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tarakul Registered since 16th Jun 2010Wed 16-Jun-10 02:07 PM
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"Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
Wed 16-Jun-10 02:08 PM by tarakul

GB
          

Hi Everyone

New user here and hope to contribute to this great forum lots as I get to grips with owning an SLR.

I believe my Nikon is faulty and here is why:

1. in auto mode it gets easily confused between the background and the foreground, 50-50 chance if you are taking a picture of a person whether the background will be in focus or the person.

2. In auto mode with no flash it takes blurry images even in great lighting, it is so difficult and no matter how still you hold it some aspect of the picture is blurry.

3. Taking picture of foliage (even with tripod) the image is ever so slightly blurry that the leaves or branches etc do not appear sharp when you zoom in photo-shop to 100% of the 14mp image

Any ideas on how I can test if I have a faulty camera or if it is me? I would have expected in auto modes the camera to take better than point and shoot images each and every click with no issues.

Thanks

Taz


  

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Subject Author Message Date ID
Reply message RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?
blw Moderator
16th Jun 2010
1
Reply message RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?
tarakul
16th Jun 2010
2
     Reply message RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?
blw Moderator
17th Jun 2010
4
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Asgard Administrator
16th Jun 2010
3
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parubok
30th Jun 2010
5
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MEMcD Moderator
30th Jun 2010
6
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parubok
30th Jun 2010
7
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briantilley Moderator
30th Jun 2010
8
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parubok
01st Jul 2010
9
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MEMcD Moderator
01st Jul 2010
10
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parubok
01st Jul 2010
11
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briantilley Moderator
01st Jul 2010
12
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DigitalDarrell Team Member
01st Jul 2010
13
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wwt67 Silver Member
02nd Jul 2010
14
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parubok
02nd Jul 2010
16
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parubok
02nd Jul 2010
15
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DigitalDarrell Team Member
02nd Jul 2010
17
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parubok
02nd Jul 2010
18
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blw Moderator
02nd Jul 2010
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DigitalDarrell Team Member
02nd Jul 2010
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blw Moderator
06th Jul 2010
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parubok
02nd Jul 2010
21
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parubok
03rd Jul 2010
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DigitalDarrell Team Member
03rd Jul 2010
23
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03rd Jul 2010
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DigitalDarrell Team Member
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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Wed 16-Jun-10 02:57 PM
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#1. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 0


Richmond, US
          

It's hard to tell for sure without seeing some of the pictures and the shooting data (aperture, shutter speed, some other stuff like that), but having seen many such reports in the past, here's my guess sight unseen:

1) Yep, this is, as one computer vendor used to write in its manuals, "probable user error." If you have even a small error aiming the AF target, this is exactly what happens. The camera can't read your mind to know what your intended subject is, so it has to take your instruction literally.

2) I would guess that your definition of "great lighting" and the camera's are different. The common everyday indoor lighting in our living rooms is actually pretty low light to a camera, especially with the relatively slow kit lenses that come with the cameras. Watch the shutter speed before you take the picture - I'll bet that the shutter speeds are much lower than 1 / (focal length + 50%). Ie if you're shooting at 55mm, you probably want a shutter speed faster than about 1/80th if you're like most of us. A few folks have hands of steel and can manage that at 1/30th, and others who've had too much coffee need 1/125th. It also comes down to your technique holding the camera.

The reason that flash "fixes" the problem is that the flash duration is very brief, always faster than 1/500th sec and often more like 1/2000th sec. So any movement of subject or camera is very, very small and not visible. In fact, some advanced photographers exploit this very situation: when you see a picture of a bullet going through a balloon, that's a flash picture taken with a flash duration in the vicinity of 1/30,000th sec or so.

3) Again, this probably shutter speed. If the shutter speed is, for example, 1/3rd sec, the wind blowing the leaves gently will cause them to be in motion, leaving a smeared or blurry appearance. Note that the image is really 12mp, not 14m, by the way. (Not that it matters much, and certainly not to this discussion.)

> Any ideas on how I can test if I have a faulty camera or if it is me?

Based on the fact that you're a beginner, and that your description matches literally thousands of similar queries in the past, I'd give at least 20:1 odds that the camera is performing perfectly.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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tarakul Registered since 16th Jun 2010Wed 16-Jun-10 03:21 PM
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#2. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 1


GB
          

Hey

Thanks for the prompt response - I agree with what you state the only thing that is bugging me is I never had focusing/blurry issues with a point and shoot. Is it just that SLRs need more patience and practice?

I was just hoping in auto mode it would be just like a point and shoot whilst giving me better quality images - and in time I would learn to use it as a true camera.

Would there be any good test situations + settings that I could take some pics and upload and then you guys with your expert eyes can let me know if that is the expected result?

Thanks

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Thu 17-Jun-10 01:24 AM
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#4. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 2


Richmond, US
          

> the only thing that is bugging me is I never had focusing/blurry issues with a point and shoot. Is it just that SLRs need more patience and practice?

Probably. They're both cameras, but they aren't the same. In particular, a P&S has a very short focal length lens. For example, one of mine has a 5.4mm-10.8mm lens. Focused at 10 feet, the depth of field keeps everything in focus from 2 feet to infinity! By comparison, the 18-55mm lens at 55mm, focused at that same 10 feet, produces depth of field from 9 feet to 11 feet. With the P&S you basically can't miss, while as you can see with the DSLR, it simply doesn't take much of an error to put your intended subject right out of focus...

You can also exploit this. For example, shooting a portrait, with a 135/f2 lens at 7 feet, depth of field is a minimal one inch. This has the effect of rendering the entire background out of focus, while the subject is in sharp focus. The eye pretty much can't look at anything else. Of course, in a situation like this, you have no room for error - a miss on focus and the whole shot is toast.

In general if you stop down - that is, shoot at narrow apertures such as f/16 - you'll get a lot more DOF, making it a lot easier to get the focus all over the frame. Of course, that also means that it's harder to hold the camera still, or that you need to use flash, or a (much) higher ISO - there's no free lunch.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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Asgard Administrator He is your Chief Guardian Angel at the Helpdesk and knows a lot about a lot Nikonian since 07th Apr 2004Wed 16-Jun-10 07:16 PM
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#3. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 0


East Frisia, DE
          

Hi Tarakul

normally in each mode it is possible to get sharp images.

You may read also this:

http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/guides/technique/handholding1.html

Let us know if it has helped you.

Gerold - Nikonian in East Frisia
Eala Freya Fresena

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Wed 30-Jun-10 08:38 AM
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#5. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 0


IL
          

Hi.
I have similar problems with my D3000 - many pictures that it produces are blurry. I don't have a definitive answer why it happens, but it seems that the autofocus is buggy and sometimes it misses the target (I think D3000 and D5000 use the same autofocus subsystem). One review <http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D3000/D3000A.HTM> explicitly mentions it.

  

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MEMcD Moderator In depth knowledge in various areas Nikonian since 24th Dec 2007Wed 30-Jun-10 04:55 PM
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#6. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 5


US
          

Hi Eli,

Welcome to Nikonians!
The D3000 and D5000 are very capable of producing very sharp images.
Blur can be caused by a number of factors including: Camera shake due to using a slow shutter speed, Subject movement (again using a shutter speed too slow to freeze the action), Using a poor AF target, not allowing enough time for VR to stabilize the image, Depth of Field(DOF) (shooting at large Apertures (small f/#'s), etc....
What exposure mode are you using?
What AF mode are you using?
What shutter speed and aperture are you using?
Posting an image with the Exif data intact will help diagnose the problem.
Good Luck and Enjoy your Nikons!

Best Regards,
Marty

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Wed 30-Jun-10 09:24 PM
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#7. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 6
Sat 03-Jul-10 08:12 PM by Asgard

IL
          

Hi Marty!
Thanks for the answer.
I understand that taking a good picture is not always trivial and there are many factors that may influence the outcome (you named some of them). But my problem is that sometimes I get blurry pictures in conditions when it is hard for me to think what may cause it except some problem with the camera. Now, there are some reviews on the net that say similar things:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/D3000/D3000A.HTM
"we experienced quite a few unexpected focus errors. Out in the field, the camera would usually focus and give me a confirmation beep just fine. But at random, that focus confirmation would be incorrect. Most often by just a little, sometimes by a lot."

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2353305,00.asp
"Using Imatest to gauge image quality in the lab, test results from the D3000 were underwhelming. The camera produces its sharpest images at f/11: At ISO 100, 200 and 400 it averaged 1,574, 1,609 and 1,538 lines per picture height respectively. Other f-stops resulted in numbers as low as 1342. This means soft images."

I guess 'soft' here means 'not sharp'.

To be more specific here is an example, the photo I took a couple of days ago - the single focus point was on the tree trunk but it is still slightly out of focus (the problem is clearly visible when the image is not scaled down - I don't know how to upload the original image without it being resized):



  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Wed 30-Jun-10 09:58 PM
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#8. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 7


Paignton, GB
          

Hi, Eli.

Thanks for posting an example

I downloaded your shot into Capture NX2 and had a look at it. The first point to note is that no focus point was displayed. This means the camera had not acquired focus before you took the shot, and is possibly because the plain area of tree trunk has insufficient contrast for the AF system to lock on to. That's an issue for most cameras, not just the D5000.

The other thing I noticed is a general lack of sharpening, so I added a bit of Unsharp Mask to a small crop from the centre, and even without focus lock (and bearing in mind that it's a crop of a reduced-resolution original) it does look a bit better:





Just a couple of things to think about...

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Thu 01-Jul-10 05:01 AM
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#9. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 8


IL
          

Thanks for the reply, Brian.
My question is how you can tell that "the camera had not acquired focus". What do you mean by saying "no focus point was displayed"?

Thanks.

  

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MEMcD Moderator In depth knowledge in various areas Nikonian since 24th Dec 2007Thu 01-Jul-10 05:28 AM
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#10. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 9


US
          

Hi Eli,

If you open the image in Nikon View NX software and click on the "Focus Point" button on the left side of the tool bar the active focus point will be displayed on the screen.
Your image was captured at 1/30th sec., f/5.6 @ 52mm focal length.
Did you allow enough time for the VR system to settle?
Good Luck and Enjoy your Nikons!

Best Regards,
Marty

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Thu 01-Jul-10 07:17 AM
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#11. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 10


IL
          

Thanks for the info.
Now, I have downloaded ViewNX and on the original image it does show the correct focus point:


But how do I allow "enough time for the VR system to settle"? Isn't it fully automatic?

Thanks.

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Thu 01-Jul-10 08:40 AM
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#12. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 11


Paignton, GB
          

Thanks - that must have been lost in the original save for web.

It still does not look like a safe AF target to me - there is very little contrast in the bark of the tree.

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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DigitalDarrell Team Member Founding Member of the Nikonians writer Guild. Author of most of the NikoniansPress books. Charter MemberThu 01-Jul-10 10:56 PM
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#13. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 7
Fri 02-Jul-10 03:43 AM by DigitalDarrell

Knoxville, US
          

The focus point shows that the tree is the primary point of focus. The lens was wide open at 52mm @ F/5.6 leading to somewhat shallow depth of field. If you'll notice, the foliage in front of the tree is much sharper than the foliage in back of the tree. This is an unusual situation. Normally depth-of-field is deeper behind the subject than in front of it.

Since the foliage in front of the tree is sharper, it seems to indicate that the true point of focus was closer to the camera. It may be that the lens has a serious "front-focus" issue.

A good way to test this is to draw the pattern I show below on a piece of paper. Lay the paper on a table in a darker area of the room, so that your lens will tend to stay wide open. Use the flash. Zoom your lens all the way out to 55mm. Get as close as possible to the paper with the lens. Focus where the red arrow points to the middle line. Take a picture and examine it on your computer. Are the two outside lines out of focus, like the outside arrows show? If the lines closer to the camera are sharper than the middle line, you have a front focus error in your camera/lens combo. Here is a sample of what I am talking about:



At F/5.6 you should be able to see the depth of field, or zone of sharp focus. In my picture it extends from about the second horizontal line toward the camera to just before the next to last line away from the camera. This is also a good way to understand depth of field, which basically means the area from front to back that is sharp in the image. From my picture, it looks like my Nikkor 16-85mm has a tiny bit of front focus too.

Another thing to do is to borrow a different lens and see if this problem is still happening with it. This type of problem can be specific to the lens.

Also, you asked about letting the VR system "settle." All that means is to allow time for the VR system to acquire stability, which may take anywhere from 1/2 to 1 second after you press the shutter release down half way. Don't just mash the shutter-release button when VR is active. Hold it down half way to get the focus, then wait a second or so for VR to settle down, then press the shutter-release button smoothly until the shutter fires.

In other words, make your picture taking a three-step process when you press the shutter-release button. First press half way down to let autofocus happen, then wait a tiny bit for VR to settle, then press the shutter-release the rest of the way down to take the picture. Some feel that it is good to be exhaling when the shutter fires—for sharper pictures.

Don't give up on your DSLR. A point-and-shoot camera does everything for you and makes it easy to get the picture. However, the quality is not as good in the images due to the tiny sensor. A DSLR is a more demanding camera, but lets you have much more control and make significantly better pictures. You're not alone in your initial frustration when switching to a DSLR. Many people go through this before fully coming to grips with how a DSLR works.

Interestingly, the more expensive the camera, the less it does for you, and can be even harder to use for a beginner. Your D5000 is a dream to shoot compared to a camera like the D300S or D700—when you have little experience. All those luxurious automatic modes and cool in-camera retouch features.

Hang in there. In a few months, you'll be answering more questions here than you have to ask. We all went through this. It's frustrating, fun, and exciting all at the same time.




Digital Darrell

Attachment #1, (jpg file)

  

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wwt67 Silver Member Nikonian since 07th Apr 2010Fri 02-Jul-10 02:41 AM
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#14. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 13


Warsaw, US
          

Your shutter speed was only 1/30. That can be borderline for sharp images even with VR. Try bumping up the ISO setting to at least 400 in this amount of light to get faster shutter speeds. I can use ISO 800 with auto noise reduction with my D5000 and get great pics. Have you taken any shots in sun light with faster shutter speeds? How did the focus work?

Visit my Nikonians gallery.

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Fri 02-Jul-10 06:12 AM
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#16. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 14


IL
          

Thanks for the reply.
Yes. I took quite a few. The problem doesn't seem to be related to shutter speed - I mean that sometimes I get blurry images even with high shutter speed (happened yestarday actually).

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Fri 02-Jul-10 05:56 AM
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#15. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 13


IL
          

Hi Darrell!
Thanks for the detailed explanation and for the words of encouragement. Those are really appreciated. I'm going to continue to try to find out what is wrong.

  

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DigitalDarrell Team Member Founding Member of the Nikonians writer Guild. Author of most of the NikoniansPress books. Charter MemberFri 02-Jul-10 12:55 PM
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#17. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 15


Knoxville, US
          

Ah, parubok.

I did not realize that you weren't the original poster, who clearly stated that he was a newbie with DSLRs. You may have more experience than tarakul so I hope that the post above did not sound condescending to you.




Digital Darrell

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Fri 02-Jul-10 03:17 PM
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#18. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 17


IL
          

No, not at all. Thanks for your concern. In fact, I'm a newbie with DSLRs too (The D3000 is my first DSLR and I own it for about 6 months without using it much).

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Fri 02-Jul-10 05:14 PM
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#19. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 13


Richmond, US
          

I hate to say this, but the test does not normally provide accurate results. That's because the AF sensors have an ambiguous distance, and so can pick anything. The 45 degree angle test is almost always invalid.

Instead, focus on something that is a fixed distance away, and unambiguous - something flat. If there is something next to it that can be used as a scale, fine. But don't focus on that scale.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

  

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DigitalDarrell Team Member Founding Member of the Nikonians writer Guild. Author of most of the NikoniansPress books. Charter MemberFri 02-Jul-10 05:42 PM
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#20. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 19
Fri 02-Jul-10 06:24 PM by DigitalDarrell

Knoxville, US
          

You must use one AF point in Single-area AF mode only, for this test, and focus directly on the middle line (red arrow).

Interestingly, I recently had a Sigma 18-50mm F/2.8 HSM lens with serious front focus, and that particular scale consistently proved it. In all cases, focusing on the middle line would render the first two lines nearest the lens sharp, but not the center line. I had the lens repaired by Sigma and it now focuses on the correct line.

The center AF point is a cross-type on most Nikon cameras, so can latch onto the middle vertical line, or the two horizontal lines near it. If you focus there, and can't get sharp lines in the middle, either the sensor was too wide, or you have focus issues. I've tried this pattern with a D2X, D300, D300S, D200, D90, D5000, D3000, and D40x and had consistent results.

I agree that it's a rough test, but when done carefully, has always worked great for me!

The next step is shooting a face, focusing on an eye to see if it can be made sharp. If only the nose tip is sharp, the lens may have front focus issues, if the ears, then probably back focus problems.

Shoot with a single AF point providing focus, as close to the face as possible while zoomed out to the longest focal length, and with the lens at its largest aperture, e.g., f/1.8, f/2.8, or f/3.5. By doing this we are primarily trying to get shallow depth of field so that focus errors are more apparent.

If in doubt, do both.

Brian, why not describe an even better method, if you've used one. I'm always open to learn something new.




Digital Darrell

  

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blw Moderator Awarded for his high level of expertise in various areas Nikonian since 18th Jun 2004Tue 06-Jul-10 01:33 AM
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#29. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 20


Richmond, US
          

> Brian, why not describe an even better method, if you've used one. I'm always open to learn something new.

Like I said: focus on something flat, that's an unambiguous distance. Then it does not matter how the AF system interprets the scene, as it has to focus on the only possible distance. When one uses a 45-degree tilted subject, one doesn't know what's actually being focused on. And as you know, the AF targets are usually bigger (sometimes much bigger) than they appear. In some cases (perhaps like yours) there is only one contrast item in the entire AF target, but when one uses a ruler as most do, it's a completely random selection.

If there is something else in the scene (not the AF target) that has a distance scale, that's fine. Something like a Lens Align Pro, but it's not necessary to use that particular item.

_____
Brian... a bicoastal Nikonian and Team Member

My gallery is online. Comments and critique welcomed any time!

Attachment #1, ( file)

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Fri 02-Jul-10 06:51 PM
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#21. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 13


IL
          

Did the test. The results seem to be OK - the focus is where it is supposed to be. My feeling (for what it worth) is that the camera misfocuses only when some conditions exist (in the camera settings or in the outside world or some combination of them). I'll continue to try to find out what exactly happens. I'll post here my findings. Thanks again to everyone for your help.

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Sat 03-Jul-10 03:07 PM
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#22. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 0
Sat 03-Jul-10 08:06 PM by Asgard

IL
          

OK. I guess I'm a step closer to understand what happens.
It appears that sharpness of the image on my D3000 depends on aperture size - bigger aperture increases image sharpness. To prove the point I took a series of images with different aperture sizes. I did it having the camera on a tripod, using 'aperture priority' mode. So I went from F/22 to F/4. Shutter speed was handled by the camera. ISO speed was set to 200. RAW format was used to store the photos. No zoom was used.
Here are the results (I left only the object that was focus target - a lottery kiosk):
F/22:



F/4:



The image with F/4 looks much sharper (and slightly brighter) than the one taken with F/22. What do you think? Is it normal for this to happen?
Thanks.

  

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DigitalDarrell Team Member Founding Member of the Nikonians writer Guild. Author of most of the NikoniansPress books. Charter MemberSat 03-Jul-10 06:32 PM
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#23. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 22
Sat 03-Jul-10 07:59 PM by DigitalDarrell

Knoxville, US
          

There are two main reasons that an image taken at F22 may be less sharp:

1. An aperture (hole) that small lets in much less light. To get a good exposure you (or the camera) have to use a slower shutter speed—letting the light come in longer. Slow shutter speeds mean camera shake is much more likely when you press the shutter-release button. Camera shake = image softness.

2. At F22 you are soundly in the range of "diffraction unsharpness." As the light goes through the tiny hole of the aperture, some of the photons in the light bounce off the edges of the aperture blades and cause the light to scatter a little (called airy disc). That means it is less focused when it hits the sensor. For the kit lens, I think you'll find that about F8 is the sharpest point on the lens. The aperture is open wide enough to keep diffraction unsharpness from occurring, and lets in enough light that a slow shutter speed is not required that may lead to camera shake.

Try it!




Digital Darrell

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Sat 03-Jul-10 07:26 PM
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#24. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 23


IL
          

I guess we can safely rule out the reason number one:
I use tripod, delayed shutter release and VR (all simultaneously) to eliminate camera shaking.
So, the "diffraction unsharpness" seems like a culprit in this case.
I guess this page (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/u-diffraction.shtml) corroborates this to some degree.
I'll keep that in mind when using my camera. If something new on the topic comes out - I'll post it here.
Thanks again to everyone (and especially to Darrell) for your help.

  

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DigitalDarrell Team Member Founding Member of the Nikonians writer Guild. Author of most of the NikoniansPress books. Charter MemberSat 03-Jul-10 07:34 PM
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#25. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 24
Sat 03-Jul-10 08:19 PM by DigitalDarrell

Knoxville, US
          

Actually, it is not a good idea to use VR when your camera is on a tripod. The newer VR II can detect when a tripod is in use and shut itself down.

However, older versions of VR—such as found on the AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G kit lens (Nikon verified)—do not do well when in use on a tripod, unless the tripod is very shaky and blowing in the wind. The VR tries to correct for movement when there is none, and you can have weird results, including unsharpness.

Turn off VR when on a tripod.

By the way, if you are interested in learning more about diffraction unsharpness, you might want to read about "airy disc."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airy_disk (very technical)
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/phyopt/cirapp2.html (less technical)




Digital Darrell

  

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parubok Registered since 23rd Jun 2010Sat 03-Jul-10 07:58 PM
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#26. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 25


IL
          

OK. Thanks for the info. In fact, to turn off the VR was part of my experiments - in my case it didn't influence the results. So the "diffraction unsharpness" remains a probable reason for the unsharpness on some of the photos.

  

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briantilley Moderator Deep knowledge of bodies and lens; high level photography skills Nikonian since 26th Jan 2003Sat 03-Jul-10 07:59 PM
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#27. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 25


Paignton, GB
          

Hi, Darrell.

You're absolutely right that VR should be turned off when using a tripod with the AF-S VR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G Nikkor, because it doesn't have what is known as "tripod mode" VR.

But, I'm going to be pedantic... the distinction is not a VR I / VR II thing.

There are some Nikkors with the original VR I that have "tripod mode", such as the AF-S VR 200-400mm f/4G, and there are some Nikkors with VR II that don't have "tripod mode", like the AF-S VR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G.

Hope this helps

Brian
Welsh Nikonian

  

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DigitalDarrell Team Member Founding Member of the Nikonians writer Guild. Author of most of the NikoniansPress books. Charter MemberSat 03-Jul-10 08:16 PM
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#28. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 27
Sat 03-Jul-10 08:27 PM by DigitalDarrell

Knoxville, US
          

Good point, Brian!

Simple, non-pedantic rule:

Turn off VR when on a tripod!




Digital Darrell

  

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amkras Registered since 06th Jul 2010Thu 22-Jul-10 12:09 PM
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#30. "RE: Is my Nikon D5000 faulty?"
In response to Reply # 28


US
          

To the original poster: I bought my first digital SLR last fall and had the same issues. For weeks I thought it was me, it was driving me crazy and I was so frustrated. I attended a free class given by a Nikon rep at the camera shop and explained my concerns. He did something, I have no idea what but the camera has been fine ever since. It's not you, it's the camera.

  

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