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Subject: "How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos" Previous topic | Next topic
kenm1210 Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Dec 2011Sat 21-Jun-14 06:08 PM
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"How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"


Hudson, US
          

Hi,
Camera: DS3000 Nikon
Lens: 50mm Nikkor

I've taken a number of photos in winter with snow and sunlight that overwhelms the subject matter.

I've tried adjusting ISO and exposure levels with no success. The photos have a good deal of washout that is drowning the shots.

Is there a filter I can use or alternate camera settings.

Thank you,
Ken

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
aolander Silver Member
21st Jun 2014
1
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
rw11
21st Jun 2014
2
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
kenm1210 Silver Member
22nd Jun 2014
3
     Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
Charlie M Silver Member
22nd Jun 2014
4
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
Leonard62 Gold Member
22nd Jun 2014
5
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
kenm1210 Silver Member
22nd Jun 2014
6
     Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
Leonard62 Gold Member
22nd Jun 2014
7
          Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
pjonesCET Gold Member
22nd Jun 2014
8
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
CPR
22nd Jun 2014
9
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
kenm1210 Silver Member
23rd Jun 2014
11
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
sl01
23rd Jun 2014
10
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
Ray Gerke
24th Jun 2014
12
Reply message RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos
JosephK Silver Member
25th Jun 2014
13

aolander Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Sep 2006Sat 21-Jun-14 06:49 PM
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#1. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 0


Nevis, US
          

This type of scene has too great of a contrast range to get both the highlights and darker subject all exposed acceptably. Changing the ISO won't do anything but change what shutter speed and aperture the camera or you deem correct. The brightness range is still the same. You can expose the bright areas correctly but that leaves the subject underexposed. If you expose the subject correctly, the background is overexposed. In other words, there are no camera settings to reduce this brightness range and get it all exposed acceptably.

Graduated neutral density filters are used for scenes such as sunsets where you want to reduce the contrast range between the sky and foreground.

Alan

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rw11 Registered since 22nd Apr 2014Sat 21-Jun-14 07:59 PM
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#2. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 1


SY
          

a D610 with its improved sensor will help a LOT

otherwise, you can try doing HDR if it is a static scene

or wait for clouds or shadows

  

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kenm1210 Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Dec 2011Sun 22-Jun-14 03:50 PM
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#3. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 1


Hudson, US
          

Thank you for your response.
Very much appreciated.

Ken

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Charlie M Silver Member Nikonian since 06th Aug 2011Sun 22-Jun-14 04:07 PM
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#4. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 3


Topeka, US
          

Shoot in manual and bracket, bracket, bracket. How much to bracket, only you will know.
Charlie

D600, D300 and not enough glass


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Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009Sun 22-Jun-14 04:43 PM
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#5. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 0


Hatboro, Pa, US
          

I always shoot snow scenes with negative compensation, about 1 EV. If needed I can always bring up the darker areas in post. There's no way to recover a blown highlight.

Len

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kenm1210 Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Dec 2011Sun 22-Jun-14 04:47 PM
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#6. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 5


Hudson, US
          

Thanks Len.
I did try to recover some blownout shots with CS4 and had no luck at all.
I'll give the negative compensation a whirl.

Ken

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Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009Sun 22-Jun-14 05:37 PM
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#7. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 6


Hatboro, Pa, US
          

I use the Shadows/Highlights tool in CS6. You can always brighten the dark areas and darken the highlights but never recover the blown highlights. It also does a great job of creating simple HDR photos from one photo.

Len

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pjonesCET Gold Member Nikonian since 11th Jul 2011Sun 22-Jun-14 08:52 PM
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#8. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 7


Martinsville, US
          

This was taken during Snow storm using a 18-55mm Kit lens D3200 The picture looks exactly like what I was seeing as I took the picture. I suppose I have run the speed up some way to freeze frame snow Flakes. But I like this affect/effect (never have gotten down the correct usuage).

Phillip M Jones, CET
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CPR Registered since 02nd May 2014Sun 22-Jun-14 11:46 PM
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#9. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 0


Crystal River, US
          

Perhaps use a neutral density filter or two to bring the light down overall and then bracket 3 to 5 shots to get the new highs and lows.

  

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kenm1210 Silver Member Nikonian since 20th Dec 2011Mon 23-Jun-14 10:41 PM
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#11. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 9


Hudson, US
          

Thank you.
Any optinion on the variable Tiffen ND filter?
I'm not sure I want to go the 'variable' route but thought I'd inquire.

Ken

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sl01 Registered since 07th Jan 2014Mon 23-Jun-14 07:21 AM
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#10. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 23-Jun-14 08:47 AM by sl01

PL
          

If possible, avoid shooting at noon. Strong sunlight causes strong contrast.
"Golden hour shots" not only have more acceptable contrast, they also have more "depth" and often more interesting colors.

If you really must shoot in strong sunlight - exposure compensation, already mentioned by Len, is THE clue, IMO.

Edit:
Polarizing filter may be helpful. But be careful - in some cases this filter INCREASES contrast.
http://dpexperience.com/2009/12/24/let-it-snow-let-it-snow-top-tips-for-cool-snow-shots/

Regards
S.

  

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Ray Gerke Registered since 12th Sep 2004Tue 24-Jun-14 10:22 PM
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#12. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 0


winnipeg, CA
          

What type of metering are you using? I use centre weighted metering when in snow. I dont use matrix metering under those circumstances at all. Also EV -0.7 exposure compensation usually. Bracketing (as suggested above) is also a good suggestion.

Ray Gerke

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JosephK Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his excellent and frequent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community in the Nikonians spirit. Nikonian since 17th Apr 2006Wed 25-Jun-14 12:14 AM
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#13. "RE: How to prevent washout from Sunlit/snow photos"
In response to Reply # 0


Seattle, WA, US
          

Snow scenes usually have a large dynamic range to them. The newer cameras help with their expanded range sensors, but even then the difference between the highlights and the shadows are still too big for the sensors.

The light meters tend to want to average the scene to a medium gray. The newer cameras are better at handling the snow, but still not perfect. Shooting raw instead of JPG is a big help.

What to do depends on the type of picture you are looking for. If you want a landscape shot, you could go with the metered shot or maybe dial in a little negative EV so that you maintain the detail in the snow and fix the exposure in post processing.

If you are looking for a people shot (skiers, snowshoers, etc.) then you will want to overexpose the snow to get the people exposed correctly using a goodly amount of +EV.

Unfortunately, without going into HDR processing, getting both in the same shot is not possible.

---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+
Joseph K
Seattle, WA, USA

D700, D200, D70S, 24-70mm f/2.8, VR 70-200mm f/2.8 II, TC20e3,
50mm f/1.4 D, 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 DX

  

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Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D5300/D5200/D5100/D5000/D3300/D3200/D3100/D3000 (Public) topic #9807 Previous topic | Next topic


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