nikonians

Even though we ARE Nikon lovers,we are NOT affiliated with Nikon Corp. in any way.

| |
Go to a  "printer friendly" view of this message which allow an easy print Printer-friendly copy Go to the page which allows you to send this topic link and a message to a friend Email this topic to a friend
Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D5000/D3000 series (Public) topic #4997
View in linear mode

Subject: "D5100 Manual Focus Advice" Previous topic | Next topic
Dark Raven Registered since 25th Dec 2011Sun 25-Dec-11 09:48 PM
7 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
"D5100 Manual Focus Advice"


UK
          

Hi all just joined this forum I'm a keen amatuer photographer and just got the d5100 around September this year after previously owning just compact cameras. I got the 18-55mm kit lens then bought the Af 50mm f/1.8D lens for portaits and bokeh etc. The d5100 is great and I know that the 50mm lens is good but I find I struggle with manual focus and feel that is what I need to master but felt that would be one of the easiest things to achieve first. Any tips and advice on this. My 50mm lens is the one you have to manual focus only. I wish I had paid the bit extra to get the g lens and Only went for this one as it was cheaper after my initial outlay of camera bag and case etc. I didnt think manual focus would bother me so much but it does. I guess its when the dot is on the viewfinder that focus is right but I find it fiddly and not always easy to get the stop to stay lit and requires a lot of fine tuning and patience thought I know there are situations when using manual focus is the better option.

I had read a D5100 blog online where the guy said never go for a G lens as having no aperture ring was a step back and a handicap but since I find that the D5100 cant use the aperture ring anyway I cant see that having the G lens would have been bad. I feel that choosing the cheaper lens may have been a false economy. Sometimes your portrait pics seem ok on screen. Its not until you use the screen to zoom in or check your pics at home that Ive realised they are too blurry for me. What would you suggest for eg taking a photo of my neices dog or had and shoulders shots of my neices indoors. Ive had d lighting turned on. Any tips is appreciated. Thanks.
Peter Finnegan.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Replies to this topic
Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Writer Ribbon awarded for his contributions to the Nikonians Resources articles library
25th Dec 2011
1
Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
JosephK Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his excellent and frequent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community in the Nikonians spirit.
26th Dec 2011
2
Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
Dark Raven
26th Dec 2011
3
Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Writer Ribbon awarded for his contributions to the Nikonians Resources articles library
26th Dec 2011
4
Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
Drbee Silver Member
26th Dec 2011
5
Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
Dark Raven
26th Dec 2011
6
     Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
Dark Raven
03rd Jan 2012
7
          Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
MEMcD Moderator In depth knowledge in various areas
03rd Jan 2012
8
               Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
Dark Raven
03rd Jan 2012
9
Reply message RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice
blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas
03rd Jan 2012
10

Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Writer Ribbon awarded for his contributions to the Nikonians Resources articles library Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009Sun 25-Dec-11 10:57 PM
3530 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#1. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 0


Hatboro, Pa, US
          

Hi Peter,

My first advise is not not read any more blogs from this particular blogger.

My next advise is to sell the 50mm D lens. If you're having a lot of trouble manually focusing you'll end up not using it anyway.

I would say to nail manual focus you could use liveview but that's not a good option for following a dog around. It's great for long telephotos though.

In any case good luck. The D5100 camera is capable of producing sparkling photos.

Len

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
JosephK Silver Member Fellow Ribbon awarded for his excellent and frequent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community in the Nikonians spirit. Nikonian since 17th Apr 2006Mon 26-Dec-11 12:29 AM
5062 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#2. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 1


Seattle, WA, US
          

Len is correct about the blogger and the lens.

DSLRs are not designed for manual focus, especially the DX bodies. While it can be done, all of the factory focus screens are optimized for auto-focus and have removed all the manual focus aids.

If you see yourself doing a lot of manual focus work, you will probably want to replace the factory focus screen with one optimized for manual focus, for example the ones by KatzEyeOptics.com

---------+---------+---------+---------+
Joseph K
Seattle, WA, USA

D700, D200, D70S, 24-70mm f/2.8, VR 70-200mm f/2.8 II, 50mm f/1.4 D,
17-55mm f/2.8 DX, 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR, 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 DX

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Dark Raven Registered since 25th Dec 2011Mon 26-Dec-11 02:24 AM
7 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#3. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 0
Mon 26-Dec-11 02:33 AM by Dark Raven

UK
          

Hi thanks for the advice I think your right that maybe I should sell my D lens I could put it up on gumtree or something I still have the box etc. Sharpness and being in focus is something I worry about. And it you knew that your camera was handling that for you that one less thing to worry about. Then you can concentrate on composition exposure and all that. I would probably change it for this one 50mm lens instead AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G and will be less expensive than the 1.4G people say the 50mm are good for portraits and background blur. The blog I was refering too I looked up and found that it was Ken Rockwells site I guess a lot of you will be familiar with it as prior to joining this fourm one or two people where not so complimentary about him on another site. He has a guide to the various lenses and it was this line in particular that had put me off the G lens at that time.

** G is not a feature. G is a handicap. G lenses are lenses which have been crippled by removing their aperture rings to save cost. This is a classic example of taking away features while making customers think they are getting something new. G eliminates many features with older cameras. Since G lens is a crippled version of something else, you must look in the other columns that apply to your lens, probably traditional AF or AF-s. The features that will work are only those present in all relevant columns. But the D5100 is not an older camera I should have thought about that. I'm looking forward to participating in this forum more and maybe somnetime I can upload a few pics that I have took with the camera.
Thanks. Peter.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Leonard62 Gold Member Awarded for excellent contributions and sharing his in-depth knowledge and experience with the community, especially of Nikkor Lenses Writer Ribbon awarded for his contributions to the Nikonians Resources articles library Nikonian since 15th Mar 2009Mon 26-Dec-11 03:12 AM
3530 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#4. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 3


Hatboro, Pa, US
          

I could have guessed it was KR you were referring to. Most of us ignore what he says as he can be over the top at times.

He's talking about earlier film cameras. Even the F90 from 1992 could use the G lens in program and shutter priority mode.

Len

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Drbee Silver Member Nikonian since 05th Aug 2004Mon 26-Dec-11 03:38 AM
5858 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#5. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 0


US
          

You have a fine camera and bad information on the AFD lens. The lens is many things that recommend it highly, but not in manual focus on a DX body.

I would sell the lens. Next I would review all your images that you have taken to this point using the 18-55mm lens and see if you are readily choosing to use that lens at or about the 50mm focal length.

Nikon makes two excellent "G" lenses that work on a DX camera; notably the 35mm f/1.8G AFS DX and the 50mm f/1.8G AFS. If you are satisified with the focal length of your current 50mm f/1.8 AFD, then the 50mm f/1.8G AFS is the correct lens for your D5100. If you would like a slightly wider field of view, the 35mm f/1.8G AFS DX lens might be worth looking into.

I'm sorry you had to endure this problem. Fortunately, I think this is one time to cut your losses and replace it with the correct lens for you. Life will be so much more enjoyable and productive and all that time you are investing in trying to manual focus a lens on a camera that wasn't built for manual focus will be better spent enjoying photography or something else.

Best Regards,
Roger

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Dark Raven Registered since 25th Dec 2011Mon 26-Dec-11 04:10 AM
7 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#6. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 5


UK
          

Your so right Rodger I can get back to enjoying photography take the picture and not have to spen so much time messing about with it before hand and at least with the G Lens I could do manual if I really needed too but at least I would have the choice and also have the silent wave motor plus Ive just read a review with rated the G lens as having slightly better bokeh and picture quality. You learn by your mistakes as they say. I plan to take the D5100 on holiday to Lanzarote with me this February so the camera will get a good road test then. I Still plan on taking my compact Panasonic TZ7 too as it has great 12X optical zoom and wide angle which will be good for landscape shots. Plus I plan to use the TZ7 as my camcorder when there. I reckon the battery would drain quickly on the Nikon while doing video.
Peter

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
Dark Raven Registered since 25th Dec 2011Tue 03-Jan-12 03:16 AM
7 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#7. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 6


UK
          

I had ordered the 50mm G lens from Bristol cameras but its temporary out of stock but after reading more I have decided I'm going to cancel that order and go for the AF-S DX NIKKOR 35mm f/1.8G instead because of it being closer to the 5Omm field of view on the DX camera. Wish I'd waited before ordering that 58mm kood UV filter as the Nikon 35mm uses the 52mm filter size. I think this field of view will give me a little more versatility and the price is similar. I only hope I can get a decent amount of background blur with this lens and that the bokeh is fairly decent quality.
Peter.

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
MEMcD Moderator In depth knowledge in various areas Nikonian since 24th Dec 2007Tue 03-Jan-12 03:52 AM
27231 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#8. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 7


US
          

Hi Peter,

Welcome to Nikonians!

>Wish I'd waited before
>ordering that 58mm kood UV filter as the Nikon 35mm uses the
>52mm filter size.

Keep in mind that DLSR's are not sensitive to UV light.
If you want to use a filter for protection, get a quality clear multi-coated filter.
Good Luck and Enjoy your Nikons!

Best Regards,
Marty

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

                
Dark Raven Registered since 25th Dec 2011Tue 03-Jan-12 04:37 AM
7 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profile
#9. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 8


UK
          

It was a friend of mine who owns a Canon 550D who had originaly informed me that UV filters where good protection for your lense but I didnt know that DSLR's are not sensitive to UV light so you learn something new every day.
Thanks.

>Keep in mind that DLSR's are not sensitive to UV light.
>If you want to use a filter for protection, get a quality
>clear multi-coated filter.
>Good Luck and Enjoy your Nikons!
>
>

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Tue 03-Jan-12 12:04 PM
26952 posts Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin    Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to send message via AOL IM
#10. "RE: D5100 Manual Focus Advice"
In response to Reply # 0
Tue 03-Jan-12 12:21 PM by blw

Richmond, US
          

You've gotten good advice. An AFS lens that will AF on your camera is an entirely appropriate solution.

> ** G is not a feature. G is a handicap. G lenses are lenses which have been crippled by removing their aperture rings to save cost.

For the record, the aperture ring is not removed merely to save cost. On today's cameras the aperture ring serves worse than no purpose. Everything is being controlled by the camera, either directly or indirectly. Moreover, with the aperture ring, you'd be AMAZED at how many people post "I just got my new lens and all it does is say fEE..." People even return lenses because of this! On modern cameras, the aperture ring is just something else to go wrong, with essentially no benefit(*).

Claiming that the G is a handicap is like claiming that your appendix helps you live a better life. The automotive analogy would be claiming that the lack of a crank starter (like a 1930's Model T) or even a manual choke (in a 1950's car) was merely removed to save cost in a Toyota Prius, a car that turns its gasoline engine on and off automagically and under electronic control ...

Incidentally, I said "today's cameras" above. "Today" really means "since 1995." It's been more than two full decades since Nikon has offered a camera that required the use of an aperture ring. The two exceptions within the past twenty years are the ultra-budget manual focus FM-10 of 1995 and the deliberately retro FM3a of 2001, which was also fully manual focus. Leaving aside these two, the last thirty million or so Nikon SLRs and DSLRs have all been designs that have less than no need of an aperture ring. I think it's time for KR to move on, into the 1990s.

-----

(*) Yes, I am aware that there are still occasionally reasons to use an aperture ring, including use on a bellows, and reversed lenses for ultra-macro magnification. Quick, how many of us are using a bellows? Bet it's less than 0.01%. (Hint: Nikon discontinued the PB-6 about twenty years ago, and the current Novoflex ones run about $700 and up.) And yes I am also aware that modern top-level Nikons can be configured to control aperture on non-G lenses with the aperture ring. That's different from needing to use one.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

Alert Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Forums Lobby GET TO KNOW YOUR CAMERA & MASTER IT Nikon D5000/D3000 series (Public) topic #4997 Previous topic | Next topic