Go to a  "printer friendly" view of this message which allow an easy print Printer-friendly copy Go to the page which allows you to send this topic link and a message to a friend Email this topic to a friend
Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D5300/D5200/D5100/D5000/D3300/D3200/D3100/D3000 (Public) topic #576
View in linear mode

Subject: "D3000 Buffer Issues???" Previous topic | Next topic
hayesronl Registered since 11th Sep 2009Sun 13-Sep-09 07:26 PM
3 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
"D3000 Buffer Issues???"


US
          

Hi all. I am new to Nikonians, what a great site!

I've been an amateur photographer since my early teens, but only recently started using DSLRs. My wife recently acquired a D40 and just last week I bought a D3000. I've asked this question to Nikon via their website support, and am still trying to get a reasonable answer.

For reference, I am using a PNY 4GB SDHC card in my camera, it is rated as a Class 4 card.

My question is this, what should my buffer capacity be? The manual is not clear, and seems to indicate that the buffer should hold 100 photos in any of the JPG modes, and just a few RAW images. My buffer capacity seems inconsistent with that, and in fact, makes no sense to me at all. Below is the buffer capacity (as reported in the viewfinder as rXX) for various shooting modes.

Image Size Quality Buffer Size Image Size (MB)
small basic r47 .5
small norm r26 1.0
small fine r16 1.9
medium basic r19 1.1
medium norm r14 2.1
medium fine r11 4.1
large basic r16 1.9
large norm r11 3.7
large fine r08 7.2
large RAW r06 16

All measurements made with D-Lighting turned OFF and Noise Reduction OFF. Camera in "P" programed auto mode. If I turn the dial to Auto-No Flash the numbers typically drop, I assume this is because lighting may be poor and the camera figures it needs to do automatic noise reduction.

Just taking the last two values in the table above, one would expect that if 6 RAW 16MB images will fit in the buffer (6x16=96MB) then roughly twice as many large fine 7.2MB images would fit (actually 13 should fit). If you calculate all of these out, you get a different total size for each setting. Is it a processing time issue? The JPGs need processor time to compress and therefor fewer can "effectively" fit in the buffer?

Ok, sorry for the long post, the engineer in me coming out.

Any words of wisdom would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Ron

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???
blw Moderator
16th Sep 2009
1
Reply message RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???
hayesronl
16th Sep 2009
2
     Reply message RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???
blw Moderator
17th Sep 2009
3
Reply message RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???
jt_kilroy
17th Sep 2009
4
Reply message RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???
hayesronl
19th Sep 2009
5
     Reply message RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???
gkaiseril Gold Member
21st Sep 2009
6

blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Wed 16-Sep-09 12:53 PM
26290 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to send message via AOL IM
#1. "RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

(extends the engineers' secret handshake )

I sure don't know the D3000 (never seen it, in fact) but I think you're on to something there. On the other hand, raw should have no noise reduction in any case (except long exp NR which I think you said you turned off). But there could also be other, completely non-obvious things, such as perhaps a requirement for images to be page aligned or something weird like that. Or perhaps the heap is allocated in that memory also, and depending on the routines in use it might grow to the point that it would limit the buffer - something that no user would ever know or care about in practice, but which limits implementation choices.

The other thing to consider is that the raw data in the buffer is not necessarily the size of the raw data we see written in a NEF file. (It might be, but I don't know where the buffer is in the pipeline.) Also, don't forget that these cameras compress raw files, and I'm almost certain that the raw files are far short of 16 MB in this state. (My D3 compressed raw files are usually 11-12MB.)

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
hayesronl Registered since 11th Sep 2009Wed 16-Sep-09 06:53 PM
3 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#2. "RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???"
In response to Reply # 1


US
          

Greetings fellow geek!

Thanks for the reply, you make some good points. There is probably a whole lot going on that I have no clue about yet. I am trying to not think about it too much and enjoy taking pictures. There are certainly MANY other features, settings, etc that I need to get a handle on before I feel I'm getting the most out of the camera. There for a while I was concerned there might be something wrong with the camera, but I doubt that now. I was also wondering if this would limit consecutive shots, but I've found that with the right settings, and not making the camera "think to hard" I can get frame rates that are acceptable for my purposes. I'm certain a faster SD card should help, as that should effectively clear the buffer faster. Interestingly enough, setting the ISO to a constant value, lower than 1000, as opposed to using the auto setting seems to help.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Thu 17-Sep-09 12:08 AM
26290 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to send message via AOL IM
#3. "RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???"
In response to Reply # 2


Richmond, US
          

I had never noticed that the buffer capacity changes at higher ISOs, but my D3 does it too - at ISO 1600. My older cameras (D2x, D2h, D100) don't do that - the buffer size does not depend on the ISO.

The thing about the buffer size is that you can only fill it in if you keep the continuous drive running. At 3 fps, an 8-frame buffer takes a surprisingly long time to fill. In practice, I pretty much never filled the 10-frame buffer in my 5fps D2x, even though I shoot a lot of sports. (I could, if I tried, of course.)

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

jt_kilroy Registered since 26th Aug 2009Thu 17-Sep-09 01:21 AM
5 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#4. "RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

I use a lot of SD cards in my work with embedded Linux applications. I have had the opportunity to use many vendors cards in our systems.

That being said, PNY cards are some of the worst, and I have tried every major brand and most minor and "no-name" brands as well. Also, I am not talking about buying a card or two here or there, a small purchase is 20 cards.

We now use Sandisk UltraII and ExtremeIII cards exclusively. I have even changed our warranty statement to require those cards. These are systems that are priced somewhere north of a new 50 mega pixel medium format kit, that perform mission critical functions (Mistakes costs millions, if not lives) so we do not make these choices casually.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
hayesronl Registered since 11th Sep 2009Sat 19-Sep-09 01:45 PM
3 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#5. "RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???"
In response to Reply # 4


US
          

Thanks for the responses... yeah, I think the ISO dependency is just a function of automatic noise reduction done at high settings.

The comments about the SD cards are interesting. It seems that has to be the case, that some are better than others, but I had a hell of a time finding much online on that topic.

I'd been eyeing the Ultra III for my camera, I think I might get one and move the PNY down to the D40.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
gkaiseril Gold Member Nikonian since 28th Oct 2005Mon 21-Sep-09 02:12 PM
6739 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#6. "RE: D3000 Buffer Issues???"
In response to Reply # 5


Chicago, US
          

See CF/SD Performance Database for information by camera model. Not only is the write speed of the card important, but the camera's interface will also impact the read/wirte rate.

George
My Nikonian Galleries

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D5300/D5200/D5100/D5000/D3300/D3200/D3100/D3000 (Public) topic #576 Previous topic | Next topic


Take the Nikonians Tour and learn more about being a Nikonian Wiki /FAQ /Help Listen to our MP3 photography radio channels Find anything on Nikon and imaging technology - fast!

Copyright © Nikonians 2000, 2014
All Rights Reserved

Nikonians®, NikoScope® and NikoniansAcademy™ are trademarks owned by Nikonians.org.
Nikon®, Nikonos® and Nikkor® are registered trademarks of Nikon Corporation.