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andres0101 Registered since 28th Nov 2010Sun 29-Jan-12 01:50 PM
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"hey guys i need little help"


Bridgeport, US
          

hello all I'm currently in zurich switzerland and its really gloomy and. looks like snow is coming in what setting should i use to take good pictures ??? i have a nikon d5000 and with 18-55mm lens. any help is really appreciated THANK YOU

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Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: hey guys i need little help
blw Moderator
29th Jan 2012
1
Reply message RE: hey guys i need little help
coolmom42 Silver Member
30th Jan 2012
2
Reply message RE: hey guys i need little help
LL49Wat
31st Jan 2012
3
     Reply message RE: hey guys i need little help
blw Moderator
01st Feb 2012
4
          Reply message RE: hey guys i need little help
LL49Wat
01st Feb 2012
5

blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Sun 29-Jan-12 02:17 PM
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#1. "RE: hey guys i need little help"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

If there is a lot of snow in the scene, you should probably set some overexposure with the exposure compensation button. I'd go at least 1 stop - but check the histogram after you shoot. The meter usually tries to make things about 18% (mid-tone) grey. But snow, of course, isn't mid-tone grey! And I'd shoot these in raw, even if you don't usually do that. It's far easier to recover raw files than JPEGs in post processing, should things go amiss.

_____
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coolmom42 Silver Member Awarded for her enthusiastic support of the community and exemplifying the Nikonian mission “Share, Learn and Inspire” Nikonian since 30th Nov 2011Mon 30-Jan-12 01:44 AM
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#2. "RE: hey guys i need little help"
In response to Reply # 0


McEwen, US
          

If you are interested in good exposure of something besides the snow, you are better off using single point metering. If you use matrix metering, you are likely to have underexposure on other objects, because the snow is so bright.

From what I've seen, it's hard to get good detail in both highlights and shadows on a sunny day with snow on the ground. The dynamic range of brightness is often more than the camera sensor can handle. That is a situation where people do HDR photos.

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LL49Wat Registered since 21st May 2004Tue 31-Jan-12 03:39 PM
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#3. "RE: hey guys i need little help"
In response to Reply # 2


Spartanburg, US
          

Would it help him to use a MD filter to cut the brightness in this situation?

LL49Wat

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Wed 01-Feb-12 06:37 AM
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#4. "RE: hey guys i need little help"
In response to Reply # 3


Richmond, US
          

No, because a neutral density filter just cuts down the entire exposure. It's like turning the sun down a notch

You'd still have the problem that the large expanses of white will fool the meter. Note that some of the Nikon SLR implementations are slightly different from each other when it comes to extremes such as this. It is said that the latest models including the D3 handle them better, but I have a D3 and I don't think it handles them very well at all, and indeed I don't think it's very much better than any of the previous Nikon matrix meters that I have, including the D2x, D2h, D100, F100 and FA. Well, all four of the digital ones are notably better than the original FA.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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LL49Wat Registered since 21st May 2004Wed 01-Feb-12 04:12 PM
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#5. "RE: hey guys i need little help"
In response to Reply # 4
Wed 01-Feb-12 04:13 PM by LL49Wat

Spartanburg, US
          

Back in the old days using my F3HP and my manual lenses, I had a lovely Cokin split filter that was perfect for this situation. I got some lovely shots at the beach sliding the filter up and down in its holder so that the darker portion of the split filter covered the bright reflecting sand in my picture. By shifting positions and manipulating the filter, I was able to avoid the white-outs and silohette images that I had been stuck with before.

AF is great as I get older but there are some things that I haven't figured out how to do with the AF.

edited to add--I didn't have to deal with snow; in this part of the country, it was a problem dealing with dazzling bright sand on a sunny day at the beach.

LL49Wat

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Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D5300/D5200/D5100/D5000/D3300/D3200/D3100/D3000 (Public) topic #5302 Previous topic | Next topic


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