it and does a resize, why yes, the results will be horrible.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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JonK Moderator Awarded for his high level skills and in-depth knowledge in various areas, such as Wildlife, Landscape and Stage Photography Nikonian since 03rd Jul 2004Fri 25-Jan-13 11:30 PM
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#4. "RE: Image enlarging....."
In response to Reply # 1


New York, US
          

I'm a pre-press professional, and we followed that adage for years. WIth Photoshop CS5 and CS6 it may no longer be true; the algorithm has been improved.

Jon Kandel
A New York City Nikonian and Team Member
Please visit my website and critique the images!

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Fri 25-Jan-13 08:16 PM
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#3. "RE: Image enlarging....."
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

If you have Lightroom, just soft proof it and press print.

Since I have LR, I don't even bother trying from Photoshop any more.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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walkerr Administrator Awarded for his con tributed articles published at the Resources Awarded for his in-depth knowledge in multiple areas Nikonian since 05th May 2002Fri 25-Jan-13 11:50 PM
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#5. "RE: Image enlarging....."
In response to Reply # 0


Colorado Springs, US
          

The 10% guideline was for old versions of Photoshop. In newer versions (any of the last several), you can use the bicubic smoother option (or the automatic one in recent releases) and do it in one step. A bit of sharpening and clarity can help after it's been interpolated up. Some advocate using the bicubic sharper method for the same thing. I've tried both and prefer the control I get with the bicubic smoother or automatic method (which is pretty much the same), but there isn't a huge difference.

Unless you go really, really large, you can skip the dedicated programs like Perfect Resize (formerly Genuine Fractals). It does a good job, but in reasonably-sized prints (think doubling the dimensions of the original image), there isn't a big difference. Go larger than that, and you start seeing the advantages of the fractal-based approach. It can be handy for printing an image across multiple sheets of paper, though, as well as preparing an image for a wrap-around board. I have a copy of Perfect Resize, but rarely use it. Lightroom works really well for handling images in the 2x realm I mentioned earlier.

Rick Walker

My photos:
GeoVista Photography

  

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esantos Moderator Nikonians Resources Writer. Recognized for his outstanding reviews on printers and printing articles. Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas, including Landscape Photography Awarded for his extraordinary accomplishments in Landscape Photography. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian. Nikonian since 10th Nov 2002Sat 26-Jan-13 01:44 AM
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#6. "RE: Image enlarging....."
In response to Reply # 0


McAllen, US
          

If you are using a version of Photoshop beyond CS4 do not use multiple passes. This will degrade the image. Beginning with CS5 the resizing algorithms are much improved and are designed for single pass resizing. It is just as important to know the native resolution of your printer to maximize the quality of the up-sized print. Based on the beginning resolution of the source file you will want to target either the native resolution of the printer or half of it. In other words if the base resolution in pixels per inch of the source file is 240ppi and the native resolution of your printer is 720 ppi (Epson printers) then you should resize to your target print size at 360 ppi in one pass. If your base resolution is above 360 ppi then upsize to the target print size at 720 ppi, again in one pass. Now, whether you use Bicubic Sharper or Bicubic Smoother is sometimes dependent on the subject matter of the image. In my tests images with a lot of fine detail almost always benefit from Bicubic Sharper. I will not make absolute recommendations on this issue because I have seen better results using both. If you are printing really big and the print will be viewed up close you should try both algorithms print a small crop at 100% and examine them with a loupe. This is really the only way to determine which to use when printing over 20x30.

Ernesto Santos
esartprints.com Ernesto Santos Photography

  

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hollingwD80 Registered since 30th Apr 2008Sun 27-Jan-13 04:17 AM
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#7. "RE: Image enlarging....."
In response to Reply # 6


Hartselle, US
          

Thanks to all.....

These are some great ideas and suggestions. This really helped a lot. Thanks again.

Rich

http://images.nikonians.org/galleries/showgallery.php/ppuser/176900/cat/500


Please visit my SmugMug gallery at nikonrick.smugmug.com

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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Steve963 Registered since 24th Jan 2013Fri 08-Feb-13 09:06 PM
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#9. "Pretty easy if I understand the question"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri 08-Feb-13 09:13 PM by Steve963

Payson, US
          

1- Image - Image Size

2- Now set resolution. I use 240 as it is an even fraction of Epson's native 360 pixels/inch. Canon and HP have a native resolution of 300. Try 200 (or 300).

3- Select Bicubic Smoother or Bicubic Automatic (at the bottom of the Image Size Panel)

4- Now select image size in inches - like 16" x 20". Do this by selecting either side. The other will retain the correct ratio. Be SURE that all three boxes on the left are checked!!!!

5- Use USM as preferred and hit Print.

I routinely print razor sharp 16" x 24" prints from D300, D700 and D7000 files. Forget about this 10% stuff. It is meaningless. Forget about 3rd party software. It is also not necessary.

I taught PS2,3,and 4 for many years at the college level so I have some idea of what I am talking about. I now use PS CS6.

I hope this answers your questions. I see some above answers that say the same thing - and a few that are a little off.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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