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Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D5300/D5200/D5100/D5000/D3300/D3200/D3100/D3000 (Public) topic #8772
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Subject: "Saturation and sharpness" Previous topic | Next topic
paulyb2013 Registered since 21st Sep 2013Sun 29-Sep-13 10:57 PM
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"Saturation and sharpness"


UK
          

Hello,
I'm delving into the deep, I've been an SLR owner for maybe 30 years, started with a Pentax P50, then a Nikon F50, D50, D40, now D5000. Ok, I'm at consumer level, but really enjoy the heroic clunk of a shutter.

My query is to get opinions on the Sharpness and Saturation on the D5000 picture settings. I was wondering, why these need adjusting?

Shouldn't a D5000 and a 35mm 1.8 lens be sharp enough? I'm still wondering why my wife's $200 Ixus is producing results that my D5000 needs adjusting to achieve!

PS I haven't even found my ideal settings yet, I'm still learning the D5000!

  

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aolander Silver Member Nikonian since 15th Sep 2006Sun 29-Sep-13 11:35 PM
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#1. "RE: Saturation and sharpness"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun 29-Sep-13 11:39 PM by aolander

Nevis, US
          

There's an anti-aliasing filter in front of the sensor that causes loss of sharpness. The sharpness setting in the camera (or sharpening in post-processing) corrects this loss. Your wife's P&S has the default sharpness set fairly high, most likely.

Digital images, whether they're from your D5000 or a P&S camera, begin as "RAW" files which have no adjustments made to them (there is no image, it's just data). The camera adjusts these images depending upon what settings your have chosen for sharpness, saturation, contrast, etc. Your can rendered your images in an almost infinite number of ways by your choice of settings. A Point & Shoot camera usually has the contrast, sharpness, saturation, etc. all set at a high level compared to the default settings on your D5000.

Alan

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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paulyb2013 Registered since 21st Sep 2013Mon 30-Sep-13 07:52 AM
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#2. "RE: Saturation and sharpness"
In response to Reply # 1


UK
          

That a superb explanation, thank you. I can now justify spending the money to my wife now

But seriously, I can see that the SLR offers the user the option to
Manipulate the raw data in Adobe. I don't do this myself, but will certainly play around with these onboard.

I'd be interested to know, what settings people use, I'm in overcast Britain so lighting can be a problem on days out.

Thanks

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Mon 30-Sep-13 01:07 PM
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#3. "RE: Saturation and sharpness"
In response to Reply # 2


Richmond, US
          

One reason that the option to use the raw files is offered is that images don't all have the same characteristics. A sharpening setting of High, for example, might well be TOO high for some images that inherently have lots of detail, particularly if they are shot at high ISO. At the same time, medium or low sharpening can be too low, or far too low, for some other types of images. And believe it or not, some folks (sometimes) go to the extent of sharpening some parts of an image one way, and other parts of the image in a different way. (For example, sharpening the eyes, but unsharpening wrinkles!)

Everything in photography is a tradeoff. There are some things that a P&S does better than an SLR - period. They do that at the cost of other things. If your needs match one group better than the other, it makes a strong preference. But otherwise...

> I'm in overcast Britain so lighting can be a problem on days out.

Believe it or not, overcast lighting is often an asset, not a limitation. In sunny Spain or Florida, you often get very harsh light, with bright open areas and deep, dark shadows - with a hard edge between. In overcast Britain, there may be less light, but the the shadows are far more manageable, and the overall lighting is much softer. Of course, it doesn't look like a happy vacation under the orange groves in Valencia...

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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